Protonex Technology Corp

Archive for the ‘As Seen On Facebook’ Category

Because we don’t lose enough tools already

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

From my friend and inspiration, Tom Fuller.

CTT Solutions – Cover, Concealment and Vehicles

Sunday, April 16th, 2017

When the topic of gunfighting, and fighting around vehicles in particular, comes up, there are a few guys I listen to. One of them is Mike Pannone of CTT Solutions. There’s a lot of bad info out. Here, Mike reminds us of the basics in order to counter some of it.

I think this needs to be readdressed with all the “vehicles is all about shooting through the glass and shooting from the front seat” crap. Vehicle fighting is about tactics and angles.

Cover, Concealment and Vehicles


It is important to have common definitions of common terms or further debate is senseless. Below are the definitions for cover and concealment taken from FM 21-75 COMBAT SKILLS OF THE SOLDIER:
“COVER- Cover gives protection from bullets, fragments of exploding rounds, flame, nuclear effects, and biological and chemical agents.
CONCEALMENT-Concealment is anything that hides you from enemy observation. Concealment does not protect you from enemy fire”
Below are generally accepted definitions-
Obstacle- any item or thing that blocks one’s way or prevents or hinders progress
Terrain- the physical features of a tract of land
Vehicle- A device or structure for transporting persons or things; a conveyance
***From a tactical perspective this is only true when it is moving. If static, a vehicle is an Obstacle and can be either Cover or Concealment. ***
From RTC 350-1XX (Ranger Regimental Training Circular) at the unclassified level.
Close Quarters Battle (CQB)- As per 75th Ranger Regiment “Close Quarter Battle is a planned or well-rehearsed surgical small unit tactic, technique and procedure which encompasses the 4 principles of surprise, speed, violence of action and a fail-safe breech on a built up or enclosed structure.” This is separate and different from a vehicle ambush where the vehicle once stopped is dealt with tactically no differently than other terrain.
The concept of a vehicle as some special item is often misplaced. From a tactical perspective it is only a vehicle when it is moving. When static it is part of the terrain and may offer cover, concealment or just function as an obstacle. Overwhelmingly in engagements around vehicles the best option is to move from it. A non-armored vehicle affords different and inconsistent levels of ballistic protection based on the angles of engagement and the weapons system being employed against them. Since a vehicle sits off the ground, aside from upward or downward sloping terrain, high curbs or other manmade features on the threat side, they do not protect the feet and lower legs. Injuries to the lower extremities will cause what the military calls a “mobility kill”. Once mobility is lost the likelihood of success is slim without outside intervention. The experienced combatant i.e. military member, LEO or trained citizen for that matter must understand that a vehicle, except in the narrowest of circumstances does not afford cover as defined. There is no such thing as “pretty good cover” or “partial cover” there is “cover” or what I will call enhanced concealment which means you can hide behind it but it may or may not stop incoming fire reliably. If it cannot definitively stop bullets, then by definition it is not cover… that’s just a fact. With that established, anything between you and the threat is better than nothing, so I am not saying a vehicle can’t protect you in some ways. What I am saying is that a vehicle should not be viewed overwhelmingly as cover nor as some special item in the scope of tactical considerations. Another topic I hear talk about is the idea that glass can be cover in some instances. If we teach people to shoot out through glass at threats, then I think that neuters the argument right there. The concept of pillars being points of cover is patently false as well since one cannot claim that pillars though they may afford a level of enhanced ballistic protection will keep you from being shot. They are too narrow and are surrounded by either glass or open air if the windows are down or have been shot out. If you can’t hide your entire body behind it, then it’s not cover. Outside of luck and bad threat marksmanship, hiding behind a 3”-9” wide pillar for any length of time will likely leave you injured or dead in a combative engagement. For those that shoot pillars and say “see, it stopped x or y round” here is my 2 cents; bullets generally don’t come at you in ones and twos but by the magazine. There is not enough area covered by a pillar to make it worth loitering behind as though it is genuinely safer.
From the tactical perspective there are 6 principles I adhere to in open air engagements around vehicles. These should be common sense:
A vehicle is terrain unless it is moving, then it’s a vehicle again.
Fighting around vehicles is outdoor fighting and uses standard basic infantry tactical principles. THIS IS TRUE NO MATTER WHO SIGNS YOUR PAYCHECK, WHAT UNIFORM YOU WEAR OR WHERE YOU ARE i.e. RAMMADI IRAQ OR RICHMOND VIRGINIA. This is too often conflated with Close Quarters Battle (CQB) which is a more refined form of fighting “on a built up or enclosed structure”. It requires much more training, specialized equipment and detailed rehearsals when possible.
Anything is better than nothing but very little on a soft vehicle is cover.
Use every bit of ballistic protection that the vehicle may offer but don’t assume it is cover.
Keep the biggest chunk of metal you can between you and the threat as long as you can and be looking for the next best piece of terrain. As the threat moves you move keeping the vehicle as close to directly between you as makes tactical sense.
Move as soon as you can, move before you get pinned in a spot from which you can’t move.
That’s why the second of the first three steps of the SOF targeting methodology F3EAD is (Find) Fix and is followed by Finish. If you fix someone in place, then the finishing part is only a matter of time. If you were attacked in a certain spot more than likely it’s for the distinct advantage of the attacker. By moving and changing the angles you are disrupting the plan and can regain the initiative. If it is chance contact and you are losing the initiative, again the best course of action is to change the angles on the threat to regain it.
Don’t fight from the ground unless it is the last option you have. It is too easy to lose track of an adversary and across the hood or around a car it’s really just “who gets seen first gets shot first”. If an adversary rushes the vehicle you will not be able to counter his actions in a timely manner while trying to get up. Know how to do it but understand that fighting from the ground is a last resort.
A vehicle that is not in motion is terrain and should be treated as an obstacle with enhanced concealment that provides an unpredictable level of ballistic protection. The best course of action is to immediately return the best suppressive fire you can to blunt the attack and then move as soon as is tactically prudent to regroup and counter-attack or withdraw. Changing the angles changes their plan and changes the fight.
– Mike Pannone

LaRue Tactical – Limited-Edition FDE 7.62 Heavy-Barreled PredatAR Rifle

Tuesday, April 11th, 2017

Recently several readers have brought up LaRue Tactical’s recent 1st place showing at the USASOC Sniper Comp. They recently announced a second release of their Limited-Edition FDE 7.62 Heavy-Barreled PredatAR Rifle on Facebook. Below is their post, and yes, it looks like owner Mark LaRue is keeping number 500 all to himself.

By popular demand, we’ve made the 2nd release of last year’s Limited-Edition 7.62 “Heavy-Barreled” PredatAR, in FDE.

The first 125 units (match-numbered on the upper and lower) sold at high noon on New Year’s Day 2016 in 4 minutes flat.

For those of you who know the “Costa Edition” 5.56 Rifle, this 7.62 offering closely follows the same configuration. It beautifully combines the popular and lightweight PredatAR chassis with our 16″ heavy LaRue Barrel. If you have a Costa and want a matching serial number, let us know … we are trying to accommodate.

Each Upper Receiver, Lower Receiver, and Handguard is finished in FDE.
Selected black components and black GAP rail covers provide dramatic contrast.

The 2nd release comprises Serial numbers 126 – 499.

Please pardon my reach, but the 500th one is mine.

This will go hot at high noon Central Time Wednesday April 12th. Go take a look now, kick the tires, even if you are not interested, as that will leave bandwidth for those that are to crowd in and make their buy on Wednesday.

If you are wondering about LaRue accuracy, the 1st place finishers at the USASOC 2017 Military Sniper Competition won 2 weeks ago with a pair of LaRue rifles. That makes two years in a row LaRue rifles took 1st Place.

www.larue.com/predatar-762-16-heavy-barrel-fde

For those ordering a rifle, there will be a follow-on post-sale offering of great accessories, at great prices.

Sneak Peek – PDW’s Billet EDC Valet Tray

Sunday, April 9th, 2017

The SPD Edition RESCO UDT dive watch nested perfectly in PDW’s Billet EDC Valet Tray.

A modern solution to organize your core EDC items. Precision CNCed in California from aerospace grade aluminum billet with a clear anodized finish and replaceable G10 liners.

Coming Soon from Prometheus Design Werx.

We’ve All Experienced This

Sunday, April 9th, 2017

Brought to you by Gun Grabbing Memes on Facebook.

Magpul Developed a 60-Round Quad Magazine

Thursday, April 6th, 2017


Quad Mag Prototype, 60-Round Capacity 2009

Shortly after the introduction of the original PMAG, Magpul began working on increased capacity solutions. The “Quad” or “Coffin” mag concept never delivered the reliability in rough handling and adverse conditions that they require from their magazine products, and so the design never made it into production. Lessons learned during this program eventually fed into the D-60 program.

Hodge Defense Systems Handguards and Upper Receivers Available Now From O P Tactical

Friday, March 17th, 2017

I often hear that Hodge parts are as rare as rocking horse dung, so when I find out Wedge Lock Rails and Upper Receivers are in stock somewhere I figure I’d better warn you.

Made from 7075-T6 Aluminum, these genuine Hodge Defense components are ultra strong, and allow the rails to be extremely slim. Combined with the included Titanium barrel nut and you have one of the strongest, thinnest, and lightest systems on the market. SLR GB-7 Pin Micro Gas Blocks designed to work with the rail system are also in stock.

www.optactical.com

PPTranger Puts The Modern Profession Of Arms Into Perspective 

Monday, March 13th, 2017

pptranger.blogspot.com

Dear SMA, Please Make Marksmanship A Priority For ALL Soldiers

Wednesday, March 8th, 2017


Maj. Gen. Darrell K. Williams, commanding general, CASCOM and Fort Lee, fires his 9mm semi-automatic pistol during qualifications today at the installation range complex. Williams joined a handful of Soldiers who fulfilled their yearly weapons qualification at the facility. (Source: Ft Lee Facebook Page)

Frank Proctor On His Y Notch Sights

Wednesday, January 25th, 2017

“This picture is pretty close to what a shooter sees when shooting my Y Notch sights. I designed them for improved accuracy with less room for error and maximum speed. They have been working pretty good for me and I’m just a barely average shooter with not much experience.”

www.wayofthegun.us/proctor-y-notch-sight-set