Tactical Tailor

Archive for the ‘Maritime’ Category

SCUABPRO Sunday – Nice to have Accessories

Sunday, January 13th, 2019

When planning a dive or a Boat/ Zodiac/ Wing ride, there are a few essential pieces of gear that you definitely should bring with you. But as much as you would want to keep your gear to a minimum, there are still a couple of things you should bring for your convenience. 

I am going to talk about a couple accessories that you may not have thought of to add to your gear list. Everyone knows about the hammock on long plane ride but not enough can be said about being comfortable on a 4-hour boat ride after a 3-hour dive. I will explain what makes them useful and why you should bring them with you. This stuff can be used if on a boat heading to a dive or if you are just on a boat for a long OTB. It’s about comfort and I will say safety.  

It all starts with a good dry bag. It’ll allow you to put all of your gear in one place, so you won’t have to worry about it getting wet or losing any of it. What makes a good dry bag? Well to start it has to have a good waterproof zipper and be able to take the beating of being bounced up and down in the front of a boat. In this bag you can keep your warm clothes for before or after the dive (if you are diving or getting wet) Always have a way to separate wet clothes from dry ones, a small or medium dry bag is good for this. That way you can put it back in away. You can also have a small camp / micro-fleece towel to help dry you off. In your bags hang a small light at the top so you can use it to look around with out having to dig around your bag trying to find whatever you need. This helps whenever you are looking in a pack at night. I like the small push button lights for this on a retractor like you use for your badge. Put one in all your bags will make your life easier when you are looking around your nags in the middle of he night when you are cold and wet.

If you can change out of your wetsuit make sure you do that, when you first get out of the water you will be hot, but if you are in for a long boat ride you will get cold. If you have a mustang suit, it is an easy thing to change into. Try and put on a base layer of wool, as you wont be completely dry wool keeps you warm even when wet. For your hands and feet. SEALKINZ make some great socks and gloves. They are waterproof and windproof. Lastly for when you get out of the water is something to eat and or drink. I am going to sound like and old man, but a thermos with hot chocolate, or soup. This will help keep you warm and also if you are cold and tired a lot better then eating a energy bar that is cold and hard. Some bite size snickers or something like that is good. They are also great for winter warfare or survival situations you can drop a bite size snickers bar into some hot water and you have a good soup.

Ok now that you are warm and dry, its time to get ready for the long boat ride home. Whenever you are on a boat the best ride is always in the back. There is less movement and its less wear and tear on you. If you are on a zodiac/ wing again try and sit in the back. If you have a stadium seat (picture below) take some one-inch tubular nylon wrap it around the seat and tie it together, put a carabiner on it to the D rings on the boat. Now you can sit on it, and it will help hold you in place and give you a better ride. This is great after a long night of being cold and wet.

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Go Sport Fin

Sunday, January 6th, 2019

 

The Go Sport Fin has a new boot fit fin design. As the name implies, SCUBAPRO new Go Sport Fin is designed for when you need a lightweight fin with a lot of power. Lightweight, comfortable, durable, and a fast and nimble performer, the Go is the ideal fin for diving, snorkeling and surface swimming. 

Lightweight: When it comes to a premium light fin, nothing compares to the Go. With integrating high quality with lightweight. This translates into convenience and weight savings on the road, and comfort and ease of use in the water. 

Super Comfortable: The Go Sport design combines the fitment benefits of an open heel fin. The replaceable self-adjusting bungee heel strap allows for a versatile fit — one diver can wear multiple sizes. The strap also makes it easy to don and doff the fin, and it fits comfortably against a booted heel. 

Ultra Durable: While extremely comfortable, the Go Sport is also virtually indestructible. Its sturdy 100% Monprene construction avoids the problems of de-lamination, broken blades and torn foot pockets that tend to plague average thermoplastic fins. This enables the Go Sport to stand up to long-term, heavy-duty use. 

