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Archive for the ‘Guest Post’ Category

US Army Small Arms Championship Winners Announced

Tuesday, March 19th, 2019

FORT BENNING, Ga. – The 2019 U.S. Army Small Arms Championships, which is hosted by the U.S. Army Marksmanship Unit, concluded it’s seven-day competition at Fort Benning, Georgia on March 16 with an awards ceremony.

The annual competition, which is commonly called the All Army, is the Army’s premier marksmanship competition that tests Soldiers ability on both their primary and secondary weapons through 11 different course of fire. This year, more than 260 Soldiers from across the United States and all four components of the Army (active duty, National Guard, Reserve and ROTC) came seeking the top titles as they battled it out in both tactical and civilian-style rifle and pistol matches, as well as a multigun match.

This year’s winners are:
• The 2019 All Army Champion: U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Horner with the Army Reserve Careers Division. (Suffolk, VA native)

• The 2019 All Army Champion Team: The U.S. Army Reserve team from Army Reserve Careers Division. Team members are: Sgt. Joseph Hall, Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Horner, Staff Sgt. Rafael Fuentes, Sgt. 1st Class Charles Parker, and coach: Sgt. Maj. James Mauer.

• The 2019 All Army Lt. Gen. Benjamin C. Freakley Trophy awardee: Texas A&M Cadet Brannon Sickels. This marksmanship excellence award is presented to the top cadet having the highest combined score from all rifle and pistol excellence in competition matches. During the All Army Championships, Sickels earned his Distinguished Pistol Shot Marksmanship Badge. Since he already earned his Distinguished Rifleman Badge, he is now double distinguished.

• The 2019 All Army Col. Ralph Puckett Awardee: Texas Army National Guard Sgt. Jaymes Sendo. This for excellence in marksmanship award is presented to the combined top novice shooter from all the rifle and pistol Excellence in Competition matches.

• The 2019 All Army Multigun Champion: U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Horner with the Army Reserve Careers Division.

• The 2019 All Army Pistol Champion: U.S. Army Reserve Sgt. Christopher Liming.

• The 2019 All Army Rifle Champion: National Guard Maj. Samuel Freeman with the National Guard Marksmanship Training Center.

• The 2019 All Army Open Division Champion: North Dakota Air National Guard Senior Airman Gavin Rook.

• The 2019 All Army Top Cadet: Texas A&M Cadet Brannon Sickels.

• The 2019 All Army Novice Division Champion: U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Tyler Virgin with 1st Corps.

• The 2019 All Army High Drill Sergeant: U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Daniel Varela from the 198th Infantry Training Brigade.

• The 2019 All Army Pistol Champion Team: Texas Army National Guard. Team members: Staff Sgt. Justus Densmore, Sgt. Tyler Greene, Capt. Robert Lee, Sgt. Jaymes Sendo, and coach: Staff Sgt. Michael Richey.

• The 2019 All Army Rifle Champion Team: California Army National Guard. Team members are Master Sgt. Philip Brock, Sgt. 1st Class Jonathan Garcia, Staff Sgt. Wayne Gray, and Sgt. Obed Gutierrez.

• The 2019 All Army Multigun Champion Team: U.S Army 1st Corps Team. Team members are: Sgt. 1st Class Tyler Virgin, Sgt. Ashton Foster, Staff Sgt. Nicholas Wirts, Staff Sgt. Logan Frost, and coach: Staff Sgt. Jeffery Lewis.

Story by MAJ Michelle Lunato, US Army Marksmanship Unit

Max Talk Monday: Squad Hasty Attack: Texas Class 2019

Monday, March 18th, 2019

This is the fourteenth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

Max Talk: The Squad Hasty Attack is video footage of the hasty attack drill at the Texas Class 2019. This was a squad level (2 x fire team) live fire training exercise against a simulated isolated enemy position. The point fire team comes under effective enemy fire and simulates fighting off the ‘X’ (in this case forward). The point team then becomes support by fire as the other team moves right flanking to assault. This drill formed part of the ‘Attack Day’ which included hasty attack and raid simulated live fire scenarios.

