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Archive for the ‘CIED’ Category

Marine Corps makes history with mine plow prototype for Assault Breacher Vehicle

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

The Marine Corps’ Assault Breacher Vehicle made history last year when it conducted its first amphibious landing with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during a long-range breaching exercise in the western United States.

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, prepare to load an Assault Breacher Vehicle onto a Landing Craft Utility at Camp Pendleton, California. All vehicles were loaded onto LCUs then transported to the USS Rushmore to conduct the first amphibious landing in an ABV with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

In December 2017, Marine Corps Systems Command used Exercise Steel Knight as an opportunity to test the Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype for the first time. Steel Knight is a division-level exercise designed to enhance command and control, and interoperability with the 1st Marine Division, its adjacent units and naval support forces.

In the future, this piece of equipment will make it easier for Marines to land and deploy an ABV from a Navy Landing Craft Utility boat to the shore to complete their mission.

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Rhita Daniel)

“Our legacy Full Width Mine Plow on the ABV could not fit onto an LCU because it was too wide,” said Timothy Barrons, ABV project officer for Engineer Systems at Marine Corps Systems Command. “The prototype we are testing fills a current capability gap and gives commanders the flexibility to use multiple surface connectors to get ABVs in the fight.”

The modified plow prototype is not only easier to transport, but safer to use, Barrons said. Once the LCU drops the bow ramp onto land, Marines can drive the ABV off the boat, open the plow and breach the area to ensure they eliminate any unsafe obstacles.

“The Assault Breacher Vehicle is the premiere breaching tool in the Marine Corps, and there is no other tool like it,” said Alvin “Tommy” West, ABV platform engineer. “It can carry two Linear Demolition Charges (commonly referred to as the line charge) on the back with over a thousand pounds of C4 explosives in each of the charge. A rocket is attached to each line charge to propel the charge, which is critical when clearing a path through mine fields.”

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

After the line charge detonates, landmines in its path are destroyed or rendered ineffective. Marines use the mine plow to sift through the mine field and push any remaining landmines off to the side, leaving a safe path for the assault force.

“This plow prototype makes the ABV transportable and gives the commander options to accomplish his tasks on the battlefield,” said Barrons. “The capability makes the force more lethal because it helps keep other combat vehicles intact and saves the lives of Marines.”

The ABV Program Team plans to take the information and feedback from Marines gathered at Steel Knight to refine the design and improve the overall performance of the modified plow. The team wants to ensure the modified plow will meet all requirements of the legacy mine plow in performance and survivability. After the redesign is completed, the articles will be tested at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center in Maryland.

“Because the plow is foldable and deals directly with explosives, it is going to take some hits, so we need to ensure it is more reliable than the legacy mine plow which was not hinged or foldable,” said West. “There is no other piece of gear in the Marine Corps that does what the ABV with the Full Width Mine Plow does. Our goal is to make the new plow even more reliable and easier to maintain.”
The ABV Program is a part of Engineer Systems under the Logistics Combat Element Systems program at Marine Corps Systems Command.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

Detonation Technology – Folding Grappling Hooks

Friday, February 19th, 2016

 

The Detonation Technology DTGH-2 and 3 Grapples features tines that fold flat so it can be tucked out of the way in a pouch or pocket, then snap open with a twist of the wrist. There are no parts to thread together or lose. Additionally, the tines aren’t too low against the center of gravity making it more appropriate for CIED use as opposed to traditional climbing grappling hooks. As you can see below, the Grapple is quite compact.

 

Thanks Gene!

detonationtechnology.com

JIDA Moves Under DTRA, Becomes JIDO

Saturday, February 6th, 2016

In 2006, DoD created the Joint Improvised Explosive Device Defeat Organization (JIEDDO) to do exactly what its title suggested. As the war dwindled down to its current level, JIEDDO was transformed to the Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Agency (JIDA). Both budget and size shrank, but the focus was expanded to include other types of unconvetional terrorist threats.

This year, JIDA will find a new home as part of the Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTRA) which traditionally focuses on CBRNE threats. JIDA will also receive a new name, Joint Improvised-Threat Defeat Organization (JIDO). Somce the organization’s focus is a bit more broad than when it was when founded in 2006, DTRA seems like a good fit.

However, the reason for the move is politically driven. The 2016 National Defense Authorization Act forbid JIDA from becoming a stand alone agency under DoD and directed it be moved to a military department or agency.

Milipol – Kirintec IED Extraction Kit

Friday, November 20th, 2015

This IED Extraction Kit from Kirintec incorporates a lightweight A-frame made from carbon fiber and aluminum and includes 120 yards of heavy duty rigging line on a winding spool along with other accessories including knife, multitool and flashlight as well as various rigging accessories such as carabiners.

  
www.kirintec.com

Iraq Purchases Husky Mine Clearance Vehicles

Friday, February 20th, 2015

Iraqi Ministry of Defense Purchases the Husky 2G from Critical Solutions International as its IED Detection & Interrogation System

Husky

Charleston, South Carolina (February 19, 2015) – Critical Solutions International (CSI) announced today that the Iraqi Ministry of Defense has purchased the Husky 2G as its Improvised Explosive Device (IED) & mine clearing vehicle. This procurement represents a critical enhancement to Iraq’s route clearance mission and its ability to maintain freedom of maneuver and oppose ISIS and other forces within Iraq.

Enhanced Capabilities That Saves Lives.

Known worldwide for its survivability and capability, the Husky 2G is equipped with the FASCAN interrogation arm used to interrogate suspected mines and Improvised Explosive Devices (IEDs). The up-graded Husky 2G is built with additional power and capability to accept future integration of additional sensors and enhancements such as the NIITEK Ground Penetrating Radar.

This contract was awarded to CSI and its partner DCD Protected Mobility, a division of DCD Group (Pty) Ltd, the OEM of the Husky. Over the past decade, the Husky family of vehicles has saved countless lives around the globe. In addition to the FASCAN International interrogation arm, the Husky 2G is also equipped with the TORC Robotics 360 Situational Awareness camera system and QinetiQ North Americas QNET, which provides the vehicle with lightweight protection from rocket-propelled grenades (RPGs). This program is valued at more than $73.5 million and will support the Iraqi military in protecting both soldiers and civilians in and around Iraq.

Two operators. Longer missions. Sophisticated sensors.

Responding to the need for longer mission duration and enhanced detection capability, the Husky 2G two-operator variant was originally developed and delivered to the U.S. Army. The addition of a second operator allows the Husky driver to focus on vehicle control and situational awareness, while the second operator monitors and analyzes the advanced sensor systems and the operational environment. The U.S. Army recognized this life-saving vehicle design with an Innovation of the Year Award for 2010.

“The Iraqi government has determined that the Husky 2G is essential to defeating their IED and mine threats and represents a significant investment in saving lives and enhancing the capability of the Iraqi military,” said Patrick Callahan, CEO of CSI. “We are honored to have been awarded this contract and are looking forward to working with the Iraqi Ministry of Defense to fully support this program and any future requirements.”

CSI is the world’s leading provider and service supporter of blast protected vehicles with land mine, improvised explosive device and unexploded ordinance detection capability. An essential supplier of the U.S. countermine and humanitarian demining community, CSI’s products lead the way in the safe detection and identification of hidden threats. For more information please visit www.c-s-i.com.