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Archive for the ‘Disruptive Tech’ Category

Army bans use of a COTS UAS system

Saturday, August 5th, 2017

Urgent operational usage of commercial electronic equipment is nothing new.  Early in the GWOT, FRS “walkie talkie” equipment was frequently purchased by individual troops or with unit funds to address a shortage of comms at the squad level.  Later, theater orders were issued prohibiting their usage due to grievous OPSEC/COMSEC issues and this shortfall was addressed with TPE (theater provided equipment) issue of ICOM and other commercial radio systems.

In a similar vein,  Army organizations have procuring  commercial hobbyist UAV systems to provide situational awareness and ISR capabilities “on the cheap.”   However, such systems introduce a multitude of operational and cyber vulnerabilities.   For the most common systems made by DJI, telemetry, audio, video, and locational data  is sent back by default to the Chinese manufacturer.

On 2 August, the US Army prohibited the use of DJI drones:

DJI-no-fly-army

 

DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY

OFFICE OF THE DEPUTY CHIEF OF STAFF, G-3/5/7

400 ARMY PENTAGON

WASHINGTON, DC 20310-0400

DAMO-AV

MEMORANDUM FOR RECORD

2 August 2017

SUBJECT: Discontinue Use of Dajiang Innovation (DJI) Corporation Unmmaned Aircraft Systems

1. References:

a. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) report, “DJI UAS Technology Threat and User Vulnerabilities,” dated 25 May 2017 (Classified).

b. Navy memorandum, “Operational Risks with Regards to DJI Family of Products,” dated 24 May 2017.

2. Background: DJI Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) products are the most widely used non-program of record commercial off-the-shelf UAS employed by the Army. The Army Aviation Engineering Directorate has issued over 300 separate Airworthiness Releases for DJI products in support of multiple organizations with a variety of mission sets. Due to increased awareness of cyber vulnerabilities associated with DJI products, it is directed that the U.S. Army halt use of all DJI products. This guidance applies to all DJI UAS and any system that employs DJI electrical components or software including, but not limited to, flight computers, cameras, radios, batteries, speed controllers, GPS units, handheld control stations, or devices with DJI software applications installed.

3. Direction: Cease all use, uninstall all DJI applications, remove all batteries/storage media from devices, and secure equipment for follow on direction.

4. Point of Contact: Headquarters, Department of the Army G-3/5/7 Aviation Directorate, 703-693-3552

JOSEPH ANDERSON
Lieutenant General, GS
Deputy Chief of Staff, G-3/5/7

Exploitation of data collected by these drones can provide an adversary with a inductive picture of friendly force operations, locations, and tempo.  Much like watching surges in pizza deliveries to headquarters buildings at night, an adversary can infer forward operations by spikes in data traffic.

While the technical specifics are beyond the scope and span of SSD, this decision is still quite relevant to our readership.

For further information, check out this article from our peers at SUASnews.

Operational Use Of Russian K2 Exoskeleton

Wednesday, August 2nd, 2017

Over the past few weeks we've shown you the Mawashi UPRISE Tactical Exoskeleton as well as a model under development by the US Army, called the Warrior Web physical augmentation suit. Both are unpowered with the commercially developed Mawashi product much closer to operationalization. We suggested during our coverage of the Army program that our troops may well face foes equipped with unpowered Exoskeletons long before the Army version was ready for use. As we now have evidence of Russian Sappers using the K-2 unpowered Exoskeleton during mine clearing operations in Syria, the probably Of that prediction just went up.


Weight 2 kg, the K-2 will support up to 50 kg, and like the UPRISE, the load is transferred down the spine, into the lower extremities and to the ground through a plate in the footwear.

Here are some demonstration videos.

Prototype Exoskeleton Suit Would Improve Soldiers’ Physical, Mental Performance

Thursday, July 27th, 2017

Earlier this week, we showed you Mawashi's UPRISE Tactical Exoskeleton. This is an Army News story on a DARPA-funded initiative to create a similar, unpowered exoskeleton. Guess which one is more mature, the commercially developed model, or the government funded offering? Considering, Mawashi started earlier on development of the UPRISE, it is available today. Unfortunately, the Army doesn't expect their's to be ready for prime time for a decade. By then, our troops may well face niche competitors on the battlefield, equipped with robotic augmentation systems.

Commercial technology development continues to outpace the US military's ability to interact with industry. All too often, we are witnessing companies who give up on the government and offer their wares to the international market. Much of the problem stems in Congress and the Executive Branch which has failed for almost a decade to adequately and reliably fund defense modernization. Furthermore, not only do our acquisition regulations need overhaul, but those serving in acquisition billets need to have a better understanding of how their actions, or inactions affect the industrial base. The military and their labs cannot go it alone, but they are rapidly painting themselves in a corner as the supply chain fades away. We've got to become smarter and faster at assessing and acquiring technologies for the Warfighter.

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Thanks to a new "suit" being developed by the DOD-funded Warrior Web program, future Soldiers will be able to march longer, carry heavier gear and improve mental sharpness.

The suit has pulleys and gears designed to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal injuries caused by the dynamic events typically experienced in the Warfighter's environment.

Dr. Courtney Webster makes adjustments to the Warrior Web physical augmentation suit from Harvard's Wyss Institute in Boston, Massachusetts. The research, funded by DARPA, and tested at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland, holds great potential, officials said. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by David McNally)

Scientists and engineers from the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have been testing variations of the suit for more than three years at the Soldier Performance and Equipment Advanced Research, or SPEAR, facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground.

"We've been primarily focusing on the physical benefits of these types of suits, but we're also interested in the cognitive benefits," said ARL researcher Dr. Angela Boynton. "We're hoping that by reducing the physical burden, that they also have the ability to put more energy into other types of tasks that involve cognitive or perceptual workload."

A Soldier wears an exosuit while on a three-mile outdoor course at a U.S. Army Research Laboratory facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The suit, which is part of the Army's Warrior Web Program has pulleys and gears designed to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal injuries caused by dynamic events typically found in the warfighter's environment. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Rob Carty)

The project, funded by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or DARPA, has many partner organizations across the DOD and academia.

The U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center, the Maneuver Center of Excellence, the Army Capabilities Integration Center and the Military Operational Medicine Research Program met at ARL's SPEAR in June for a soft "exosuit" demonstration and to discuss the path forward for the Army's Warrior Web Program.

The program, which is funded by DARPA, is coming to an end; however, researchers hope to find future collaborators to expand on the progress gained in the current program iteration.

"In the longer term, the systems have benefits to be integrated into larger Soldier systems and can be integrated with other capabilities to provide a marked advantage for our Soldiers and our warfighters in the future," said Maj. Christopher Orlowski, DARPA's Warrior Web program manager. "I think it will take at least another five to 10 years to be ready for the infantry Soldier."

A Soldier wears an exosuit while on a treadmill at a U.S. Army Research Laboratory facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, Maryland. The suit, which is part of the Army's Warrior Web Program has pulleys and gears designed to prevent and reduce musculoskeletal injuries caused by dynamic events typically found in the warfighter's environment. Researchers use the feedback gained for ongoing research and developments as they continue to refine the prototypes. (Photo Credit: U.S. Army photo by Ron Carty)

A team of researchers from Harvard's Wyss Institute in Boston, Massachusetts, led by Dr. Conor Walsh, associate professor of engineering and applied sciences at the Harvard biodesign lab, attended the meeting that was held in conjunction with ongoing testing at ARL. Walsh and his team have been working on and testing their prototypes on Soldiers since 2014.

"The meeting was a good opportunity for our team to summarize the progress we have made as part of the DARPA Warrior Web Program to other Army stakeholders and get their feedback on how they see the technology and what further work remains to continue to optimize it," Walsh said.

Walsh said the latest version of the "exosuit" tested at ARL is the result of his team's system integration efforts over the past year. He said the system is much more user friendly as compared to early prototypes and includes improved functional apparel attachments to the body, control systems that adapt to each individual, and actuation systems that are quiet and compact.

Edwin "Eddie" Davis, director of the Maneuver Battle Lab, Capabilities Development Integration Directorate Maneuver Center of Excellence, said he was impressed by what he observed and that Soldiers should have a say in what kinds of equipment they will use in combat.

"Warrior Web is a perfect example where engineers and Soldiers work together 'early and often' to develop a capability that might be useful for the future," Davis said. "It also helps speed up the technology transition and program acquisition. Soldier feedback will help frame the Warrior Web Program outcomes and future Army investment."

Henry Girolamo, NSRDEC program manager for the Warrior Web project, has been with the project since its inception.

"What we're trying to do here is collaborate, so we can keep it going in a beneficial way for the Army and the services," Girolamo said.

Girolamo noted that the SPEAR facility has been highly beneficial.

"We have an indoor lab capability where we can instrument up the Soldiers and keep them in an environment where you can just get pure data on things like treadmills, motion capture and be able to analyze everything in the lab," he said. "You can take them out on a three-mile course where it's more aligned with the environments in which they would be working. We've got the best of both worlds."

Walsh and his team agree.

"Our team has benefited greatly from working with the ARL team and Soldiers. We get to evaluate the system with potential end users who are walking significant distance on the treadmill and over ground," Walsh said. "The feedback we get also informs our ongoing research and developments as we continue to refine the prototypes. Our team is interested in furthering the scientific understanding of how to best optimize these systems for individuals as well as refining the technology by creating more integrated systems suitable for every day wear."

Researchers tested the same group of Soldiers in April and again in June, both with and without the suit, and gathered massive amounts of data.

"If you reduce the physical burden on somebody, there may be some benefits additionally to the amount of attention they can pay to their situational awareness," Boynton said.

Officials are still discussing the path forward.

"I see it as a solution-focused suite of technologies that support a wide array of Soldier issues that we are having to deal with right now," Girolamo said. "We need to iterate the technology a little bit further along to make sure we can actually do that and I know we can. We just need the funding and time to do that."

Mawashi – UPRISE Tactical Exoskeleton

Monday, July 24th, 2017

While the UPRISE™ Tactical Exoskeleton has popped up in various future soldier system program demonstrations, it was officially unveiled to the market at an offsite during SOFIC. I got a good look at it not long after, while attending CANSEC in Ottawa., Canada, in late May.

There are a whole slew of companies developing wearable robotics, or as they are more popularly known, exoskeletons. Mawashi says that Exoskeletons are a disruptive technology because they are impacting multiple industries simultaneously. Some of the systems have been created specifically for defense use. Of these, the vast majority are powered, which is crucial to the ability to lift heavy weights, such as a Power Loader taking the place of a forklift. However, that reliance on power can also be a weakness, for some applications. For example, no one wants to run out of power, midway through a mission. What makes Canadian firm Mawashi’s solution different is that it is human powered. Designed to reduce skeletal muscular injuries, UPRISE™ is an acronym for Ultralight Passive Ruggedized Integrated Soldier Exoskeleton.

Starting load carriage studies in 2005, Mawashi’s engineers investigated how the human body bears weight, in particular they looked at the severely overweight (300-700 lbs), especially Sumo wrestlers, who remain active despite their girth. Interestingly, the name Mawashi comes from the loincloth worn by the Sumo.

What Alain Bujold, President and Chief Technology Officer of Mawashi, and his team found, is that the body can bear an amazing amount of its own weight because of how it is distributed. They surmised that a load is a load; a pound, a pound, whether it’s fat or Mission Equipment.

UPRISE™ mimics the human form, with a flexible spine and sliding belt which combine to offer a great deal of freedom of movement. The exoskeleton is padded and fit is fine tuned via Boa dial at several locations on the legs.

The Harness also integrates with body armor as well as other loads such as packs. Additionally, they’ve demonstrated that gear normally worn on the War Belt, such as holsters, can be attached to the exoskeleton. No matter what is attached to the system, the entire weight of the exoskeleton is borne by a plate which is inserted like an insole into the wearer’s footwear. In fact, UPRISE™ transfers 50-80% of the wearer’s load right to the ground. Mawashi intends it for use on three to seven day missions.

Development continues. So far, the work has concentrated on the major load bearing structures of back and lower extremities, Mawashi plans to increase coverage. While UPRISE™ won’t make you run faster, and won’t give you super human strength, it will make you less fatigued, and it will help protect your lower joints.

They recently produced this video entitled, “WE ARE MAWASHI: The Rise of The Exoskeleton” which showcases the technology.


WE ARE MAWASHI: The Rise of the Exoskeleton from Mawashi Science & Technology on Vimeo.

www.mawashi.net

OpenWERX – AirSpew: Modular Information Dissemination System

Tuesday, June 27th, 2017

OpenWERX (sponsored by SOFWerx) provides the general public with quarterly opportunities to collaborate on innovative approaches relevant to SOCOM and other federal government agencies.

Team Registration deadline: 30 June

Prizes:
First place: $10,000
Second place: $5,000
Third place: $3,000

To register, visit www.sofwerx.org/openwerx-airspew

Total Game Changer – USSOCOM & USMC Take First Steps Toward Adopting a .338NM Lightweight Medium Machine Gun

Monday, May 15th, 2017

In a move that will turn the term “Overmatch” on its ear, the United States Special Operations Command, in conjunction with the United States Marine Corps has issued a sources sought notice for 5,000 Lightweight Medium Machine Guns in .338 Norma Magnum. The Russian PKM is a primary concern for dismounted infantry and the LWMMG doubles the 1000m effective range of the PKM.

Specifically, they are seeking producers who can provide:
-complete machinegun system to include weapon, suppressed barrel, and tripod
-any tools needed to conduct basic maintenance

In short, the capability will provide a machine gun which is lighter than the current 7.62mm M240, yet offers nearly the reach of the .50 M2. However, unlike the M2, this new capability will offer pinpoint accuracy at those ranges. What’s more, with the introduction of polymer cased ammo, the weight of ammunition comes much closer to 7.62 than .50.

LWMMG specifics: The LWMMG should fire the belted .338NM round of ammunition with a polymer case. The LWMMG should weigh less than 24 pounds unloaded with a barrel length of 24in. The LWMMG should have a rate of fire of between 500-600 rounds per minute. Weapon shall be compatible with current rail mounted aiming systems with the ability to incorporate more advanced fire control technology. The system should include both a suppressed barrel and an unsuppressed barrel that can be rapidly changed. The LWMMG should include a tripod that is lightweight and provides the stability and accuracy required to engage targets at extreme ranges. The LWMMG should be able to mount in current machinegun mounts designed for the M240B/C. The weapon should have sufficient accuracy to engage area targets and vehicles at 2,000m.

At the recent NDIA Armaments Symposium, USASOC DCS G8, COL Samuel Ashley briefed this capability. The capability has been sufficiently demonstrated to move to procurement. However, COL Ashley related that this new capability will require new ootics amd target acquisition solutions.

To be sure, adopting a new cartridge is an expensive endeavor, but in this case, the new capability more than outweighs the cost. Additionally, SOCOM plans to introduce the caliber to its upcoming multi-caliber Advanced Sniper Rifle, along with a legacy 7.62 NATO and .300NM round.

One interesting point in the RFI is the mention of two types of barrels. One is a standard barrel and the other is suppressed. Notice they didn’t ask for a suppressor, but rather a suppressed barrel. As GD has demonstrated the weapon in use with a detachable suppressor in the past, this indicates they must have developed an integrally suppressed barrel. The amount of Interal Reasearch and Development Dollars GD has put into this weapon is impressive.

IMG_0535

This 2016 chart from a Jim Schatz briefing to industry depicts the weights of the M240, LWMMG and M2. In addition to weapon upgrades, Polycase technology is going to further lighten that load, or better yet, increase the amount of ammunition a machine gunner can carry.

We recently mentioned General Dynamics Ordnance and Tactical Systems’, Commercial Off The Shelf solution which this requirement is based on and is available right now, but I would not be surprised to see other vendors offer up solutions as well. I’ll keep my eyes peeled during this week’s SOFIC to see what turns up.

Some readers will get wrapped around the axel over the 5,000 number of systems in the RFI; but don’t. It’s a nice round number the government is using to measure industry’s capacity to produce the weapon. By no means is it a basis of issue plan based number.

In my opinion, adoption of this capability is the single greatest small arms capability enhancement to the US military in the last century. It offers the ability to deliver accurate sustained fire at ranges out to 2000m in a package which can be employed by one operator. MARSOC has been following the weapon’s development, but good on the Marine Corps writ large in seeing the value of this proposition. Hopefully, the US Army, a service very concerned about threat overmatch, will move this capability from a Future to Near-Term priority. However, based on recent directed requirement from the 4-Star level, I would not be surprised to see this happen as SOCOM’s program reaches maturity. This will not only enhance the Army’s capabilities but also help control ammunition costs.

For those interested in full details, visit www.fbo.gov.

AeroVironment, Developer of the Nano Hummingbird, Unveils Snipe, A New, Stealthy Nano Quadrotor UAS

Tuesday, May 9th, 2017

-Launched from the palm of a hand, Snipe™ is worn on operators’ clothing so it can spring into action immediately – first 20 systems delivered in April
-Difficult to detect, Snipe provides close-range intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance (ISR)
-Simple to use and requires no assembly; operates in challenging and rugged environmental conditions
-Builds on breakthrough robotic Nano Hummingbird developed by AeroVironment for DARPA


DALLAS, at AUVSI XPONENTIAL, May 9, 2017 – AeroVironment, Inc. (NASDAQ: AVAV), a global leader in unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for both military and commercial applications, today officially unveiled the new Snipe Nano Quad, a miniature (“Class 0”) and field-rugged unmanned aircraft system designed to support close-range intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance missions. The first U.S. government customer delivery of 20 Snipe systems took place in April.

“Snipe’s tiny size belies its impressive capabilities,” said Kirk Flittie, AeroVironment vice president and general manager of its Unmanned Aircraft Systems business segment. “It is quick, quiet, fast, durable and packed with advanced features critical to helping our customers succeed in close-range missions.”

“Snipe enables operators to spring into action quickly,” Flittie said. “No assembly is required for the five-ounce (140-gram) nano-UAS, which is designed to be worn by its operator so it can be deployed in less than a minute.”

Equipped with electro-optical/infrared (EO/IR), low-light-capable and long-wave infrared (LWIR) sensors in an integrated tilt mechanism, Snipe can relay high-resolution images and record real-time video both day and night. In addition, Snipe’s integrated UHF radio provides for excellent non-line-of-sight operation. The software-defined radio (SDR) allows Snipe to be sold commercially.

With its quiet electric motors, flight speeds exceeding 20 mph and more than one-kilometer range, Snipe is difficult to detect in operating environments with even minimal ambient noise. Its rechargeable batteries power approximately 15 minutes of flight time. Despite its small size, the durable nano-UAS is capable of operating under challenging environmental conditions – including winds of 15+ mph with gusts up to 20 mph

“While Snipe’s stealthiness makes it ideally suited for military applications, it’s an invaluable asset for anyone needing a ‘Class 0’ UAS to support their missions,” Flittie said.

Snipe is controlled using an intuitive app on a standard, ruggedized (MIL-STD 810) touch screen controller with intuitive user interface and automated operation for ease of use. Other critical functions include Snipe’s ability to return to its operator automatically if it loses its radio link.

Snipe benefits from advances in nano unmanned technology achieved by the company in its development of the internationally recognized Nano Hummingbird. “The Nano Hummingbird, the world’s first unmanned aircraft capable of propulsion and control using two flapping wings, is an example of how our breakthrough innovation has spawned a valuable new capability in Snipe that now will help our customers proceed with certainty,” added Flittie.

AeroVironment’s Snipe Nano Quadrotor will be available to order Fall 2017. Operator training requires four hours only.

www.avinc.com

USSOCOM Seeks Advanced Technologies

Tuesday, April 25th, 2017

USSOCOM Science and Technology Directorate’s (SOF AT&L-ST) has issued addendum J of their Broad Agency Announcement for advanced technologies. The directorate’s vision is to Discover, Enable, and Transition technologies to provide an asymmetric advantage for Special Operations Forces (SOF). SOF AT&L-ST has identified specific technology Areas of Interest to accelerate the delivery of innovative capabilities to the SOF warfighter.

Fires/Scalable Effects Weapons (SEW):
USSOCOM seeks to study, design, develop, and demonstrate advanced technologies associated with the application of fire from non-lethal through lethal. These technologies include, but are not limited to, weapons, munitions, and fire control, with the major development goals being lighter weight, lower cost of ownership throughout the entire lifecycle of the product, and increased effectiveness. Highly desired are:

Improved Effectiveness of Fragmentation Weapons. Alternatives to existing fragmentation weapons, or weapons where the casing is shattered upon detonation, and identifying munitions with greater effectiveness while applying the FBI standard for bullets (10-12 in penetration of tissue simulant) in the design of fragmentation munitions. The technology and approaches should assess what industries such as aerospace, automobile manufacturing and other non-ordnance suppliers have available or in development that applies to the needs. Specifically desired are:

Analysis of alternatives on potential of fragmentation weapons.

Enhanced 40mm x 46xx fragmentation grenade. USSOCOM is interested in an enhanced 40mm x 46mm cartridge propellant system that optimizes the acceleration curve enabling heavier payloads at current ranges or current payloads a longer range while remaining within current pressure and recoil limits. Peak chamber pressure is approximately 2320-3000 psi depending on barrel material and thickness. Recoil safety limit is 45 ft-lbs to 50 ft-lbs. USSOCOM is interested in increasing the lethal area of a 40mm x 46mm fragmentation projectile with enhanced energetics and optimize controlled fragmentation. USSOCOM defines lethal area as having a minimum of 2 fragments per square meter and 90% of those fragments penetrating 12 inches of 10% tissue simulant.

Payload Development. Technologies that can be employed as a payload to stop/disable maritime vessels and that can be delivered from an unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV). The payload can deliver a non-reversible effect, however, the effect should not betray hostile intent. Technologies/payloads that can be transported in a UUV compartment and can be exposed to a harsh, marine environment. Technologies/payloads should stop a vessel less than 50 meters long.

Human Performance
USSOCOM seeks to conduct research, design, development and demonstration of capabilities that enhance physiological, physical, psychological, and intellectual performance, and improve resistance to disease, stress, or injury caused by the demands of sustained operations in extreme environments. Highly desired are:

Performance Enhancements. Innovative solutions that will optimize human performance, reduce recovery time, and increase peak performance sustainability, including increased endurance, strength, energy, agility, enhanced senses, provide restorative effects of sleep, and enhance tolerance to environmental extremes. The technologies can be demonstrated through studies that provide proof of concepts or through solutions demonstrated in humans that quantify operational performance improvements. Technologies should not consist of new software applications, wearables, and additional studies on existing nutraceuticals that have been previously researched in depth. SOF AT&L-ST is specifically interested in:

Genomics, epigenetics, proteomics, and synthetic biology

Nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals

Enhancing metabolic efficiency

Methods of improving oxygen delivery to muscles

Reducing the potential for musculoskeletal injury

Increasing tolerance to pain

Cognitive Enhancement

Sleep Restoration

Submissions should consider methods of demonstrating safety and efficacy, and a regulatory approval strategy if required. Proposed solutions do not have to be FDA cleared as a prerequisite, but nutraceuticals and/or pharmaceuticals must be US-sourced. Submitters should have access or partners with access to lab facilities.

Protection
USSOCOM seeks to conduct research, development and demonstration of advanced technologies associated with protecting the future dismounted SOF Operator. These technologies include, but are not limited to, ballistic body armor, helmets, and eye protection, with the major development goals being lighter weight and increased protection. SOF AT&L-ST is specifically interested in chemistry and microstructure improvements for advanced armor materials, including the following:

Mechanical property enhancements in existing armor ceramics through microstructure modifications

Development of new ceramic armor materials

Continued optimization of fiber-based armor materials, to include aramids, ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene, and their associated resin systems

Investigations into additive manufacturing of armor materials (metals, polymers, and ceramics)

Thin, lightweight and low-cost transparent armor (polymer, glass and ceramic based solutions)

While the main focus of the research should be development of advanced armor materials, other considerations include projectiles of interest (7.62 x 39 mm MSC at 2400-2450 ft/s, 7.62 x 39 mm API BZ at 2400-2450 ft/s, 7.62 x 54R mm API B32 at 2850-2900 ft/s, and 7.62 x 51 mm AP M993 at 3050-3100 ft/s), a final system thickness of less than 1.0 inch, backface signature performance of less than 44.0 millimeters at the velocities listed above, and an ultimate goal of areal density reduction (with similar or improved ballistic performance).

Optical Electronics
USSOCOM seeks to conduct research, design, develop, and demonstrate advanced technologies associated with target engagement, intelligence, surveillance & reconnaissance, and neutralization of opposing force capabilities. These technologies include, but are not limited to, optics, lasers, sensors, and radar, with the major development goals being transition to the field within 5 years, backwards compatible with existing infrastructure, and do not require a significant cost investment to produce and sustain. SOF AT&L-ST is specifically interested in:

Observer to Point of Interest: Ground-to-Ground/Air-to-Ground

Man Portable Equipment and Turrets / Pods to Tower-Test

Characterization Abilities: Ability to identify and detect persons or objects of interest, identification of and thru material layers

Technologies that can be employed to effect long range enemy identification, to include laser vibrometry. Specific distances have yet to be determined, but should work outside the signature ranges of Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) platforms to ensure surreptitious collection

Interested parties must submit whitepapers for this BAA Addendum which closes on June 5, 2017, at 11:59 p.m. EDT. USSOCOM may select some candidates which will then be funded up to $3m and given up to three years of development.

For full details, visit www.fbo.gov.