TYR Tactical

Archive for the ‘Load Carrying’ Category

MDM 17 – United States Tactical’s Reversible Chest Rig

Thursday, September 21st, 2017

It does exactly what the name implies. This chest rig reverses from PALS compatibility to four elastic slots for AR or AK magazines. Sandwiched in between is a slot which will accept maps, documents or even a holster.

IMG_4341

Made from 1000D Cordura, it also features an H-style harness. Offered in Black, Coyote or OD.

www.unitedstatestactical.com

DSEI 17 –  TYR Tactical Combat Adjustable Rifle Double Stack Mag Pouch

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

Based on a user requirement, TYR Tactical took their popular Combat Adjustable Rifle Mag Pouch and created a double stack variant. Like its thinner predecessor, it’s made from PV, accepts two 5.56 or 7.62 magazines and is adjustable via a bungee.

www.tyrtactical.com

SKD Tactical Exclusive – ESSTAC 5.56 Midlength KYWI Mag Pouch

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

esstacexclusivepouchfinal

SKD Tactical is now offering an exclusive product: ESSTAC 5.56 Midlength KYWI Mag Pouches. These pouches feature the KYWI – Kydex Wedge Inserts, which provide secure carriage of mags in an open top design, yet facilitating quick release of the magazine.

The ESSTAC 5.56 Midlength KYWI Mag Pouch is available in single, double, and triple pouch, as well as double stack pouch, configurations, in the following colors:

Multicam
Multicam Black
Multicam Tropic
Multicam Arid
Coyote Brown
Ranger Green
Wolf Grey
Black

Made in USA and Lifetime Warranty.

www.skdtac.com/searchresults.asp?Search=5.56+midlength&Submit=

DSEI 17 – TYR Tactical PICO DS Chest Rack

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

IMG_3984

The PICO-DS Assaulters Chest Rack was designed to be worn as a stand-alone rack or can be attached to the PICO-DS & PICO-MBAV Assaulters Plate Carrier via the Quick Attach Surface Mount (QASM) buckle system. Each rack comes standard with a removable H-Harness. Additionally, a removable antimicrobial/FR treated spacer mesh pad is used internally for comfort and decreased dry time in arid/tropical conditions.

It offers a GP pouch, dual pistol mags (with magnets) and four 30 round AR mag slots along the rear. Additionally, there is a small zippered pouch which will accept an M67 grenade or other items such, as SERE aids.

Coming soon.

www.tyrtactical.com

DSEI 17 – Eagle Industries Ergo Performance System

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

The Ergo Performance System is designed to fit any armor carrier system. Essentially, it offers standoff between you and the carrier and mitigates some of the energy from the weight of the carrier when moving around.

IMG_3981

When fitted inside the rear of the carrier, it disapates heat, increasing air flow/ventilation by 50%, decreasing heat under back panel of the carrier by 12-16o F, and lowers abrasion points.

IMG_3980

The Ergo Performance System is made from 500D Nylon, Dri-Lex and Squadron Laminate. It weighs 1.15 lbs and is offered in Black, Coyote and MultiCam. Part number EA-HA-CLL.

www.eagleindustries.com

DSEI 17 – TacFlex Injection Moulded Blackhawk Ammo Pouch

Wednesday, September 13th, 2017

We found this 30 round ammunition pouch while perusing the various implements of destruction at DSEI. It’s made of four injection moulded components (front, back and two sides) with a bungee holding it all together. There’s even a barrel lock at the bottom to adjust tension.

Hmmm, where have we seen that set up before? The Taco has truly inspired more magazine carriers than any other magazine carrier in history.

It attaches to belts and PALS webbing via two removable connectors.

Also available in a pistol model with an AK variant coming soon. Look for an official launch during SHOT Show.

www.blackhawk.com

FirstSpear Friday Focus – Non Stocking Non Standard – Tubes Split Front Modular Chest Rig

Friday, September 8th, 2017

IMG_3877

Originally developed for a FS professional user the Modular Split Front Chest Rig is an ultra light load bearing harness featuring a 4” Tube quick release on the front and H style adjustable back. Industry leading 6/12™ attachment fields on either side of the Tube allows complete customization with your 6/12, 6/9, or MOLLE style pockets. One size fits all with a wide range of adjustment in the shoulders and waist.

IMG_3878

Now available in the Non-stocking Non-Standard section of first-spear.com. Extremely limited quantities of Multicam only remain and no back orders will be filled.

www.first-spear.com

US Army Paratroopers Testing Airborne Tactical Assault Panel 

Monday, September 4th, 2017
The Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) rigging configurations. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of PEO Soldier)

The Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) rigging configurations. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of PEO Soldier)

Fort Bragg, North Carolina — For the first time since their inception, Army Airborne forces will soon be fielding a new fighting load system tailored to the paratrooper’s unique requirements.

“The Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) was developed with the paratrooper in mind and will allow the paratrooper a greater degree of comfort, mobility and safety during static line airborne infiltration operations,” said Rich Landry of the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center laboratories in Natick, Massachusetts.

