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Archive for the ‘Air Force’ Category

Meet Callie – DoD’s Only Search and Rescue K9

Monday, August 19th, 2019


(Air National Guard photo by SSgt Darby Arnold, 134th ARW Public Affairs)

Meet Callie, a 26-month-old Dutch shepherd, is one of the newest additions to the 123rd Special Tactics Squadron in Louisville, Ky. She is the Kentucky Air Guard’s first member of the 123rd Search and Rescue K-9 program, making her the only search and rescue dog in the entire Department of Defense.

Callie’s handler, TSgt Rudy Parsons, is a Pararescueman with the 123rd STS, Kentucky Air National Guard.

Special Air Warfare And The Secret War In Laos

Sunday, August 18th, 2019

Air University Press has released “Special Air Warfare And The Secret War In Laos: Air Commandos 1964-75”. Download your copy at media.defense.gov.

AFOSI Presents Chief of Staff with General Officer M18 MHS

Thursday, August 15th, 2019

Air Force Office of Special Investigations HQ at Joint Base Andrews recently hosted AF senior leaders including the CSAF and VCSAF for their training and proficiency on small arms. While there, they presented Gen David L. Goldfein his new M18 Modular Handgun System, manufactured by SIG SAUER. Above, SSgt David Taylor familiarizes Gen Goldfein with the weapon.

According to AFOSI, the serial number for Gen Goldfein’s M18 is GO5021.

Additionally, Special Agent Justin Anderson demonstrated the Heckler & Koch MP5-K to the CSAF.

Here’s the Combat Arms Training & Maintenance Team who assisted Chief of Staff of the Air Force, Gen. David L. Goldfein during his training and proficiency on small arms.

Photos by OSI SA Robert Davis

Tactical Air Control Party

Monday, August 12th, 2019

Feel like overcoming a tremendous challenge? Do you want to work with the Army, but be in the Air Force? Would you like to designate targets and guide aircraft in, to destroy our nation’s enemies? Then TACP is for you.

Visit www.airforce.com for more info.

24th SOW Mission Video

Saturday, August 3rd, 2019

Comprising the Special Tactics Force, Air Force Special Operations Command’s 24th Special Operations Wing is dedicated to tactical air-to-ground integration force and is the Air Force’s special operations ground force, leading global access, precision strike, personnel recovery and battlefield surgery operations.

No More ‘Flight Suits,’ the Integrated Aircrew Ensemble Makes Debut

Thursday, August 1st, 2019

Representatives from Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio, visited Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam July 8-12 to introduce fighter pilots and aircrew flight equipment professionals to some of the newest developments in flight-suit technology.

Team Hickam’s Hawaiian Raptors, comprised of members from the 199th and 19th Fighter Squadrons, have been selected to be the first aircraft operators to bring the gear, called the Integrated Aircrew Ensemble, into an operational capacity.

The visiting project managers from the Human Systems Program Office provided demonstrations, fittings and on-the-job training to F-22 Raptor pilots and the AFE Airmen who will maintain the state-of-the art ensemble.

“Being selected as the first unit, and also as the Air National Guard, over any other [major command] is definitely something to be proud of, said Senior Master Sgt. Michelle Davidson, 154th Operations Support Squadron AFE superintendent. “I think it says something about our work ethic and our integrity down here; that we’re willing to take on the challenge and be a part of this new process.”

Hawaii Air National Guard and Active Duty pilots were provided demonstrations and were individually measured for custom-fit equipment.

Unlike the currently used ‘legacy’ equipment, which had been piecemealed with additional support items over several decades, each component of the IAE has been designed to complement all other items. The IAE is built to support aircrew in all ejection-seat aircraft, to include fighters, trainers and bomb carriers. Its material has been influenced by recent advancements in sports technology to aid aviators who endure harsh flight conditions.

“It’s all strategically placed so items are not on top of each other; it minimizes the occurrence of friction, hotspots or wear-down on the system,” said Carl Medeiros, IAE program manager. “The material is also moisture-wicking, so it pulls moisture away from the body, removing and reducing thermal burden, while increasing mobility and comfort levels. When it all comes together, there’s a direct correlation and improvement to the physiological effects on the pilot.”

A combination of four layers can be used to support pilots in the face of natural elements and a wide range of mission sets. This includes a thermal undergarment for cold weather protection, a water-resistant environmental protection layer, a chemical/biological/radiological resistant layer and the coverall, which provides heat and flame protection.

While the new system will require additional familiarize training events for AFE Airmen, less man hours will be required to sustain and service the equipment. Developments, such as the new floatation device, make this possible, as it does not require sensitive munitions to activate and can be transported and handled without risks of explosive reactions.

According to Medeiros, the Hawaiian Raptors are projected to receive the IAE during the first half of 2020.

“Initially I think the buildup process is going to be quite tedious,” said Davidson. “It’s a big task to take on, but I think once the supplies are delivered and we’re all set up it’s going to be an amazing product for us to use.”

