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TYR Tactical Tuesday – Huron Collapsible Direct Action Assaulters Pack – MV

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

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The Huron™ Collapsible Direct Action Assaulters Pack – MV (HRN-DAAP-MV) attaches to all TYR Tactical® Plate Carriers with 11” back panel zippers. This attachment system allows for a quick disconnect and reconnect of the pack to your carrier. The DAAP-MV may also be utilized as a Stand-Alone Pack with its two low profile shoulder straps. The shoulder straps can be removed or remain on the pack when attached to the carrier, this allows the user to remove the pack from their carrier and then quickly don the pack again via the shoulder carry straps. The DAAP-MV can carry hydration, a 117-G Radio and/or other equipment for various mission sets. It also features a zippered expandable main compartment that has two antenna/cable routing ports, an internal hydration pocket with top hydration port, two external general purpose pockets and a removable beavertail for storing a helmet or transitional garments.

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The DAAP-MV can also be attached to other plate carrier brands by purchasing the TYR Tactical® 11″ Zipper Adapters (SOLD SEPARATELY).  The TYR-AZPR001 MOLLE to the back of any plate carrier or vest that has 1 column/6 rows of MOLLE webbing.

Wt: 1.55 lbs.
Dim: 13.25” H x 9.25” W x 3” or 5”D
Cubic Liters: 8.86L – 12.88L (Collapsible Main Compartment & Two GP Pockets)

Design Features:
• 500d Cordura®
• Collapsible Main Compartment from 5” to 3”
• Top Loading
• Carry Handle
• Qty.1 Tapered GP Pocket 4.75”H x 7.50”W x 2”D
• Qty.1 Padded Bottom GP Pocket 6”H 8.50”W x 2”D
• Removable Poly Mesh Beavertail
• Attaches to all TYR Tactical® Plate Carriers with 11” back panel zippers
• Removable Yoke/Shoulder Straps
• Hydration Pocket

PROJECT7 Integrated Load Bearing System – Assault Pack

Tuesday, September 18th, 2018

Manufactured from Cordura and Blue Force Gear Ultracomp, the ILB-AP is designed specifically to integrate with the PROJECT7 armor.

Meanwhile, In Japan

Sunday, September 16th, 2018

Dana Gleason defines “Big in Japan” both literally and figuratively.

High Angle Solutions – Brigantes Presents – UK issue Bergan compared to Snigel Designs Rucksack

Wednesday, September 5th, 2018

All light role troops understand the pain and discomfort associated with carrying your own body weight on your back.  It is something that you just have to get used to.  However, with recent high injury rates from nerve damage due to carrying heavy loads we wanted to look at what we choose to carry on our backs.

The UK issue Personal Load Carrying Equipment (PLCE) Bergan has been around for decades in various forms. Originally derived from the Berghaus Cyclops Roc it has moved further and further away from its high-quality ancestor.  The current version follows the same design format and uses 1000 denier MTP fabric.  The back system is simple, in the extreme, and has more in common with what you would find on a daysack not something that you would use to carry 100+lbs.  It is functional from the point of view of its pockets and layout and has become integrated into the way that the UK troops operate in the field.

The Snigel 90Ltr shows many similarities with its pocket structure and style.  Other than that they could not be further apart.  Now used by a number of specialist units the pack has a full modern back system that you would expect to see on the best civilian rucksacks.  The foam used in the shoulder straps is of the highest possible standard and addresses the nerve damage issue associated with the issue Bergan. This is also helped by a very substantial waist belt. The rucksack uses a 500 denier Multicam fabric which is lighter and more flexible than the 1000 denier but does not compromise on robustness.

If you are required to carry all your kit on your back, then it is absolutely paramount that the piece of equipment you use to hold it is comfortable and reliable.  The issue Bergan falls well short of what can now be achieved.  Time for a change we feel. What do you think?

For more information get in touch by email on international@brigantes.com or for UK customers warrior@brigantes.com.  

www.brigantes.com

Brigantes Presents – High Angle Solutions – Deuter Alpine Guide 35+ MultiCam

Wednesday, August 1st, 2018

Following two years of hard work Deuter Alpine Guide 35 in Multicam is now available.  Fresh into the warehouse this classic mountain rucksack has been updated and modified to suit the needs of operators in the mountain environment.

