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Archive for the ‘Parachuting’ Category

S&S Precision Maker Monday – NavBoard FlipMod

Wednesday, January 11th, 2017

Its not Monday but we’re hosting a Maker’s Monday anyway, what with SHOT Show less than a week away.

Our newest addition to the NavBoards comes with the release of the FlipMod, whose intuitive design and configurability makes it stand out in the crowd. The NavBoard FlipMod can be previewed at SHOT Show 2017 booth #8206.

www.sandsprecision.com

SSD Saturday Night At The Movies Presents Classix: Die Luftwaffe der Bundeswehr 

Sunday, December 11th, 2016

Thulsa Doom turned me on to this cool Cold War-era (1968), German documentary, entitied “Classix: Die Luftwaffe der Bundeswehr zeigt ihr Können während der Übung „schneller Pfeil“ which showcases their aerial delivery and Close Air Support capabilities during exercise Fast Arrow. Watching an F104 deliver CAS is priceless.

Gentex Corporation Partners with The Red Devils to Promote Parachutist Safety

Thursday, November 17th, 2016

The company’s Ops-Core FAST Carbon Helmets to be worn by the Devils during water jumps and team training

Carbondale, PA, November 16, 2016. Gentex Corporation, a global leader in personal protection and situational awareness solutions for defense forces, emergency responders, and industrial personnel has partnered with The Red Devils, the official parachute display team of both The Parachute Regiment (The Paras) and the British Army to promote soldier safety. As part of the agreement, Gentex Corporation will provide its Ops-Core FAST Carbon High Cut Helmet to each of the 12 members of The Red Devils to use during their promotional water jumps and for team training.

“Gentex is proud to have the opportunity to support The Red Devils in their mission to promote The Paras and the British Army, both long time customers of Gentex Corporation,” said Tom Short, vice president ground systems, Gentex Corporation. “Through this partnership we’ll also have the opportunity to help promote our common goal of advancing parachuting and skydiving safety.”

Corporal Nathan Connolly, Red Devils Team Leader, commented, “As a team we always seek to push the boundaries of display parachuting to ensure that we continuously showcase original and exciting displays. Our new partnership with Gentex Corporation equips our team with the advanced Ops-Core helmet, allowing us to train and practice new canopy formations with a helmet that provides outstanding protection. In addition to its safety features, the Ops-Core helmet also enables us to maintain perfect all round observation and clear voice communication; key components when practicing Canopy Relative Work.”

The streamlined design and durable, lightweight carbon construction of the Ops-Core FAST Carbon High Cut Helmet provide parachutists an unobstructed field of view, comfort, and industry leading blunt trauma protection. Other key performance and safety features of the FAST Carbon Helmet include Accessory Rail Connectors (ARCs) that allow the helmet to be easily, and fully customized with situational awareness and other performance enhancing accessories, plus a 4-Point Chinstrap that provides comfort and stability, and allows for the convenient donning and doffing of communication headsets with internal headbands.

With its unique system design and rail technology for mounting helmet accessories, Ops-Core is today’s leading brand of modular, scalable, open-architecture helmet systems for elite defense and security forces. Ops-Core helmet platforms and components are designed to seamlessly work together to provide true system level performance for the modern soldier.

Airborne Systems Releases the Hi-5

Tuesday, October 4th, 2016

PENNSAUKEN, NJ October 3rd, 2016: Airborne Systems North America proudly presents the Hi-5® as the latest addition to our line of High Performance Ram Air Parachutes. The Hi-5® is truly unique among military parachutes, demonstrating exceptional ram air glide performance while allowing glide modulation to descend quickly and land accurately. The Hi-5® has a remarkable 5.5:1 glide ratio and can transition to a 1:1 glide ratio with a simple control input using the Glide Modulation System. Unlike other methods of angle control, such as front riser trim tabs, Airborne Systems Glide Modulation System does not increase the total speed of the canopy, providing a safe transition at any altitude. This eliminates the need for multiple spirals or S-turns at low altitude, and allows for extremely accurate landings using safe straight-in approaches. The jumper is in total control of where they are and when they arrive on target. This groundbreaking technology is exclusive to Airborne Systems Hi-5®.

