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Archive for the ‘EOD’ Category

Forces Focus – Raven’s Challenge 2017

Tuesday, September 5th, 2017

The 2017 Ravens Challenge EOD exercises were funded by the Army and led by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, with support from the FBI, the Defense Department, the Transportation Security Administration and state and local public safety agencies throughout the country.

This year’s exercises took place at Camp Pendleton in August, Pinal Airpark in Marana, Arizona, in March; Muscatatuck Urban Training Center, North Vernon, Indiana, in April; Camp Dawson, Kingwood, West Virginia, in May; and Camp Shelby, Mississippi, in June.

A DoD News article by Shannon Collins describes the event:

Throughout the week, the combined teams went through training scenarios, or lanes. One such scenario was a hostage situation, where a hostage in a stairwell had a bomb strapped to his body while other hostages were upstairs and there was a body booby-trapped on the ground floor. Teams also dealt with locating hidden devices, an aircraft with a device in the cabin or baggage area, improvised mortars located on rooftops and in vehicles, a cabin with booby traps and a suspicious package in a hospital.

Training was under realistic conditions, and included a no-light and low-light environment, where technicians had to use night-vision goggles while entering a village and disarming devices through the goggles or with the naked eye.

“The no-light, low-light was my favorite. because it’s the most challenging thing an EOD tech can do — walk through something you can barely see,” said Army Spc. Seth Hamilton, an EOD technician from Fort Bliss, Texas. “You’re hot, you’re tired, they’ve booby-trapped an entire warehouse; so you’re going through in the middle of the dark, just trying to get through without dying. It had the best training value.”

Lanes were also focused on responding to the developing tactics of terrorists, such as the use of booby-trapped unmanned aerial systems.

“The UAS seems to be the emerging threat, … because of the widespread availability of unmanned systems. It’s exciting for us to say, ‘Hey, this is a new emerging threat.’ We’re going to be the people figuring out how to address it and come up with the [tactics, techniques and procedures] to become more proactive,” said Marine Corps Gunnery Sgt. Brian Murphy, an EOD technician here.

Intelligence analyst B. Joshua Bauer discusses terrorists’ use of commercially available unmanned aircraft with U.S. and Belgian explosive ordnance disposal teams during the Raven’s Challenge exercise at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 1, 2017. DoD photo by EJ Hersom
Intelligence analyst B. Joshua Bauer discusses terrorists’ use of commercially available unmanned aircraft with U.S. and Belgian explosive ordnance disposal teams during the Raven’s Challenge exercise at Camp Pendleton, Calif., Aug. 1, 2017. DoD photo by EJ Hersom
“The new [unmanned aerial vehicle] threat, we’re the first people in our company to get that knowledge and run that lane, and we can’t do that at our home station,” said Army Staff Sgt. Sean Mattes, an EOD bomb technician from Fort Bliss. “So now we can go back and help educate those guys and tell them what we’ve learned but until they come to something like this, they’ll never get that training. You really broaden your skills with the site layout and coordination. You’ve got to get every tool out and use it, and that’s what I like doing.”

“The teams who went up against the UAVs for the first time had no procedures to use,” said Col. David Schmitt, chief of the Army’s adaptive counter-IED/EOD solutions division. “There was no logic tree to follow to get to the right solution, so they were working that out inside their heads, but if we do it right, then the issues will be captured in the after-action report, the review will go back into the process, so next year, they will have a logic train for this scenario.”

Schmitt said Raven’s Challenge is one of the largest DoD EOD counter-IED interoperability training exercises in the world. “Continuing to do this kind of training provides incredible benefits for the individual participants, but also for the services and the bigger institutions that sends the participants, because it feeds into the after-action reviews,” he said. “These feed into the institutional processes that drive what equipment we buy, what training we do in our institutions. It drives a lot of change in the Army, and, I would imagine, elsewhere.”

Morgan Advanced Materials Enhances Bomb Suit Capability with Specialist Silverback CBRN Visor

Friday, July 21st, 2017

A specialist Explosive Ordnance Disposal (EOD) helmet visor has been launched by Morgan Advanced Materials, which integrates with its cutting edge Silverback® 4020 Elite bomb suit. This has been made available in response to increased demand for chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) protective garments.