Using the Deuter Alpine, X-Frame back system the pack is one of the most stable and comfortable packs to carry.  The lid is extendable to accommodate expanded loads and allow for ropes or other pieces of hardwear.  In order to maximise functionality it has a long side opening zip, which allows you to access the full body of the pack without disturbing the load under the lid or having to completely empty the pack.

The hip belt is removable and uses the Vari-Flex system, which enables it to move with you when moving thereby improving comfort and performance. A double pull waist belt gives secure adjustment and the sternum strap helps the load to remain in the right place on your shoulders.

The pack comes with a removeable sit mat and is compatible with hydration bladders up to 3 Litres.  The sides of the pack provide ski loops and the front of the pack has points for two ice axes.

Overall this is the pack for mountain operations.  It has long been the go to pack for people working in the mountains and is the only option for the military mountaineer.

For more information contact tribe@brigantes.com

For international sales contact international@brigantes.com

(High Angle Solutions is a weekly series of articles focusing on military mountaineering solutions. It’s brought to you by UK-based Brigantes Consulting, in conjunction with several other brands, both here in the US and abroad. This week, it’s 

ThirdBlockGear – Genesis of the Observer Kit

Sunday, July 29th, 2018

Mogadishu, Somalia, July 2011 – Somalia was in the midst of an ongoing civil war and a severe famine, brought about by a drought and a lack of governance. The famine ultimately kills over two hundred thousand civilians. The capital city, Mogadishu, was largely controlled by the UN-recognized Transitional Federal Government, supported by African Union troops. The Islamic extremist insurgent group, Al-Shabab controlled pockets of the city, and tribal in-fighting continued. While the city itself, the airport, and nearby port, were mostly controlled by the TFG, Al-Shabab, controlled the surrounding countryside. Fighting was ongoing, despite the humanitarian crisis killing thousands. We were tasked with evaluating if, and how, civilian aid organizations could respond to the humanitarian crisis and deliver desperately needed food, water, and medicine.

While this was not my first experience with overseas travel, conflicts, humanitarian work, and civ-mil partnerships, this was my first time totally unsupported in a place where the nearest decent hospital was the next country over, there was no infrastructure, such as phones or electricity, and we were completely surrounded by the enemy. There was no QRF, no support, no logistics, and no security beyond what the local TFG could provide. We needed to bring everything required to sustain ourselves and collect the information needed. I knew there wouldn’t be a Best Buy or even a tourist camera store in-country. And we had to keep it all under 20kg (UN flight weight restrictions), go through commercial security and customs in various airports, and be easily carried (didn’t expect luggage trolleys, turns out there weren’t any).

The plan was for a three week trip, basing out of Nairobi, Kenya while sorting transit in and out of Mogadishu, which was still sketchy. For some reason neither Orbitz nor Expedia had flights or good hotel recommendations for Mogadishu. We expected at least two weeks in Somalia. So pack two weeks of clothes, toiletries, food, water, coffee, power, comms, technical data collections gear, etc. 20kg. Cool. No problem. Right? The working model in my head was, sustainment gear stowed at the safe house and essential mission and “Oh Shit” gear carried with me in a backpack. Recharge batteries at night, do processing and uploading then, etc. What is it they say about plans of mice and men? Fortunately, I wasn’t wholly unprepared or completely wrong in my planning, but a lot of frustrating shortcomings were discovered. So now I’ll highlight the Lessons Learned that drove me to develop the Observer Kit:

1) Power, Power, Power. Looking back, my “conservative” guess about worst-case availability of infrastructure turned out to be a bit optimistic. The nature of the physical threat, the security precautions demanded, as well as the ops tempo also threw my preparations a curve ball. Working overseas is not the same as camping or hiking. Solar is great. Particularly when there is little-to-no power infrastructure. But when you are working, you are on-the-go, constantly getting in and out of vehicles, and not always the same ones. The safe house we were staying in was great. They even occasionally ran a generator for a few hours a night to give us a little power. How many outlets do you think are going to be free and how soon till a surge breaker trips? Just imagine how many others are struggling with their power budget.

