SIG Sauer Academy

ADS Inc’s Other Camo EntryADS Tactical

We know that ADS Inc, partnered with Guy Cramer is a finalist in the US Army Camouflage Improvement Effort. While we can’t show you their winning patterns (Alpha) just yet, we are able to show you another family of patterns they submitted called Delta. Both Alpha and Delta are so-called digital patterns and in both instances, ADS submitted a full four patterns (Arid, Woodland, Transitional, and OCIE).

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(l-r, OCIE, Arid, Transitional and Woodland)

While it isn’t very clear from the photograph, one interesting aspect of this disclosure is that the Delta patterns’ feathered edges actually showed a lower performance than the hard edged geometry of the winning ADS family of patterns.

www.ADSinc.com

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4 Responses to “ADS Inc’s Other Camo EntryADS Tactical

  1. Johnny B says:

    Interesting. Just looking at the Ghostex page from Hyperstealth, it would seem that the Delta patters would be ‘better’ than the alpha because of the blending/shading/bleeding of colors. The pics from SHOT look like….MARPAT. Pretty uninspiring. Is it just the quality of the pics? Does the pattern here actually have a bit more complexity than how it looks?

  2. Johnny B says:

    Interesting. Just looking at the Ghostex page from Hyperstealth, it would seem that the Delta pattern would be ‘better’ than the Alpha because of the blending/shading/bleeding of colors. The pics from SHOT look like….MARPAT. Pretty uninspiring. Is it just the quality of the pics? Does the pattern here actually have a bit more complexity than how it looks?

  3. Vinny Vincent says:

    What gets me about this effort to go to a 4 pattern system is that with the variety of terrain here in Afghanistan (or anywhere else), no one is going to be changing uniforms during a patrol. There is no such thing as the perfect camouflage. Mixing the OCIE pattern with any of the other patterns looks like it would defeat the purpose of designing patterns for specific environments. For example: You are in a desert location. Your uniform matches well, but your OCIE isn’t as good at blending there. So, what’s the point?

    What is the Basis of Issue? 2 uniforms in each pattern? What happens when the area specific uniforms become unserviceable? In my personal experience with dealing with KYLOC, two very important issues arise. The first: most popular sizes are frequently on back-order. The second: KYLOC relies on the postal service for delivery. In some remote locales where mail comes by air, you don’t get it often.

    You either go individually to the nearest CIF to draw additional uniforms, or a supply representative is sent to pick up for multiple service members. Either way, CIF is frequently out of stock in the most popular sizes. This I know for a fact…

  4. Aaron says:

    I thought it was Six in each pattern…giving me a whalloping 18 unis!