MVT Tactical Manual

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. 

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical

SCUBAPRO SUNDAY – Mask Care Pre and Post Dive

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

I wanted to have link to the Movie, The Fighting Sullivan’s in honor of ST Patrick’s day and I couldn’t find it. So, then I looked for The Fighting 69th, again can’t find that one also. The Fighting Sullivan’s is my favorite movies of all times. If you ever want to teach someone about brotherhood and loyalty. That is the movies to watch. Well and The Boonedock Saints.          

                 “Everyone is Irish on St Paddies Day”

                                      Happy St Patrick’s day.  

Dive masks are one of the most basic, and most important pieces of equipment you have for your dive. If your mask falls it makes for a very long and painful dive. To ensure your mask stays in good condition, you must take care of it like the important piece of equipment it is. If you can’t see beneath the surface, what’s the point?

Just as you would always care for your regulator, so should you always remember your mask. This maintenance needs to be a regular routine for your dive trips. Follow the tips below to keep an easy system flowing for your scuba mask care regime.

Pre-Dive

When a SCUBA mask is made it leaves a lot of film and residue on it. If not cleaned off properly you will never get your mask to stop fogging. You can search the Internet for lots of different ways to clean your mask. I am going to walk thru one of the easiest and safest way to do it. With some of the other way, if not done right you can break your mask glass or damage your frame.

Check your mask for any damage that’s occurred. Look for small cracks in the rubber of the strap or on the skirt. Test the elasticity of the strap, replacing as needed, don’t wait until you are on the dive boat to try test this. Make sure you check the clips as well.

Inspect the skirt on your mask for wear and tears. Also look at the frame of the mask where the glass is seated for imperfections. 

Post-Dive

Always rinse your mask with freshwater. Let it dry properly out of direct sunlight. You can clean it with toothpaste or a mask cleaner. Let your mask dry out completely to prevent mold and mildew growth.

Storage and Proactive Care

Mask care includes smart storage. Keep it in a hard-covered case for the best protection from moisture, dust, and impact. If it came with a hard case, make sure you store the mask in that. Plastic parts can stay oddly shaped if crushed or folded down when incorrectly stored for long periods of time. Also make sure it has good airflow to make sure it doesn’t get moldy.

Basic gear maintenance will allow you to keep your gear for a long time and also help it not fail you when it is needed most.

 

 

US, Philippine Armies Exchange Best Techniques for Training Working Dogs

Sunday, March 17th, 2019

CAMP AQUINO, Philippines — The U.S Army and Soldiers from the Philippine Army’s K9 Battalion trained together on March 6, 2019 during exercise Salaknib to learn each other’s military working dog training techniques. Training together like this allows U.S. forces and host countries to build lasting partnerships and prepare to work together on real missions.

“The Subject Matter Experts allow us to exchange ideas and some best practices as to how the programs are managed,” said U.S. Army Sgt. 1st Class Ivan Alvira, the plans section Non-Commissioned Officer In Charge with the 8th Military Police Brigade. “We can compare notes on how they manage their programs and how we manage ours and then take back those suggestions and maybe make adjustments in the way that we do things.”

Each team has been open to new ideas and training tools in learning ways to make their programs better. Even with language barriers and time constraints, everyone involved has benefited by working together.

U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Michael Holmes, the plans NCO with the 520th Military Working Dog Detachment explained how good it has been working with the Philippine military. “I have absorbed their information as well and I’m going to be able to take that back to my counterparts back in the states.”

The Philippine army enjoyed working alongside the U.S. Army and was happy with the lessons they received.

“We are lucky to have Sgt. 1st Class Alvira and Staff Sgt. Holmes conducting lectures pertaining to canine operations,” said Philippine Army Maj. Christopher C. Manimtim with the K9 Battalion. “And also to share some of the best practices not only for the U.S. army but for the Philippine soldiers.”

Sharing ideas and training tools does not just benefit the canine programs, but also the military as a whole. It creates a familiarity with another’s branch of service which helps in times of need. Working together to share tips on how to better military programs, helps everyone by creating and strengthening bonds.