High Performance: The Go fin excels in strength, comfort, and convenience, but where it really shines is in kicking performance. The Go is built with a 25° pre-angled blade with a central power panel that provides longitudinal rigidity and creates a channeling effect. Power bars on the underside of the rails prevent over-flex; this helps maintain the optimum angle of attack under high load conditions. The result: you get a lightweight fin that delivers speed, power, stability and maneuverability with a minimum of effort.

  

Travel-Friendly: Being lightweight is always a plus when traveling, but so is compactness. Go fins are designed to fit easily in IATA carry-on compliant luggage. Even better, they pack extremely well due to an innovative piggyback stack system. An interlocking tooth on one fin blade hooks into the second fin, and then the bungee strap from the second fin hooks the heel of the first fin into place. It’s a snug pairing that makes packing and traveling that much easier. The perfect addition to the SCUBAPRO fin range, the Go Sport dedicated travel fin is lightweight, comfortable and virtually indestructible.

This truly is one of the best fins I have ever used. It is very compact and light. It is great for morning PTs or when you have to carry fins out in the field. It can be used for over the beach or river and stream crossings.

www.scubapro.com

SCUBAPRO Sunday Air Consumption

Sunday, December 30th, 2018

It’s not uncommon for two divers to use different amounts of air, even if they are diving the same dive profile. Different factors will affect how much air you will consume until you learn good diving practices and buoyancy control. If you have been diving for a long time and you still go thru your air faster then the people around you, there are some things you can do to help improve your air consumption. Trying to conserve energy, controlling your breathing, and reducing your drag while diving. Planning your dive is the first step. Plan your dive to be underwater for the shortest amount of time as possible and not coming up and going off and then back on bag. If you are going to cover a lot of distance, turtleback for as long as possible to save as much air as you can.

Reducing Drag

Water provides enough resistance on your body, and it doesn’t help when you have on a bulky BC, that is sticking out like a parachute. Try and tuck away anything that hangs and floats behind you. You want your resting position in the water to be as close to horizontal as possible. This more streamlined profile results in less exertion during the dive Try and use retractors and quick magnetic clips on all gauges and hoses. They allow you to look at your gauges and when you let them go, they go right back into place. Lastly, try and keep a good body position keep your hands in front of or as close to your body as possible, and wear a BCD that fits appropriately. Some BCD has a bungee on them to keep them tighter and then when they need to be inflated; the bungee allows for that. This will significantly reduce your drag in the water and help you improve your air consumption.

Slow Down

This is why you have been taught to swim at a certain pace. Normally for combat swimmers 3 min/ 100yards. If you stay with your pace, this will help maintain your breathing rate. Your movement in the water should be minimal, try not to flail around with your arms or kick furiously. Keep each fin stroke as short as possible, as a broad stroke expends a lot more energy. Your legs use the most O2. The right pair of fins will help with this. The reason they make so many different types of fins is that everyone’s kick is different. Just because they are right for your swim buddy doesn’t mean they will be right for you.    

Relax

Be conscious of your breathing underwater. Try not to hold your breath or skip breaths. Sometimes when working and doing different things underwater, it will interrupt your normal rhythm and change your breathing without you noticing. Take slow and complete breaths, exhaling completely before inhaling. Stay warm. Know the water conditions you are going into and choose the right wetsuit thickness. Being cold drains more energy from your body that means you’ll use more air. Lastly, a quality regulator can also help make breathing more comfortable and easy to control. An old trick is to put your tongue on the roof of your mouth. This will help slow you down and lets less air in (that is the theory). If diving closed circuit make sure your mouthpiece fits property if you are moving it around a lot or if it feels like it is being pulled out or fighting to keep it in it will affect your breathing. 

Lastly, try and dive more. As the military gets back into the water, and there are more opportunities to get into the water you will get better at it. Don’t wait until you are diving as part of your work up, try and get into the water as much as you can. Then when you are in the water try and do as much as you can to wear everything you usually would, so you can get used to it and set all your gear up correctly.  

www.scubapro.com

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Gloves

Sunday, December 23rd, 2018

Having the right pair of gloves will make your life so much better when you are working in the water. Whether you are doing a two-hour dive in Norway or you are on a zodiac for a long-range OTB. The right pair of gloves will depend on what you are doing, for how long you are doing it, and the water temperature/ weather. If you need to use your hands a lot during a dive like pushing button on a Navigation board or be able to use your hand right after the dive, like climbing a ladder, shooting a gun. Your tolerance to cold will be the main factors to take into account when choosing the thickness of the gloves. The colder the water, the thicker you will need to go.

1-3mm: water between 60- 75 ° F (16-24 ° C)

5-7mm: water between 45-60° F (8-16 ° C)

Here are the two main things to think about when choosing a pair of gloves for military use.

• Freedom of movement with a minimum thickness that allows you the thermal comfort you will need.

• What is on the palm and fingers? A glove that can be used to grab and hold medal and plastic.

When you are trying them on try and grab stuff around the store.

Dive gloves come in a variety of thickness levels between 0.5mm and 7mm. A good pair of 1.5mm Tropical gloves that have a leather palm is a good start. Some Tactical gear companies are making gloves designed for being in a wet environment that are also good for diving. The WETWORX gloves from S&S Precision come in two styles. One is thinner for warmer water and one is a little thinker (2mm) for cold. I know they have put a lot of work into them and they are nice gloves. As more units get back into the water, I am hoping you can get more companies like S&S that will make gear for use in the water.  That said S&S makes all their stuff so it can be used in the water as they come from a water background. I like gloves that can hold on to medal like if you have to climb a caving ladder or hold onto a gun. Being able to hold plastic like a navigation board or buckles. Some gloves have small plastic beads that are not the best for working in the water. It is hard to find a good pair of thick dive gloves that meet the above requirements. If you have to be on a boat or mostly about the water you can get a pair of dive gloves that are a couple sizes bigger, then you usually would wear and put wool gloves on as a base layer. Wool even when wet, will still hold heat in and the dive gloves will help keep your hands warm and dry. You can also bring a thinner set of gloves like 1.5mm with you and change them out a couple of minutes before you hit the target. The other thing you can try with a thinker pair of gloves is putting a set of gardening gloves on over them.

When choosing the right glove, they should fit well enough to avoid water circulation inside as much as possible this will help keep the heat in also. They should not be so tight that it will cut off circulation to your hands. The thicker the gloves, the more insulated you have, but the tradeoff is less mobility. It will be difficult to manipulate the equipment and also to done and doff them. Choose the gloves that you think will protect you enough for the type of water in which you will perform most dives. If you are diving a semi-dry suit, choose gloves that don’t have a zipper or Velcro. It will make it easier to place the glove in the most sealed way possible between the inner and outer layers of the suit. You will want them to fit close to your wrist to reduce the bulge that can happen if there is too much material between your sleeves and gloves. If you don’t do this right just moving your hands will let water in.

The material the gloves are made of should align with your intended purpose.

• Kevlar: This material is known for its elasticity and strength. It increases the durability of gloves by avoiding premature deterioration.

• Neoprene: This is the most common type of material used for dive gloves because it’s flexible and mainly designed for use in the water.

• Dyneema: It is an ultra-abrasion resistant, strong material. It is suitable for working around piers and ship bottoms. Dyneema isn’t designed for warm, but it will protect your hands,

• Amara is synthetic leather that is usually used on the palm of a lot of dive gloves. It increases your grip. Most tropical dive gloves palms use Amara

Dive Gloves Maintenance Tips

Treat dive gloves like you treat anything you want to last. You should care for gloves like you do your wetsuit. They should soaked in fresh water after each dive. You want to force the salt out. Do not put them in the washing machine or use detergents to clean your wetsuits or gloves. Allow them to dry in a ventilated place until completely dry. Textile gloves, take longer to dry. Do not dry them in the sun, as with all neoprene it will cause it to age faster.

www.scubapro.com

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Drysuits

Sunday, December 16th, 2018

Now that is starting to get cold I thought it would be good to share some Drysuits/ Semi- Dry suit info. David Rhea is a SCUBAPRO ambassador and one of the best explorer divers in the world.

To watch the entire library of SCUBAPRO Drysuit Videos, visit YouTube.

SCUBAPRO Sunday – The Go FIN

Sunday, December 9th, 2018

The SCUBAPRO’s GO fin is designed for traveling or when you need a smaller fin with a lot of power. Lightweight, comfortable, durable, and a fast and agile performer, the GO is the ideal fin for divers, snorkelers and is also great for command PT as it is a great surface fin also. The Go Fin comes in two styles. The Go fin is perfect for when you want to just wear the fin with nothing else. The Newer version is the GO SPORT. It is the same great fin but with a bigger foot pocket for use with shoes or dive boots. When it comes to premium travel fins, nothing compares to the GO and GO SPORT (boot fit) when integrating high quality with lightweight. For example, a pair of size M-L GO fins weighs in at a mere 1.2 kg/2.6 lbs, including bungee straps — again, that’s for a pair. This translates into convenience and weight savings when they have to be carried, and comfort and ease of use in the water. The replaceable self-adjusting bungee heel strap allows for a versatile fit — one diver can wear multiple sizes. The strap also makes it easy to don and doff the fin, and it fits comfortably against a barefoot is needed.

While extremely comfortable, the GO is also virtually indestructible. Its strong 100% Monprene® construction avoids the problems of de-lamination, broken blades and torn foot pockets that tend to plague average thermoplastic fins. This enables the GO to stand up to long-term, heavy-duty use. The GO fin excels in strength, comfort, and convenience, but where it really shines is in kicking performance. The GO is built with a 25-degree pre-angled blade with a Central Power Panel that provides longitudinal rigidity and creates a channeling effect. Power Bars on the underside of the rails prevent over-flex; this helps maintain the optimum angle of attack under high load conditions. The result is you get a lightweight fin that delivers speed, power, stability, and maneuverability with a minimum of effort. Being lightweight is always a plus when traveling, but so is compactness. GO fins are designed to fit comfortably in IATA carry-on compliant luggage. Even better, they pack exceptionally well due to an innovative Piggy Back Stack system. An interlocking tooth on one fin blade hooks into the second fin, and then the bungee strap from the second fin hooks the heel of the first fin into place. It’s a snug pairing that makes packing and traveling that much easier. They are perfect for when you have to carry a pair of fins with on patrol. They pack light and right; the GO fin is lightweight, comfortable and virtually indestructible. This is an excellent fin for surface swimming, SAR, diving in confined spaces and just everyday diving.

www.scubapro.com

FirstSpear Friday Focus – Maritime Buoyancy Compensator Technology

Friday, December 7th, 2018

FirstSpear is well known for high quality body armor systems and performance technical apparel. What you may not know is they also develop specialized gear for some of the most highly trained amphibious military and law enforcement professionals all over the world. The AAC Frog Kit, for example was developed for the combat diver and specifically designed to integrate with a rebreather system. Today we are looking at just one of the unique features that makes FirstSpear Maritime equipment a top choice by the professional.

The FirstSpear Buoyancy Compensator Kit is designed to be installed inside the plate bag behind the front and back plate pockets. Orally inflated at the operators discretion, you can achieve a maximum of 5lbs (2kg/22N) of lift on each front and back insert in a size Medium – XL to help offset a combat load on the surface in sea water.

Buoyancy Compensators Kits are user configured and can be set up for not only right or left handed users but also single and dual inflate options which give the Operator even more control on how they can trim their system while in the water.

This video shows how to set up your BC kit and the user configurations available. Law Enforcement and Military credentials required for purchase. Contact us for more info.

Learn more about FirstSpear industry leading manufacturing and technology integration for personal protective and load bearing equipment on first-spear.com

To learn more about FirstSpear Technology Group visit First-spear.tech

SCUBAPRO Sunday – “The Silent Enemy”

Sunday, December 2nd, 2018

Here is a movie about the, Lionel “Buster” Crabbe is the father combat diving in the UK. Thought you might like it.