2) Backpacks suck. Being constantly on the move, in and out of vehicles, walking through crowded areas, and needing quick access to your gear make the backpack form factor far less than ideal. Again, working overseas is not the same as camping. In uniform you have a plate carrier or vest rig and probably a belt where constant use items can be grabbed quickly and easily. The camera, voice recorder, or GPS sitting in your backpack, does you no good in a vehicle or on the move. You have no visibility or control over the pack on your back in a crowded market or street. And few backpacks have things like pockets for satellite antennas that need constant view of the sky. Which brings me to my next point:

Communications are critical. Mogadishu is one of the more extreme environments but disasters, conflicts, or mass scale events can also make communications difficult. We had a single (!) satellite phone for emergency use and expected to have access to some other communications networks. We needed to connect with people who sometimes had no local phone or SIM card at all. Most carriers blocked international calls. Keeping track of the different carriers required to talk to different people and the multiple phones was another complication. And my wife was Not Happy with me going dark for long stretches. If the team got separated, who had the sat phone? Over the years there have been other Lessons Learned in this category but these got me started.

4) Semper Gumby. You’d be amazed at the Opportunities To Excel found in these environments. Being able to solve, hack, or improvise around problems that wouldn’t exist back home can have a dramatic impact on effectiveness. Things like copying and moving data that would normally be as simple as emailing someone a spreadsheet or photocopying some pages can be serious obstacles to operations. Fixing (or sometimes breaking) things in a pinch, is needed more often than you’d suspect. The Marine credo “Forever Flexible” or “Improvise, Adapt, Overcome” should be taken to heart.

5) Hygiene helps. Hygiene and comfort are more difficult than you expect, but are worth tackling if you can keep it fast, light, and compact. Keeping you effective so that you can accomplish your goals is worth some effort. Time is often more scarce than running water, however.

Conclusion. At that time we were purely a consulting company with no interest in manufacturing or selling gear. The week I returned I started looking everywhere on the market for solutions and improvements. Nothing quite fit the requirements. So I reached out to a friend who runs Zulu Nylon Gear to make a custom sling bag for us and proceeded to hack, tweak, and customize the kit around this new wearable platform. Over the years it’s been refined and refactored countless times. Experiences in diverse climates like the Philippines and Iraq drove comfort tweaks. Constant heavy use and new offerings on the market improved capabilities and features. I’m proud of what’s been built and have had a lot of requests from other users in the field to purchase our kits. So now we are offering them to the general market. Everything we sell is gear that we rely on and use in the field ourselves. Take a look at our SSR Kits and our Observer System or ping us for other custom solutions.

Observer Kit in the Philippines, doing wide area assessment after Typhoon Yolanda, NOV 2013

thirdblockgear.com

This is the final bag design.

LBT Inc – Small Modular Comms Pack

Thursday, July 19th, 2018

LBT Inc displayed their new Small Modular Comms Pack during last week’s ADS Warrior East.

The pack was designed for the specifically for the AN/PRC-117G, but is capable of holding other models thanks to its internal strap adjustment. It also features a hook and loop window at the top to access keypad/comms jacks.

In addition to removable, padded shoulder straps, the pack will attach to various platforms via a zip-off, integrated PALS panel.

*The pictures taken at Warrior East represent the latest model while the Black zippered version is an early prototype.

www.lbtinc.com

LBT – Small Vented Comms Pack

Monday, June 18th, 2018

This is smaller version of LBT’s Vented Comms Pack. Both were designed to combat radio overheating. It accepts PALS equipped pouches and offers four external, zippered pockets. The pack is also reinforced with HANK.

The pack is padded to protect the communications gear, but incorporates venting. For example, there is a mesh vent at the bottom which can be opened.

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The interior is designed for the radio to be strapped into place but accessories can be mounted, by themselves, or in pouches to the pile field interior.

Above, you can see that the pack is PALS compatible and can be attached to a variety of platforms, including a modular frame. There are also removable shoulder straps and waist belt.

www.lbtinc.com