Rich Landry of the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center laboratories in Natick, Massachusetts, demonstrates key design features included in the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) based on Soldier input. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of Natick Research laboratories)

Rich Landry of the U.S. Army Soldier Systems Center laboratories in Natick, Massachusetts, demonstrates key design features included in the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) based on Soldier input. (Photo Credit: Photo courtesy of Natick Research laboratories)

Typical Airborne troops say the legacy load carrier systems have some drawbacks.

Previous designs must be worn under the T-11 parachute harness, which is less than optimal because it does not allow for a proper fit of the main parachute harness, and moves the T-11 reserve activation handle further away from the paratrooper’s grasp.

ABN-TAP enables Soldiers to rig the fighting load under the parachute harness but below the reserve parachute.

Soldiers from the 57th Sapper Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, assemble the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) during New Equipment Training at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, before putting it through operational testing. (Photo Credit: Jim Finney, Combined Technical Services, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

Soldiers from the 57th Sapper Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, assemble the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) during New Equipment Training at Fort Bragg, North Carolina, before putting it through operational testing. (Photo Credit: Jim Finney, Combined Technical Services, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

“This will allow paratroopers to properly adjust the T-11 parachute harness to their specific sizing requirements and keep the T-11 reserve parachute handle well within reach,” said Sgt. 1st Class Ian Seymour, Test NCO from the Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate (ABNSOTD) here.

The ABN-TAP design actually draws its lineage from the older Load Bearing System (LBE) used with the T-10 and MC1-1 parachute systems by paratroopers for decades.

Soon after the Global War on Terror began, all branches of the armed services rushed to modernize field equipment to meet the rigors of modern combat and allow for the constant presence of body armor, according to Mike Tracy, deputy test division chief at ABNSOTD.

“With the vest/plate carrier systems seeing overwhelming Soldier acceptance, the task of providing the paratrooper with a modern design compatible with current parachute systems is challenging to say the least,” Tracy said.

Paratroopers assigned to the 57th Sapper Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, Fort Bragg, N.C., practice "buddy rigging" the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) at the 82nd Airborne Division Advanced Airborne School during New Equipment Training. (Photo Credit: Michael Zigmond, Audio Visual Production Specialist, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

Paratroopers assigned to the 57th Sapper Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade, Fort Bragg, N.C., practice “buddy rigging” the Airborne Tactical Assault Panel (ABN-TAP) at the 82nd Airborne Division Advanced Airborne School during New Equipment Training. (Photo Credit: Michael Zigmond, Audio Visual Production Specialist, Airborne and Special Operations Test Directorate, U.S. Army Operational Test Command)

The ABN-TAP bridges this gap by providing both new and old capabilities to the paratrooper.

Tracy explained that ABN-TAP allows not only for rigging under the parachute harness and reserve, but can be rapidly adjusted to serve as a “chest rig” design upon landing.

“Ground troops consider this to be the most efficient design under current operational conditions,” said Tracy.

“Operational testing using Airborne paratroopers, collects data which truly allows the Army to evaluate the suitability and safety of the ABN-TAP when worn during static line Airborne operations and follow-on missions,” Tracy said.

Before testing Soldiers participated in New Equipment Training (NET), which included familiarization with the system, fitting and proper rigging of the ABN-TAP with the T-11 parachute system.

Following NET, Soldiers conducted live parachute jumps from a C-17 high performance aircraft at 1,250 feet above ground level over Sicily Drop Zone here.

More senior Soldiers participating in testing were optimistic about the proposed rigging procedures.

“Having jumped the LBE system earlier in their careers, this proven rigging method signals a simple approach to a complex problem,” said Leon Price, senior ABNSOTD test officer.

“I think I benefitted personally by being a part of this,” said Spec. Aaron Adams, a Combat Engineer with the 57th Sapper Company, 27th Engineer Battalion, 20th Engineer Brigade. “I enjoyed participating in the testing because it allowed me to provide direct input into the test and I will get to see it once it is fielded to the Airborne force.”

“Any time Soldiers and their leaders get involved in operational testing, they have the opportunity to use, work with, and offer up their own suggestions on pieces of equipment that can impact development of systems that future Soldiers will use in combat,” said Col. Brad Mock, the director of all the Army’s Airborne testing.

Upon completion of testing, the ABN-TAP could potentially be issued to Army Airborne forces worldwide, signaling the first steps in modernizing the combat loads of thousands of paratroopers.

~~

The U.S. Army Operational Test Command is based at West Fort Hood, Texas, and its mission is about making sure that systems developed are effective in a Soldier’s hands and suitable for the environments in which Soldiers train and fight. Test units and their Soldiers provide feedback, by offering input to improve upon existing and future systems with which Soldiers will ultimately use to train and fight.

The Fort Bragg, North Carolina-based ABNSOTD plans, executes, and reports on operational tests and field experiments of Airborne and Special Operations Forces equipment, procedures, aerial delivery and air transportation systems in order to provide key operational data for the continued development and fielding of doctrine, systems or equipment to the Warfighter.