“Anytime that you’re interacting with a partner, your building on readiness; you’re building on interoperability,” Alvira added. “It’s allowing us to build trust and confidence in the abilities of both nations. So anytime that you can interact with another nation in an exercise such as Salakinib or Balikatan, it allows us to get better as a joint force.”

Both sides become strengthened as a team in many ways. Everyone has shared a lot of new concepts and methods; and hope to expand their training and work together for many years.

By SPC Elizabeth Johnson

SPARTANAT: News from Lindnerhof Taktik – IWA 2019  

Friday, March 15th, 2019

Since the last IWA, Lindnerhof experienced twelve truly exciting months: new products were developed and proven products were optimized further. In perfect time for the IWA 2019, Lindnerhof presents the novelties in the product portfolio of the provider of tactical gear.

New flagship: the plate carrier 25 with quick-release system

The new plate carrier is the further development of the proven plate carrier of the VI generation and combines the models L1 Evo and H1 Evo. It is made of the reliable outer fabric Cordura 500. The most important novelty here is the downsizing of the quick release system in the shoulder straps from 40mm to 25mm. This provides more wearing comfort in the everyday use. In addition, the width of the sewn strap was reduced to 20mm. In this way it is possible to achieve a weight reduction of approximately 20%.

With the new model Lindnerhof responds to a customer’s request: the possibility to convert the plate carrier H1 Evo to a heavy protective vest and making it available also for classical plate carriers made of Cordura. Hanging the soft ballistics in the front and back is just as possible as adding shields for the neck and the upper arms.

As first of its kind, the new plate carrier comprises a reversible zip on its back. In this manner it is possible to attach various modular back panels, thus enabling the fast exchange of the panel, depending on the type of activity.

Quickly exchangeable: modular back panel

In conjunction with the new plate carrier, practiced users can attach the back panel within only five seconds.

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Thanks to the individual configuration, it is possible to quickly and appropriately react to the different tasks. The upper opening allows the take-up of a breaching tool. The fold-out extension allows the take-up of a bolt cutter.

Available again: Double magazine pouch G36, attachable with Velcro

Because of the continuous high customer demand last year, the double magazine pouch attachable with Velcro is available again. The pouch has the advantage that it is possible to transport additional magazines without having to use up the MOLLE surfaces at the plate carriers or the vest. This ensures enough space for bags and other equipment.

The pouch can be attached in the conventional way in the front or rear lower area of the plate carrier. At the sides, two G36 magazines can be introduced. A rubber with puller serves as safety mechanism. The laterally provided rubber woven band serves for compression in case of non-use.

More space thanks to Velcro: Diagonal multi-purpose pouch, attachable with Velcro
The advantages of the double magazine pouch with Velcro back were also used in another novelty. The diagonal multi-purpose pouch attachable with Velcro can particularly be attached at the front in the lower area of the plate carrier, which enables simple access to the pouch – even without looking.

By means of a zipper extending across the entire width, the pouch is opened and offers enough space for various parts of equipment and operating resources. At the contact surface of the inside, a large fleecy surface is provided, which facilitates both the affixing of equipment by means of Velcro panels as well as the organization of equipment and the targeted access. In addition, the outside is compatible with Velcro patches that can be affixed for identification tags. A discharge eyelet prevents that fluids collect in the bag.

Mature concept: Weapon fixation straps with hooks

The new fixation strap for long firearms went through a long development process and an extensive testing phase. As a small supporting piece of equipment in the overall structure of tactical gear, however, it comprises very innovative novelties.

Contrary to its predecessor, the new version can be operated with only one hand. A buckle closure is provided at the end for a strong connection.

At the other end a small ball is provided, which Lindnerhof also refers to as “pineapple” and which – thanks to its characteristic form and grip – can be operated with gloves as well. In conjunction with a hook that is usually positioned at the front part of the plate carrier the strap can be opened and closed fast, one-handedly and without looking, which helps fixing or loosening the weapon easily. The ball was developed in such a manner that the bond is not loosened even in the event of extreme movements, such as jumping or crawling.

