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The Corps’ Secret Agents Get Their Own 007

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. — The Marine Corps is equipping Marines with a new weapon, providing enhanced concealed carry capabilities at an accelerated rate and lower cost to the Corps.

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Individual Weapons project officer Gunnery Sgt. Brian Nelson prepares to draw the M007 concealed carry weapon. The M007 offers enhanced concealed carry capabilities, which includes a smaller frame, ambidextrous slide stop lever and flared magazine well. Marine Corps Systems Command recently fielded the M007 to Marine and civilian CID agents and members of Helicopter Squadron One. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Jennifer Napier)

The Glock 19M–called the M007 by the Corps–replaces the M9 service pistol for personnel requiring a weapon that can be easily concealed.

The Marine Corps requires that all accredited Marine Corps Criminal Investigators, both civilian and military, be armed with a concealable pistol when on duty in civilian attire. This concealed weapon capability ensures those performing official duties–such as law enforcement or security personnel–are not readily identified as being armed.

“The M007 has a smaller frame and is easier to conceal, making it a natural selection to meet the Marine Corps’ conceal carry weapon requirement,” said Gunnery Sgt. Brian Nelson, Individual Weapons project officer at Marine Corps Systems Command.

In coordination with the Federal Bureau of Investigation, which adopted the weapon in 2016, the Corps fielded the M007 earlier this year to Marines and civilians in the Marine Corps Criminal Investigation Division, as well as members of Helicopter Squadron One–also known as Marine One.

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Marine Corps Systems Command is equipping Marine and civilian CID agents and members of Helicopter Squadron One with the M007. The M007 offers enhanced concealed carry capabilities, which includes a smaller frame, ambidextrous slide stop lever and flared magazine well. The weapon’s smaller frame makes it easier to conceal, as demonstrated in the photo. (U.S. Marine Corps graphic)

Aside from concealability, the M007 has several physical improvements over its predecessor. The grip lacks finger grooves but has a textured frame, improving the ergonomics of the weapon and providing a consistently comfortable grip with traction for a wider range of users. The ambidextrous slide stop allows for both right- and left-handed use. The magazine release of the M007 can also be changed and the magazine well is flared, making the system easier to reload, said Nelson.

Collaboration between the product team at MCSC and the FBI played a key role in the Corps’ ability to hasten the otherwise lengthy acquisition process.

“The fielding of the M007 is an example of how we can streamline the acquisition process by reviewing another service or agency’s test data to see if it fits the Marine Corps’ need,” said Lt. Col. Paul Gillikin, Infantry Weapons team lead at MCSC. “We received the initial request for a new concealed carry weapon system in April 2016. By collaborating with the FBI, we were able to procure, establish sustainability plans and start fielding the weapon to Marines by May 2017.”

Typically, the acquisition process of a new weapons system–from the time the requirement is received by MCSC to the time the system is fielded to the fleet–takes months, if not years, to complete. By leveraging thorough test data performed by the FBI, MCSC’s team reduced their own testing time. The team also carefully planned to ensure the M007 is fully supported, sustainable, and meets all logistics and safety requirements, enabling MCSC to meet and deliver the concealed carry weapons systems Marines need in a relatively quick turnaround time, said Gillikin.

Program Manager Infantry Weapons, which falls under MCSC’s Ground Combat Element Systems portfolio, manages the concealed carry weapons program for the Marine Corps.

By Ashley Calingo, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication

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22 Responses to “The Corps’ Secret Agents Get Their Own 007”

  1. Mark says:

    Nice.

    I wonder if these M007s will be USA or Austria made.

  2. SN says:

    Gen 5 weapon?

    I ask because SOCOM has a designation for their G 17’s and 19’s.
    IIRC they do not have a flared magwell.

    • Rick says:

      The guns recently delivered to the 5th SFG (A) are Gen 3 MOS 19s. Older Gen 3 guns have been around for a while too. A mix of 26, 19, and 17.

      Rick

      • CAP says:

        Interesting. Any reason why they went with Gen 3 models for the recent guns? They obviously asked for Gen 3 specifically because Glock doesn’t list Gen 3 MOS models as being available.

        • Mike Nomad says:

          Someone please correct me on this if I have it wrong… IIRC, this would come down to the slide finish. Gen 3 finish wears better than the Gen 4. Gen 3 slides are made in Europe because of environmental concerns in the US. Gen 4 slides have a different finish, and can be made in the US.

        • Rick says:

          I do not know for certain. But being somewhat familiar with the acquisitions process, Id venture a guess that the Gen 3 is what was originally tested/approved. So buying more is a streamlined process.

      • SSD says:

        That’s because that’s what is on that contract. If you want to add a gun, you have to start a new program.

  3. Rich275 says:

    The M model is the FBI/gov identifier, it’s otherwise a Gen5.

  4. Stan says:

    M007?! Really? Is that nomenclature a joke? If not every single person who played any part in approving it should be reduced one rank for gross stupidity. And be made to re-paint rank markings on every parking space on whatever base they are assigned. And be made to carry a large rock on their units weeky humps.

    • SVGC says:

      It’s kinda lame if that was the intent, but it doesn’t really hurt anyone and everyone will just call it the Glock.

  5. Kango says:

    This makes too much sense. I’m confused.

  6. PTL21 says:

    Could this end up being adopted in a larger scale like the M27 IAR?

  7. Jerry King says:

    Right pistol, wrong round. The 40 cal model 23 is the one.