G-Code

Archive for the ‘Boots’ Category

CANSEC 2017 – Lowa Task Force Camino GTX Coming Soon Exclusively Through Milbrook Tactical

Thursday, June 1st, 2017

Millbrook Tactical worked with Lowa to introduce a Task Force variant of the popular Camino hiking boot. In addition to producing it in Black, they also made a change to the sole.


UPPER: Nubuck Leather
LINING: Waterproof GORE-TEX CLIMATE CONTROL
TONGUE STUD/X-LACING
C4 TONGUE
FLEX LACING
FLEXFIT
FOOTBED: Balance Comfort
MIDSOLE: PU with SPS Cushion & Fluke Technology
OUTSOLE: VIBRAM
STABILIZER: 5mm Nylon Heel/3mm Forefoot
WEIGHT: 1550 grams

Coming soon, exclusively to Millbrook Tactical.

Rampart Range Day 2017 – Aku Pilgrim HL GTX

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

The Pilgrim HL GTX is a Gore-Tex lined, high leg version of the popular mid-height, unlined Pilgrim DS boot. Offered in Black and this Brown variant, they are sized 7-12 half sizes and 13.

Available through Rampart.

Tactical Research by Belleville Announces the Release of Its New Line of Quick Reaction Force (QRF) Military & Public Safety Boots

Tuesday, May 23rd, 2017

Belleville, IL. May 15, 2017 – Tactical Research by Belleville® introduces a new & unique boot series for the both the Military and Public Safety markets that addresses the needs and actions of rapid responders frequently involved in developing situations – the Quick Reaction Force (QRF) Boot Series.

Designed to address the infil & exfil operations of a Quick Reaction Force (QRF) team in mind, The QRF Series of boots offer a unique and purposeful option for when movement is essential. With design and performance influences from the outdoor trekking and approach shoe category, the QRF Series integrates an aggressive, lace-to-toe closure system; an integrated medial side fast rope channel with high friction rubber for controlled descent; and low drop soling system to enhance performance in multiple environments.

In addition, the QRF series includes:

-An exclusive long-wearing RAKKASAN rubber outsole for enhanced slip resistance and grip

-Removable, dual density Ortholite® footbed with high rebound memory foam and heel cup stabilizer

-An aero-spacer hydrophilic mesh lining for superior moisture management & breathability

Available June 2017, the QRF Series will be offered in 6 styles: 8” & 6” Coyote Brown; 8” Sage Green; 8” side zip, 8” waterproof & 6” Black

For more information about the Tactical Research QRF Series, visit www.bellevilleboot.com.

Altama’s OTB Maritime Assault  Boot Wins NAUMD’s Best Footwear Innovation Award

Sunday, May 7th, 2017

THE MOST ANTICIPATED TACTICAL FOOTWEAR OF 2017

OTB Maritime Assault Boot, Winner of NAUMD’s Best Footwear Innovation Award

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Morristown, TN – May 5, 2017 Since its first public appearance at SHOT Show this past January, the Altama OTB Maritime Assault boot has been widely discussed at tactical gear shows worldwide. The OTB Maritime Assault Boot was designed specifically to replace the old school canvas style shoes commonly used by Navy SEALs during OTB operations. At first glance, the OTB Maritime Assault Boot looks like a typical sneaker, however closer review will show what makes the shoe worthy of elite operators.

Strategically placed drainage ports at the forefoot flex points of the boot helps water drain immediately after exiting the body of water. The water friendly materials feature low absorption and faster dry times. The SEAL rubber sticky outsoles allow for extra grip on slick surfaces and full length one piece ABS shank provides stability and support – making it easier to climb caving ladders. The slim design is specifically for the boots to fit into dive fins used by militaries worldwide. Inevitably, the OTB Maritime Assault has already adopted the nickname “Combat Chucks.”

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“We are honored that our boot won the Best Footwear Innovation Award at NAUMD. We want the OTB Maritime Assault Boot to be known as the most badass sneaker in the world,” said Kevin Cole, CEO of the The Original Footwear Co. The OTB Maritime Assault will be released in low cut and mid height versions. The boots will initially be available in Black, Coyote and Original Multicam®. Cole said, “We’ll be releasing more colors at a later date.”

Customers can expect to the OTB Maritime Assault boots on shelves and online beginning in August, 2017.

www.altama.com

Warrior West – Belleville Quick Reaction Force

Thursday, April 20th, 2017

This is a sneak peek of Belleville’s new Quick Reaction Force line under their foreign sourced, Tactical Research brand. There is some climbing shoe DNA in this line, with to-toe lacing and full rubber toes. The sole also has a fast rope instep. In addition to the more traditional Black, Coyote and Sage, there is a more low-viz two color Bark/Sand option, which I prefer.

www.bellevilleboot.com

Propper Awarded New Army Boot Contracts

Wednesday, April 12th, 2017


St. Charles, MO — Propper International has won two new contracts to supply hot weather boots to the United States Army and the Afghanistan military. The new three-year contract was awarded by the Defense Logistics Agency after an extensive bidding process.

The boots will come in two colors: tan for the US Army and black for the Afghanistan military. The contracts, totaling just over $48 million, will run through fiscal 2020. The boots will be manufactured in Propper’s Puerto Rico facilities.

“The new boot contract extends Propper’s five-decade commitment to those who serve,” said Anderson Ward, SVP of Global Supply Chain Operations for Propper. “We are proud to continue the long-standing tradition of supplying our fighting forces with dependable and rugged gear.”

Propper has proudly supplied the US military with uniforms and gear since 1967. Today Propper is the country’s largest supplier of ACUs and BDUs.

www.propper.com

Ft Bragg Warfighter Expo – Stabil Grippers

Thursday, March 16th, 2017

I’ve shown you Stabil Ice removable outsoles in the past for use on snow and ice. Manufacturer Stabil also offers Stabil Grippers, to help keep you on your feet on slippery, wet surfaces, like found at swimming pools and maintenance facilities as well as at dining facilities and hospitals.

They slip right over your standard footwear and are easily removed when not needed.

Stabil Grippers are available to government customers exclusively through ADS.  

US Army Unveils New Jungle Combat Boot

Monday, March 6th, 2017

The US Army is poised to issue a new Jungle Combat Boot based on an RFI to industry just five months ago in October. This is an impressive example of what can happen when the Army works with industry. Well done!

Let’s hope the manufacturers get these out there soon for private purchase by Soldiers not assigned to the 25th ID.

WASHINGTON (Army News Service) — The standard issue combat boot most Soldiers wear today, the one most commonly worn in Iraq and Afghanistan, is great for sandy dunes, hot dry weather, and asphalt. But it’s proven not so good in hot and wet environments. So the Army has developed a new jungle boot that some Soldiers will see this year.

Last September, Chief of Staff of the Army Gen. Mark A. Milley directed the Army to come up with a plan to outfit two full brigade combat teams in Hawaii, part of the 25th Infantry Division there, with a jungle boot. The Army had already been testing commercial jungle boots at the time — with mixed results — but didn’t have a specialized jungle boot, so Program Executive Officer Soldier, headquartered at Fort Belvoir, Virginia, had to get a plan together to make it happen.

By October of last year, the Army had made a request to industry to find out what was possible, and by December, contracts were awarded to two boot manufacturers in the United States to build a little more than 36,700 jungle-ready combat boots — enough to outfit both full IBCTs in Hawaii.

“This is important to the Army, and important to Soldiers in a hot, high-humidity, high-moisture area,” said Lt. Col. John Bryan, product manager for Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment, with PEO Soldier. “We are responding as quickly as we possibly can, with the best available, immediate capability, to get it on Soldiers’ feet quickly, and then refine and improve as we go.”

MIXING LEGACY WITH TECH

Right now, the new jungle boot the Army developed will be for Soldiers at the 25th ID in Hawaii — primarily because there are actually jungles in Hawaii that Soldiers there must contend with. The new boots look remarkably similar to the current boots Soldiers wear — they are the same color for instance. And the boots, which Bryan said are called the “Army Jungle Combat Boot” or “JCB” for short, sport a variety of features drawn from both the legacy M1966 Vietnam-era jungle boot and modern technology.

The M1966 Jungle Boot — which featured a green cotton fabric upper with a black leather toe that could be polished, had a solid rubber sole which Soldiers reportedly said had no shock-absorbing capability. The new boot uses a similar tread, or “outsole,” as the M1966 “Panama style” — to shed mud for instance and provide great traction, but the added midsole is what makes it more comfortable and shock absorbing, said Albert Adams, who works at the Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center.

The outsole of the new boot is connected to the leather upper via “direct attach,” Adams said. That’s a process where a kind of liquid foam is poured between the rubber outsole and leather boot upper. It’s “a lot like an injection molding process,” he said.

The foam layer between the rubber sole and the upper portion of the boot not only provides greater shock absorbing capability, but he said it also keeps out microbes in hot, wet environments that in the past have been shown to eat away at the glues that held older boots together. So the new boots won’t separate at the soles, he said. “It provides a high level of durability, and it also adds cushioning.”

Also part of the new boot is a textile layer that prevents foreign items from puncturing through the sole of the boot and hurting a Soldier’s foot, Adam’s said. The M1966 boot accomplished that with a steel plate. The new boot has a ballistic fabric-like layer instead.

Staff Sgt. Joshua Morse, an instructor at the Jungle Operations Training Center in Hawaii, said the puncture resistance is welcome. He said punji sticks, familiar to Vietnam War veterans, are still a problem for Soldiers, for instance.