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Designed as an additional option for Morgan’s acclaimed Silverback® 4020 Elite bomb disposal suit, the Silverback CBRN visor allows for the seamless integration of in-service CBRN masks. Featuring a wider surface area to accommodate the wearing of a CBRN facemask and respiration equipment, the visor delivers a range of benefits including powerful demisting technology and a wide field of vision for optimal situational awareness, helping to maximise the safety of the wearer. The latest innovation is the outcome of more than a year of research and development, and has undergone extensive blast testing to ensure full protection for the wearer.

The unique design of the Silverback CBRN visor allows for seamless integration with leading in-service CBRN facemasks and protective undergarments. Designed to ensure full compatibility as a complete CBRN garment system, the Silverback 4020 Elite features Modular Lightweight Load-carrying Equipment (MOLLE) attachments on the rear of suit jacket which allow for air purification and respiratory systems and other critical accessories to be attached.

Chris Davies, Technical Director at the Composites and Defence Systems business of Morgan Advanced Materials, explained: “The launch of our Silverback CBRN visor represents a significant technological breakthrough and step change in the application of our bomb suits. We are proud to have developed an EOD suit solution, which is compatible with most in-service CBRN garments to protect EOD teams from an array of threats.”

The Silverback CBRN visor is available to buy with the Silverback 4020 Elite bomb suit, or as a standalone purchase for existing Silverback 4020 Elite customers who wish to upgrade to a CBRN protective solution.

For further information, please visit www.morgandefencesystems.com/CBRNVisor

Darley Defense Days – Sericore

Thursday, June 8th, 2017

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We showed you Sericore’s Demolition System Remote and Timed device during a Darley event a few years ago.

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Using the same technology, they’ve introduced the new Sericore Remote Firing Initiator. Designed specifically for a federal law enforcement agency, the system has a 2.5 mile LOS range in a rural high RF environment and .5 mile LOS Range in an urban high RF environment and features AES encrypted comms. Each transmitter is powered by CR-123A batteries and will controls up to 8 receivers. It’s 10 juole discharge fires 80 M6 series detonators and the MD82 tip fires NONEL and electric detonators. ARM hold times are 10, 30 or 60 min and the fire delay is configurable for 0, 1, 2, or 5 secs.

www.sericore.com

Warrior West – Tactical Electronics Launches CORE Product Line

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Tactical Electronics has been in business since 1999 and is well known for their under the door camera commonly used by SWAT teams. Over time they have refined their technology and introduced new products, leading to the introduction of the new modular, CORE system which consists of two grip options and four camera heads. The user mixes and matches the components for the intended application.


The Grip holds the electronics and the heads are used for different applications. Grips are the CORE Grip and the CORE Pole Grip. Both accept any of the heads (the Pole Grip doesn’t accept the articulating head). Integrated into the CORE Grip is an eye piece for up close work. Additionally, there is a wrist mounted monitor, for wireless remote viewing, which relies on digital encrypted radio for the link.

Heads offered are CORE Flex Camera, CORE Under Door Camera, CORE Pole Camera and Articulating Scope.


In addition to color or B/W images, Tactical Electronics also offers a thermal image. However, they’ve now introduced an overlay mode, similar to I2/Thermal fusion, which provides outlines of objects unto the thermal image. In the graphic above, you can see what the thermal image looks like alone, and then below, how it looks in overlay mode.  The enhancement is striking.  

Available now from www.tacticalelectronics.com.

Warrior West – Rocksmith Precision

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

Rocksmith Precision is making quite a name for themselves in building specialized tools for the EOD community. However, at Warrior West I saw their Rocksmith 30:1 cutter and thought of several other uses for this amazing hand powered cutting tool such as breaching and technical survelliance applications. In a show filled with awesome kit, this is the coolest product I saw at the show.