Story by SrA John Linzmeier 

154th Wing Public Affairs

563d RQG Airmen Rescue Injured Mexican Fishermen

Saturday, July 20th, 2019

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. —

Airmen from Davis-Monthan Air Force Base’s 563d Rescue Group traveled more than 1700 miles, to save two critically injured Mexican fishermen onboard the Mazatun fishing vessel, July 10, 2019.

 The fishermen were injured when their vessel’s crane collapsed more than 1300 miles southwest of San Diego in international waters at approximately 8 p.m., July 9. Fishing nets obstructed Mazatun’s propellers during the incident making the boat unable to transit under its own power. The two severely injured fishermen were transferred to Mazatun’s sister ship, Tamara, who began making the three day journey to the nearest land, a Mexican naval outpost on Socorro Island located more than approximately 840 miles away.

 Due to the severity of the injuries and the ship’s isolated location, an urgent request was made for the specialized skills of U.S. Air Force Rescue. In response, the 563d RQG deployed multiple HC-130J Combat King II aircraft from the 79th Rescue Squadron to Tamara as it sailed to Socorro Island, July 10. Pararescuemen from the 48th Rescue Squadron parachuted from the HC-130J into the ocean. They intercepted and boarded the Tamara, and provided trauma care for the injured fishermen. They quickly stabilized the patients and offered continued care for the rest of the voyage to Socorro Island.

 “The relationship that was built with the captain of the ship allowed a seamless integration of our PJs medical capabilities to be able to provide the best treatment for the two injured fishermen,” said Capt John Conner, 48th RQS flight commander of flight 3. “It also allowed us the opportunity to work how we were going to transfer the patient on the ship to Socorro Island. That relationship was key.”

 Tamara reached Socorro harbor Friday evening, July 12. The pararescuemen transferred the fishermen to the Mexican naval medical clinic on the island where they would stay overnight. The next day an air ambulance transported them to Mazatlan, Mexico for further treatment.

 “The unsaid skill Air Force Rescue offers is the ability to solve difficult problems in a timely fashion. This mission highlights rescue professionals’ ability to network within the 563d RQG, 355th Wing and a greater Tucson medical community to solve an incredibly difficult problem, and continue solving problems throughout the mission’s execution which can be seen by the infil methods, follow-on aerial resupply, and transfer of care/exfil conditions,” said Captain Michael Erickson, 48th RQS director of operations. “Air Force Rescue’s successful execution of the mission demonstrates one of the ways Davis-Monthan’s culture of readiness and problem solving skills can support the greater joint force and our mission partners.”

 “This is the longest domestic rescue the 563d RQG has accomplished,” said Lt. Col. Scott Williams, 79th RQS commander. “The unique nature and location of the accident required specialized care, and I’m proud of the job our entire team did to ensure these men returned home to their families.”

By A1C Kristine Legate, 355th Wing Public Affairs

Tyndall AFB leads way in authorizing shorts on flight line

Thursday, July 18th, 2019

TYNDALL AIR FORCE BASE, Fla. —

Working any job on the flight line can be an arduous task, but scorching heat and thick humidity can easily raise the temperature to triple digits along the long strip of pavement before sunrise.

Chief Master Sgt. Brent Salvadori, 325th Maintenance Group (MXG) superintendent, devised a way over the past 18 months to keep Airmen comfortable in the heat, without sacrificing mission accomplishment.

The 325th MXG Airmen are officially approved to wear shorts on the flight line when the temperature exceeds 80 degrees outside of a climate controlled area.

“When asked the question, ‘Should I?’ my response is simple, ‘It’s what my Airmen want, and this is what Chiefs do,” said Salvadori. “We make things happen for our Airmen. This who we are, and this is what we do.”

The idea originated from the 95th Aircraft Maintenance Unit deployment to Al Dhafra Air Base in southwest Asia, said Salvadori. The AMU was permitted to wear shorts while they were deployed and upon return Salvadori reached out for the local guidance authorizing Al Dhafra’s shorts to integrate them at home station. 

“After review, it was time to roll up my sleeves and get to work,” said Salvadori. “It was a long journey, as with any time you try to change something this drastic. But, when you peel the onion back, our fellow aircraft maintenance contractors and depot civilians have been wearing shorts in the same industrial environment while performing the same maintenance actions. So, why not Airmen?”

The shorts are incredibly beneficial and serve as a cooler alternative to wear during the day while the heat and humidity is unbearable, said SrA Michael Conard, 325th MXS Aerospace Ground Equipment journeyman.

Through this effort other bases, such as Nellis Air Force Base in Nevada, Homestead Air Reserve Base in Florida, Beale AFB and Edwards AFB in California and Joint Base Charleston in South Carolina are utilizing this idea for their flight lines.

This new attempt at innovation for flight line Airmen embodies their motto of #AWESOME: Always With Excellence Supporting Our Mission Everyday.

By Senior Airman Kevin Tanenbaum, 325th Fighter Wing