TYR Tactical

Archive for the ‘Camo’ Category

TRU-SPEC – Tactical Response Uniform Now Offered in A-TACS iX Camo

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

TRU-SPEC and A-TACS Camo are proud to introduce the full T.R.U. System is now available in new A-TACS iX Camo. The T.R.U. is the intelligent evolution of the BDU and is loosly based off of the U.S. Military’s ACU, but goes beyond spec with dozens of durability and performance enhancements. Every SWAT, SRT and special response unit needs a quality, full featured uniform and this uniform fits the bill perfectly. All TRU fabrics are manufactured in the U.S. in government approved factories and are recommended by the NTOA.

T.R.U. Pants

Cut from ultra color-fast vat-dyed NyCo for maximum fade resistance, Features include a Drawstring waist with button fly, 1″ wide belt loops with 2¼” openings, Two extra deep front slash pockets with reinforced openings, Reinforced seat, Hook & loop closure pocket flaps and Two easy access slanted cargo pockets with drain holes, 5″ x 5″ hidden pocket and elastic drawstring with cord lock for secure closure. Additional features include, Reinforced knees with internal knee pockets for knee pad inserts with easy access external hook & loop openings, Two bellowed lower leg pockets with hook & loop closures and Improved “stay tied” heavy drawstring leg ties.


T.R.U. Shirt

Cut from ultra color-fast vat-dyed NyCo for maximum fade resistance, Features include an Adjustable hook & loop mandarin collar can be worn up or down to protect the neck and keep out debris, Zippered and hook & loop front placket for smooth uniform appearance, Bi-swing back, Hook & loop faced shoulder pockets for patches & skill tabs and 2-slanted chest pockets with hook & loop closures for easy access under body armor, Additional Features include, Reinforced elbow pad pockets with external openings for elbow pad inserts with hook & loop openings, Pen/pencil stalls on sleeve, Adjustable hook & loop cuff and also includes 3-pieces of hook & loop that can be sewn on for name & rank patches.

T.R.U. ¼ Zip Combat Shirt

The same durability and protection of a combat jacket with the comfort of the original combat shirt and the addition of a 1/4 zip front with mandarin collar for added protection. Based off the current military design that helps reduce the severity of burn injuries while providing a more comfortable uniform top under body armor and vests. The body of the shirt is made from 60% cotton, 40% CORDURA® Baselayer fabric that meets the No Melt, No Drip thermal requirements officers demand while keeping them cool and dry by wicking away moisture from the body., Features include, body construction from No Melt, No Drip CORDURA® Baselayer fabric, a 60/40 cotton nylon blend that not only reduces the severity of burn injuries and helps protect against flash fires, but also breathes, wicks away moisture and dries quickly, 1/4 zip front mandarin collar; zipper has a cover hood for comfort, Seamless, reinforced shoulders to minimize rubbing and chafing, Storage pockets on sleeves and Loop on sleeve pockets for attaching name, rank and flag patches. Additional Features include, Glint tape holder for IR tape, Reinforced elbow patches, Gusseted sleeves, Pen/pencil stalls and Hook & loop cuff closures.

TRU-SPEC is also offering a Military cut Boonie Cap in this introductory line. For pricing and additional purchase information, visit www.truspec.com. T.R.U.s can also be purchased in A-TACS iX, A-TACS AU and A-TACS FG from most authorized TRU-SPEC Retailers or at www.truspec.com.

Congrats To Guy Cramer, CEO Of HyperStealth Biotechnology Corp

Monday, May 2nd, 2016


Wealth and Finance International magazine (with a global audience of 130,000 subscribers) just awarded Guy Cramer of Hyperstealth Biotechnology Corp. “CEO of the Year in Canada for 2016”!

Can You Identify All Of The Camo Patterns In This Photo?

Sunday, May 1st, 2016

Although I’m loving the multiple camouflage patterns in this photo, check out the Kenai Chest Holster at the center of his chest. It was designed for any outdoor activity where traditional on the belt carry will be uncomfortable or undesirable. 100% US Made with USA sourced parts. Check it out www.gunfightersinc.com.

Crye Precision Files Appeal in Recent Dismissal of Suit Against Duro Textiles

Friday, April 29th, 2016

Yesterday, Crye Precision filed an appeal to Federal Judge Denise Cote’s ruling last week to dismiss Crye Precision’s lawsuit against Duro Textiles.

Warrior Culture Gear Offering Caps In ODG Camo Patterns

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

Warrior Culture Gear has kicked full production of their Warrior Caps, line and along with the introduction of these “Operator” Style Caps they are offering Orion Design Group’s Lupus and Ursus patterns, with Vipera on the way.