LINDNERHOF-TAKTIK GmbHwww.lindnerhof-taktik.de

www.spartanat.com

New Vehicle-mounted Electronic Tech Enables Marines to Combat Threats

Thursday, March 14th, 2019

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

Marine Corps Systems Command plans to implement a new form of technology that allows the Marine Air-Ground Task Force to identify enemy activity.

The technology employs a vehicle-borne tool that enables Marines to discern what happens inside the electromagnetic spectrum. It connects several independent electronic capabilities into a single unit and allows Marines to manage threats and reactions from a central location.

“Marines are going to be able to make decisions on what they are seeing,” said Lt. Col. Thomas Dono, a team lead in MCSC’s Command Elements Systems.

Marines currently use systems to counter IEDs that block signals used by adversaries to remotely detonate explosive devices. The new technology is a man-packable and vehicle-mounted system, which will be able to be deployed on any Marine vehicle.

“This emergent technology combines a number of current capabilities into one system, thereby reducing the need for additional training and logistic support to manage multiple systems,” said Col. Dave Burton, program manager for Intelligence Systems at MCSC.

Once fielded, the system will enhance situational awareness on the battlefield.

“We will be able to do all of the functions of similar systems as well as sense and then display what is going on in the electronic spectrum,” said Dono. “Then we can communicate that to Marines for their decision-making process.”

MCSC is taking an evolutionary approach that allows the command to field the equipment faster and then gradually improve the capability as time progresses, Dono said. As the technology evolves, the Marine Corps can make incremental improvements as needed.

The Corps will work with Marines to test a variety of displays that track the electromagnetic spectrum, looking into each display’s user interface. The command can then determine if improvements must be made to ensure usability.

“It’s similar to what Apple does with the iPhone,” explained Dono. “They have many different displays and they want to make it natural and intuitive, so it’s not something that’s clunky, confusing and has to be learned.”

MCSC plans to field the vehicle-mounted system around the first quarter of 2020. When implemented, the equipment will continue to grow in capability to better prepare Marines to take on the digital battlefield.

“This system is important because it is going to allow Marines to operate inside the electromagnetic spectrum, make decisions and act upon that information,” said Dono. “That’s something they’ve never had to consider or think about in the past.”

By Matt Gonzales, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

Brigantes Presents – High Angled Solutions – Acapulka 1.35 Expedition Tour Pulk

Wednesday, March 13th, 2019

The ET 135 is the result of several years of R & D involving designers, builders, and experienced users. The R & D process has paid off with new Delta Wings that increase transverse stability and load capacity without significant sacrifices in friction or steering properties.  This makes the ET 135 excellent in the difficult terrain of the arctic circle during winter deployments.

With the load capacity matching sledges from 150-160 cm, it’s still easy to get the ET 135 to an expeditions launch point due to the fact that it’s a shorter pulk. It has Acapulka’s unique low friction runner system called STSR.  (Side Track Stabilizing Rail) which provides extraordinary glide with excellent side track and balance. As with all successful sledges, the ET 135 has a high rounded front section that helps it stay on top of deep snow.

The tough cover of the ET 135 is of top quality CORDURA. This makes the Acapulka ET 135 strong, water resistant and repellent, which is perfect for the harsh, unpredictable weather conditions of the Arctic, Antarctic and Greenland. What’s more the straps and D-rings holding your supplies are fastened directly to the hull of the sledge with solid rivets, not just sewn on the cover ensure kit is kept safe.

The extensive research and innovations made with all Acapulka pulks, is what makes them the complete solution to carry supplies during expeditions and winter deployments. For more information contact,

For international sales: international@brigantes.com

For UK sales: warrior@brigantes.com

 

Max Talk Monday: The RAID: Texas Class 2019

Monday, March 11th, 2019

This is the thirteenth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

Max Talk: The RAID  is video footage of the RAID drill at the Texas Class 2019. This was a squad level (2 x fire team) live fire training exercise against a simulated enemy encampment / patrol base. It formed part of the ‘Attack Day’ which included hasty attack and raid simulated live fire scenarios.

MVT Tactical Manual

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. 

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical