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Archive for the ‘DIY’ Category

Atlas 46 – Journeyman Apron With Cargo Pockets

Monday, September 28th, 2015


The Journeyman Apron with Cargo Pockets – A46-JMA-CP is an update on Atlas 46’s Journeyman Apron, offering equivalent durability and protection, but with flapped cargo pockets across the bottom.

Features and Benefits

– Rugged 1000D Cordura construction

– Padded shoulder harness for comfort

– Adjustable back and waist straps for proper wear

– Zippered pocket for cell phone or note pad

– Triple front cargo pockets with covered flaps, with slit pockets behind

– Dual hammer loop with AIM webbing on each hip for preferential carry

– Slotted webbing for attachment of add on AIM System pouches and platforms

– Pockets on inside of apron for gloves, rags, etc.

– Hand crafted in the USA

– Available in Black, Coyote, and MultiCam.

Atlas 46 – AIMS 3″ Magnetic Panel

Saturday, August 29th, 2015

Many of us are busy with DIY projects this Saturday so we thoight it wouod be a great time to tell you about the AIMS 3″ Magnetic Panel from Atlas 46.


This 3″w x .5″d x 4.5″h panel uses Atlas 46’s AIM attachment system which sandwiches the pouch around the belt (fits up to 2” belt) and allows quick attach without removing the belt. It incorprates six magnets to hold smaller items in place and would be handy for chores. Hand crafted in the USA


Available in Black or Coyote.  Also offered in 2″ width.

Cool Wakizashi Inspired Magazine Mod by ORCA Industries

Tuesday, February 10th, 2015


Orca Industries was inspired by the “little” sword used by Japanese Samurai when they modified these HK VP9 mag extensions. The wakizashi effect was created by combining Tsuka Ito wrap and Dragon Menuki from Steel Flame.

The SureFire How-To Channel on YouTube

Wednesday, February 4th, 2015

Have you checked out the SureFire How-To channel on YouTube? There are several videos already loaded including this one featuring Barry Dueck as he explains how to properly mount a SureFire suppressor to your rifle.

DIY Thermal Targets

Tuesday, January 13th, 2015

PEO-Soldier turned us on to this article in PS – The Preventive Maintenance Monthly on how to make your own thermal targets.



Arc’teryx Demonstrates How to Care for Your Gore-Tex Gear

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

Arc’teryx produced this excellent video demonstrating how to care for your Gore-Tex garments. It’s great advice for all of your waterproof breathable outer garments, regardless of material.

The Annual “Revitalizing Your DWR” Post

Thursday, October 16th, 2014

It’s getting cold early this year. We originally published this article in February of 2010 but seeing as the weather is getting cold and times are tough we republish it each year. We know you pay a lot for your clothing and equipment and it is just as important to maintain it, as it is your firearm.

It looks like it’s going to be a LONG winter. During a recent shooting class I attended it started raining day one and by the middle of the second day it looked like a blizzard. Most of my fellow shooters were wearing waterproof breathable outerwear and several began to feel clammy and then damp the longer each day progressed. A couple of guys were wearing issue Gen I ECWCS parkas. Probably not the best garment available as Gore long ago decided that the basic design could not meet their “Guaranteed to Keep You Dry” standards. Of course these jackets were old. More than anything, they needed some maintenance.

The key to any modern outerwear is its Durable Water Repellent (DWR). There are quite a few treatments available and different manufacturers have their favorites but they are usually are based on flouropolymers. These are PTFE molecules that are applied to the surface and cured at high heat to make them adhere better and increase performance and have a fluorine atom at one end which is highly hydrophobic. Heat causes them to align themselves with their flourines exposed. Water tries to move away from the flourines resulting in beading. This allows the water to roll off without wetting the fabric. Interestingly, Quarpel (Quartermaster Repellent) was one of the first DWRs and used to treat field jackets and other military clothing items.

Since most of us can’t run out and purchase a new jacket every time this happens I thought it would be a good idea to share a few tips with you that will not only revitalize your garment’s DWR treatment but also extend the life of your clothing.

DWR treatments work best when they are clean. I realize this seems counter to what you think is right since a DWR generally lasts about 25 washings and tactical garments get quite a beating in the field, but you need to wash your clothing. The first thing is to avoid using liquid detergents as well as fabric softeners. Additionally, avoid optical brighteners as they are not good for DWR or IR treatments. There are wash in treatments you can purchase as well as spray on options to help renew your clothing’s DWR. However, wash in treatments may affect the breathability of your membrane. One of the best spray solutions available is Revivex from McNett and it is what I have used in the past. It also serves as a stain repellent. Revivex can also be applied to garments that never had DWR in the first place so if you have hunting or field clothing that you find yourself wearing in inclement weather regularly you may want to give it a once over. If you use a spray treatment be sure to evenly coat your garment while it is still damp after washing and to pay special attention to any seams.

There are two additional ways you can put some life back into your DWR. One is to put the garment in a conventional dryer on warm and the other is to iron it on low heat. If water fails to bead up on the surface of your garment you will need to retreat.

No matter which method you choose, proper maintenance of your foul weather clothing’s DWR will help keep you warm and dry and extend the life of your equipment.