“They use these punji pits for hunting purposes,” he said. “In Brunei, you are literally in the middle of nowhere in this jungle, and there are natives that live in that area, and still hunt in that area, and it can be an issue.” And in mangrove swamps, he said, “you can’t see anything. You don’t know what’s under your feet at all. There are a lot of sharp objects in there as well.”

The new JCB also features a heel with a lower height than the M1966 model, to prevent snags on things like vines in a jungle environment. That prevents tripping and twisted ankles. Among other things, the boot also has additional drainage holes to let water out if it becomes completely soaked, speed laces so that Soldiers can don and doff the boots more quickly, a redesigned upper to make the boots less tight when they are new, an insert that helps improve water drainage, and a lining that makes the boot breath better and dry faster than the old boot.

“You’re going to be stepping in mud up to your knees or higher, and going across rivers regularly,” Adams said. “So once the boot is soaked, we need it to be able to dry quickly as well.”

FEEDBACK FORMED FINAL DESIGN

Morse has already been wearing and evaluating early versions of the JCB and said he thinks the efforts made by the Army toward providing him with better footwear are spot on.

“The designs were conjured up in a lab somewhere, and they were brought out here, and the main focus was the field test with us,” Morse said. “A lot of us have worn these boots for a year now, different variants of the boots. And all the feedback that we’ve put into this, and given to the companies, they have come back and given us better products every single time.”

Morse said he hadn’t initially worn the new jungle boots that he had been asked to evaluate. On a trip to Brunei, he recalled, he went instead with what he was familiar with and what he trusted — a pair of boots he’d worn many times, the kind worn by Soldiers in the deserts of Iraq and Afghanistan.

“I wore a pair of boots I’d had for a couple of years,” he said. “I wore them in Brunei and I had trench foot within a week. But then I thought — I have this brand new pair of test boots that they asked me to test; they are not broken in, but I’m going to give them a shot. I put them on. After 46 days soaking wet, non-stop, my feet were never completely dry. But I wore those boots, and I never had a problem again.”

The Army didn’t design the new JCB in a vacuum. Instead, it worked with Solders like Morse to get the requirements and design just right — to meet the needs of Soldiers, said Capt. Daniel Ferenczy, the assistant product manager for Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment.

“We worked with Soldiers to come up with this boot. We take what Soldiers want and need, we boil that down to the salient characteristics, hand that over to our science and technology up at Natick; they work with us and industry, the manufacturing base, to come up with this product,” Ferenczy said. “This is a huge win, a great win story for the Army, because it was such a quick turnaround. Industry did a fantastic job. Our product engineers are also top of the line. And we had a ton of Soldier feedback … we really dealt very closely with what the Soldier needs to get where we are.”

In March, the Army will begin fielding the current iteration of the JCB to Soldiers in the first of two brigade combat teams in Hawaii. During that fielding, the boots will be available in sizes 7-12. In June, the Army will begin fielding the JCB to the second BCT — this time with a wider array of sizes available: sizes 3-16, in narrow, regular, wide and extra wide. They will also go back and take care of those Soldiers from the initial fielding who didn’t get boots due to their size not being available. A third fielding in September will ensure that all Soldiers from the second fielding have boots. Each Soldier will get two pairs of JCBs.

In all, for this initial fielding — meant to meet the requirement laid out last September by the Army’s chief of staff — more than 36,700 JCBs will be manufactured.

By December, the Army will return to Hawaii to ask Soldiers how those new boots are working out for them.

“Al Adams will lead a small group and go back to 25th ID, to conduct focus groups with the Soldiers who are wearing these boots and get their feedback — good and bad,” said Scott A. Fernald, an acquisition technician with PEO Soldier. “From there, the determination will be made, if we had a product we are satisfied with, or if we need to go back and do some tweaking.”

AUTHORIZED FOR ALL

Fernald said that sometime between April and June of 2018, a final purchase description for the JCB will be developed — based on feedback from Soldiers that wore it. He said he expects that in fiscal year 2019, an indefinite delivery/indefinite quantity contract will be signed with multiple vendors to produce the final version of the JCB for the Army.

Bryan said the JCB, when it becomes widely available, will be wearable by all Soldiers who want to wear it — even if they don’t work in a jungle.

“From the get-go we have worked with the G-1 … to make sure we all understood the Army wear standards for boots,” he said. “One of the pieces of feedback we have gotten from Soldiers before they wear them, is they look a lot like our current boots. That’s by design. These will be authorized to wear.”

While the JCB will be authorized for wear by any Solider, Bryan made it clear that there will only be some Soldiers in some units who have the JCB issued to them. And right now, those decisions have not been made. For Soldiers who are not issued the JCB, if they want to wear it they will need to find it and purchase it on their own.

“We are not directing commercial industry to sell them,” Bryan said. “But if they build to the specification we’ve given them for our contract, they can sell them commercially and Soldiers are authorized to wear them.”

(US Army Photos by David Camm)