You’ll notice two styles. One features Velcro and the other the WCG logo. They are manufactured in Cleveland, Ohio out of US Mil-Spec NYCO.

www.warriorculturegear.com/collections/accessories

Court Dismisses Crye Precision’s Suit Against Duro Textiles

Tuesday, April 26th, 2016

On Friday, 22 April, 2016, Federal Judge Denise L. Cote published a ruling, granting Duro Textiles motion for summary judgement and dismissing with prejudice Crye Precision’s remaining claims against Duro Textiles, stemming from a lawsuit filed against Duro in early 2015. This is actually a second lawsuit although the initial suit was filed in late 2014 and withdrawn in early 2015.

Specifically, the Judge dismissed three specific allegations in this suit; breach of contract, trade dress infringement and common law unfair competition arising from Duro’s printing of a camouflage pattern owned by the US Government.

Crye Precision’s MultiCam licensing agreement was central to their claims against Duro. Duro last signed such an agreement with Crye in 2012 and once it had expired in 2014, and Duro began printing the Army’s OCP, legal actions commenced.

Below is the paragraph 3(h), in question.

According to New York law, this clause from the 2012 agreement is unenforceable due to reasons stipulated in the ruling. Furthermore, the judge ruled that it was too broad in scope. At face value, it seems like a pretty straightforward ruling by the court, until you consider that it could create a situation where the premise it is based upon fundamentally changes.  The full order, seen below, is quite detailed and worth the read.

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Click on image to open PDF

To be sure, this is a victory for Duro, but perhaps a bittersweet one. Duro was essentially a lone horse in printing OCP for the Army. Now, they are sure to see competition for this business in the future. What’s more, the Army may well lose control of the pattern it created for use in place of MultiCam. Whether the Army likes it or not, we may see commercial OCP, or really close copies, by Christmas.

Here’s why. Much to the chagrin of those of us watching from the sidelines, the Judge’s decision does not declare whether MultiCam and OCP (Scorpion W2) are similar. Rather, the court is very clear that Duro is just printing what the Army paid them to print; namely, OCP and claims that the government can tell the difference.

Judge Cote dismissed Crye Precision’s claim of trade dress infringement. The court’s ruling may well have set creating about an interesting situation. Consider this:

The Government is the creator and only purchaser of Scorpion W2. It is a sophisticated consumer, as its creation of Scorpion W2 and its announced switch from MUTLICAM in 2014 evidences. Duro’s only sales of Scorpion W2 have been for the Government, specifically to Government contractors and subcontractors in the supply chain for the U.S. Army. These contractors order Scorpion W2 from Duro by name. Thus, while MULTICAM and Scorpion W2 compete in the same Government sales market, there is no likelihood of actual confusion on the part of the Government or its contractors.

It’s the second and third order, or should I say “disorder” effects that will be interesting. For example, what if the consumer is no longer just the US Army but also commercial customers. Could that expanded consumer group tell the difference between these two patterns?

This exact situation may be additional fallout from this ruling, and it may not just affect Crye Precision. By declaring the competition clause of Crye’s licensing agreement void, could printers, licensed or not, begin to make counterfeit versions of MultiCam, or for that matter OCP, consequence free?

Although Judge Cote declared the provisions of Crye Precision’s licensing agreement too broad, you have to wonder how specific they would have to be to satisfy the court and protect the pattern(s). As far as I know, current licensees are under a newer 2014 version of the contract which may contain updated language that already addresses the court’s concerns and were signed under different circumstances than the long-standing agreements with Duro. It must be noted that this ruling by Judge Cote is specific to the situation with Duro.

It is yet to be seen whether Crye Precision will appeal the ruling, but it doesn’t stop them from defending their IP on other fronts. Also, although many are concerned with license fees for the printing of both MultiCam and OCP. This ruling doesn’t address them. Regardless, the bottom line here is that Crye is going to have to sue the US Army if it wants to ultimately settle the MultiCam vs OCP question. We’ll keep you posted if we hear anything.

Dutch SF Camo in Mali

Saturday, April 23rd, 2016

 

This photo depicts members of the Dutch SF contingent to Mali wearing the FR digital camouflage uniforms from FibroTex we showed you last month. You may also notice a G-Wagen being sling-loaded.

Rogue American Apparel – Blue Grey Poseidon Camo

Sunday, April 17th, 2016

 

This is RAA’s exclusive new Poseidon camouflage which they’ve been refining over the past year.  The adjustable cap is made from ripstop fabric and incorprates an embroidered American flag to the front as well as a snake and skull log at the rear. 

Made in USA. Same day shipping.

www.rogueamericanapparel.com/poseidon-hat