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ADS, Inc. Announces Partnership With OxyBand Technologies Inc.

ADS, INC. ANNOUNCES PARTNERSHIP WITH OXYBAND TECHNOLOGIES INC.

State-of-the-art OxyBand Product To Revolutionize Healing For Injured Skin and Tissue

VIRGINIA BEACH, VA. April 1, 2016 — ADS, Inc. provides customized solutions to all branches of the military, first responders, law enforcement and government organizations. As a leader in the industry, ADS, Inc. seeks out manufacturers and partnerships that are on the cutting edge of technology in order to provide their customers with the best possible products to complete their missions.

Enter OxyBand, cleared by the FDA to administer oxygen to wounds and tissue for up to 5 days directly from the dressing without a generator, tank or carrier solution. In a clinical trial conducted by the United States Army Institute for Surgical Research (USAISR), OxyBand significantly outperformed the standard of care for accelerating healing and reducing pain without infection.

When tissues in the body are deprived of oxygen, the irreversible process of tissue death begins. For those on the front lines suffering burns, blasts and other injuries, damage can occur to tissue and blood vessels; interrupting the blood supply needed to deliver oxygen to the wound site for tissue regeneration. Thanks to this recent partnership, OxyBand™ will be on the battlefield, in the line of duty or in the wake of emergency when needed most.

In an effort to simplify and expedite the procurement process for their customers, ADS, Inc. has made OxyBand available on their Distribution and Pricing Agreement (DAPA) Schedule with DLA, and proofed the product to fit the scope of a variety of their other Indefinite Delivery, Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) Contracts. ADS, Inc. is also stocking the product to minimize the delivery time for orders.

adsinc.com

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One Response to “ADS, Inc. Announces Partnership With OxyBand Technologies Inc.”

  1. James says:

    http://www.oxyband.com
    Looks like an interesting product, reading the studies now to see if there is any benefit for prolonged field care or only chronic wounds.