In addition to the leap forward in glide ratio technology, the Hi-5® is also easy to maintain and handle for a jumper, and very intuitive to pack for a rigger. The Hi-5® bridges the gap between the Intruder®/RA-1 and our Hi-Glide parachutes, providing a wing with a high glide, accurate landings, and the ability to descend into tight areas safely.

To learn more about this new product, visit http://airborne-sys.com/.

PM SCIE Conducts Airborne Testing At Ft Bragg With RA-1 Parachute

Thursday, September 8th, 2016

This week members of PEO Soldier’s Program Manager – Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment went skydiving conducted testing of some new tachnologies while jumping the Military Freefall Advanced Ram Air Parachute System (MFF ARAPS) RA-1 at Raeford DZ, near Fort Bragg, NC.

PEO Soldier’s airdrop team out of Fort Belvoir, VA worked with support from NSRDEC Engineers and NET trainers from Prince George, VA, Yuma, AZ and Fort Bragg, NC.

The RA-1 (NSN 1670-01-606-1897) has been adopted by the US Army and is currently in service. It consists of the Intruder® 360 main parachute, the Intruder® 360 reserve parachute, and the Raider 2 harness/container manufactured by Airborne Systems.

The Leaf- Chronical Presents – VETERANS: Parachutists have special evidence for claims

Thursday, August 25th, 2016

Normally, I wouldn’t link to an article from a site owned by Gannett, but this op-ed is some good advice for US military Veterans who are seeking VA compensation for injuries arising from parachute duties. I served on jump status in both the Army and Air Force and the AF took it much more seriously from a medical viewpoint because parachutist duties were considered flight status. Consequently, parachutist were more likely to hide or at least downplay medical conditions in order to remain in status. After a career, they take their toll. If you’re in the same boat, this article by Sandy Britt For The Leaf-Chronicle is worth the read.

Many veterans who were on jump status avoided going to sick call while on active duty so as not to be taken off of jump status, or because it was frowned upon by their command….For example, veterans who were on jump status and earned one of the parachutist badges have concrete evidence of the number of jumps they completed. It’s a known medical fact that parachuting puts abnormal, traumatic pressure on joints, especially knees, feet, ankles, hips and spine, and as a result, chronic joint disabilities usually follow….read the rest at www.theleafchronicle.com/story/news/2016/07/16/veterans-parachutists-special-evidence-claims.

Today is National Airborne Day

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016

Just thought all of the legs out there should know.

Carry on, that is all.

Natick Civilian Graduates From Jump School

Friday, June 24th, 2016

Every once in awhile, the civilian staff at the Natick Soldier Systems Center get to attend military courses. For example, I know a guy who went to jumpmaster school while he was in jump status as a civilian there after having served on active duty in the Army. Others have attended mountaineering courses with the nearby Vermont Army National Guard.

Recently, Jennifer Hunt, a textile technologist/materials engineer on the Aerial Delivery Engineering Support Team, or ADEST, at the Army Natick Soldier Research, Development and Engineering Center graduated from the Basic Airborne Course.

“I wanted to go and have the experience of using and jumping the parachute equipment I work with and inspect every day,” said Hunt. “The opportunity has given me a different and fuller perspective of the work I do for ADEST and has made me better qualified to do my job”

I’m very impressed with Ms Hunt’s effort here. Most people who attend are in their late teens and early 20s. She is 41 years old! That means she had to get an age waiver to attend. Not shabby, especially for a civilian employee.

Having never served in the military, she spent a year training to the APFT’s 17-21 age group standard and worked on pull-ups. Ms Hunt is under five feet tall so she had to jump to grasp the bar. That’s one dedicated lady.

Congratulations to Ms Jennifer Hunt.

Airborne!

To learn more, visit www.army.mil/article/170170/natick_civilian_takes_giant_leap_to_learn_more_about_soldier_equipment