That 30:1 in the name means exactly what it implies, offering a 30:1 mechanical advantage thanks to the design which allows the user to configure the handle in one of two ways (seen below). I used it to snip a chainlink like it was butter and I also used it to open up 14 gage material used in CONEXs. All of that with my hand. Plus, it will go right through welds, unlike power tools. Additionally, you can begin your cut with a simple 1/4″ entry hole. Currently, they offer two styles of swappable blades. One is for chainlink and the other is for sheetmetal.


If all of that wasn’t enough, it is 7″ long and weighs less than half a pound. That’s the kind of a tool you don’t want to leave behind.

www.rocksmithcloser.com

Warrior West – LBT-2670 EOD Pack

Wednesday, April 19th, 2017

This particular pack/setup was developed for state, local, and federal EOD training.

Modular both internally and externally allowing for a number of missions specific load-outs.

Compatible with the Armatus II carrier MAP system front and back panels.

www.lbtinc.com

Protonex Launches Updated EOD Kit

Tuesday, April 4th, 2017

The Universal Power Kit, based on Protonex’ industry-leading SPM-622 Squad Power Manager, dramatically reduces the weight and clutter of batteries, chargers and power adapters currently used by military EOD teams.

The original SPM-612 EOD kit, pioneered by Protonex in partnership with the Office of Naval Research (ONR), Naval Sea Systems Command (NavSea) and Navy EOD Training & Evaluation Team Two, was deployed to all Navy EOD teams in 2014. The teams subsequently reported a reduction in charger and adapter weight from 45-lbs. to 9-lbs., with a correspondingly large decrease in space taken up in the EOD team vehicle.

The Navy EOD teams were also the first to request that Protonex package each intelligent power manager kit in a rugged “roll kit”, keeping the equipment organized and ready for use while decreasing volume and weight. More than 90% of all power management kits shipped to every branch of the U.S. military and many allied militaries are now requested in nylon roll kits.

The updated EOD Universal Power Kit includes the SPM-622 Squad Power Manager, with additional power-handling and intelligence, as well as full waterproofing (the SPM-622 can be used while submerged up to 1-meter). Additional equipment support also now includes the latest Minehound® and other metal detectors, as well as DeWalt® and Snap-On® tool batteries and other EOD-specific equipment.

“The new enhanced EOD universal power kit builds on the capability established with the original SPM-612 kit and gives today’s EOD teams the most advanced universal power solution available,” said Michael Skinkle, Protonex EOD Account Manager. “When used in conjunction with our Adaptive Battery Charger, EOD teams have a total power management solution that is more efficient and rugged than other options.”

The SPM-622 EOD kit (Protonex part number 010-458) is available directly from Protonex or through GSA Advantage, the NSN Class IX Schedule from ADS, Darley Defense and Federal Resources.

For further information about the SPM-622 Squad Power Manager, and the full range of Protonex power management solutions, visit www.PTXnomad.com.

Zero Point – Pull-Line Master

Tuesday, February 28th, 2017

The Pull-Line Master was built for dismounted EOD operational requirements for quickly and effectively conducting remote pull procedures on suspicious items or ordnance. The kit includes 200 feet of Dyneema pull-line and a full complement of clamping, rigging, and cutting tools designed for quick attachment of the pull-line, decreasing time-on-target and limiting exposure to dangerous overpressure and fragmentation hazards. It also includes an additional 100 feet of pull-line and a smaller pouch for a reduced loadout as well as a hazard marking system suitable for day or nighttime use. The kit is PALS compatible.

Components:
(1) 200′ 7/32″ dyneema pull line
(1) 100′ 7/32″ dyneema pull line
(1) Titanium Grapple (TiGR)
(1) Hard storage case
(1) Large carry pouch
(1) Small carry pouch

The TiGR is Zero Point’s Titanium 3 Tine Grapple Hook. Each TiGR is tested to 1000 lbs pull before fielding.

Weighing in at 1.5 lbs, the kit is available in the following colors:
Coyote Brown
MultiCam
Ranger
Cop Black
ARID

www.zeropointusa.com/government-systems/access/pull-line-master