ADS is here to support your EOY Purchases.

Archive for the ‘Parachuting’ Category

US Army Evaluates UK’s Hung Up Parachutist Release Assembly

Sunday, August 19th, 2018

ABERDEEN PROVING GROUND, Md. — Jumping out of a plane may be a routine part of an airborne Soldier’s training, but if the equipment doesn’t function properly, it can be deadly.

“Generally, there are a handful of towed jumpers per year, which can be potentially dangerous situations,” said Samuel Corner, project manager for the U.S. Army Research, Development and Engineering Command Soldier Center Aerial Delivery Directorate.

Until recently, there were two ways to help a towed jumper, which occurs when the static line attached to the aircraft anchor cable becomes tangled with the jumper and/or the equipment and the parachute is not released — cut the jumper’s static line so the Soldier can deploy his or her reserve parachute or pull the Soldier back into the aircraft. Both scenarios are dangerous because the Soldier is dragged alongside or behind the aircraft until he is either released or pulled into the aircraft.

In March 2017, in an effort to eliminate the possibility of a towed jumper situation, the Aerial Delivery Directorate’s Airdrop Technology team submitted a project proposal to the U.S. Army Foreign Comparative Testing Program, which is embedded in RDECOM’s Global Technology Office, as part of their annual call for proposals. The proposal was selected, enabling the Airdrop Technology Team to purchase ten Hung Up Parachutist Release Assemblies, or HUPRA, from the United Kingdom company, IrvinGQ (formally Airborne Systems Europe) for tests and evaluation.

A simulated towed jumper scenario is created during U.S. Army testing with a mannequin that is towed behind an aircraft. The new system includes an emergency parachute that is released once the jumpmaster cuts the aircraft anchor line cable. (Photos Credit: U.S. Army photo )

The HUPRA, which includes an emergency parachute that is released once the Jumpmaster cuts the aircraft anchor line cable, is manufactured by IrvinGQ in the UK. The HUPRA is used by the UK as well as other nations on C-130 and other military aircraft.

By purchasing the system from the UK, the Army saved approximately $500,000 in non-recurring engineering costs and additional costs to develop, integrate and validate a new recovery system.

“Testing, which includes aircraft time and manpower to design validation tests, is very expensive,” Corner said. “We built on efforts of the UK by using their lessons learned to accelerate our process and decrease our costs.”

The tests, which were conducted at Yuma Proving Ground, Arizona, used mannequins that “jumped” out from the aircraft’s side doors and ramp. The testing was conducted on C-130 aircraft and divided into seven phases; minor changes were made to the system after the first phase was completed.

Before a Soldier jumps out of an aircraft, a Jumpmaster conducts a personnel inspection of the Soldier’s attaching, jumping and releasing equipment. Jumpmasters must complete a rigorous training program before they manage airborne jump operations.

A complete developmental test was performed on the Towed Jumper Recovery System (the Army name for the slightly modified HUPRA) at YPG, including aircraft procedures development, safety evaluation, rigging procedure development and performance testing.

One of the goals of the tests was to ensure the system recovered with an All Up Weight maximum of 400 pounds, slightly above the UK’s fielded version of the HUPRA systems capabilities. AUW includes the weight of the Soldier, the weight of the parachute system, which is approximately 40 pounds, and the weight of the equipment that Soldier needs for a mission — rucks, guns, ammunition, food and water.

While Standard Operating Procedures were developed based on the C-130 aircraft that was used during testing, another set of SOPs will be developed for C-17 aircraft, which is a much larger aircraft that the Army uses.

“The TJRS program has been positively briefed to the Army Airborne Board,” Corner said. “The next step is to work with the board and TRADOC to develop a formal requirement for a jumper recovery system. After that, the project will transition to PM Soldier Clothing and Individual Equipment, under PEO Soldier.”

The Foreign Comparative Testing program is a congressionally authorized program that is executed for the Army by the RDECOM Global Technology Office, which receives oversight from the Office of the Secretary of Defense, Comparative Technology Office. The FCT Program provides an avenue for Army engineers, scientists and program managers to acquire, test, and evaluate items and technologies from foreign industry allies and other friendly nations that may fill an Army capability gap or other urgent need.

By Argie Sarantinos-Perrin, RDECOM

It’s National Airborne Day

Thursday, August 16th, 2018

Conversation a few years ago at the dinner table.

So one of my sons asks me, “Dad, what’s a leg?”

I answered, “Everyone on your mother’s side of the family son.”

True story…

He’s now 18 and started his path toward an A license while waiting in DEP to join the service.

Happy Airborne Day to all of you Paratroopers out there!

You Never Stop Being A Paratrooper

Sunday, August 5th, 2018

Some of you know this man. He has been a Paratrooper for a long time.

A U.S. Army Paratrooper practices Sustained Airborne Training during Leapfest 2018 at the University of Rhode Island in West Kingston, R.I., Aug. 1, 2018. Leapfest is the largest, longest-standing, international static line parachute training event and competition hosted by the 56th Troop Command, Rhode Island Army National Guard, to promote high level technical training and esprit de corps within the International Airborne community. Over 300 Paratroopers from nine different countries are participating this year. (U.S. Army photo by Staff Sgt. Justin P. Morelli)

S&S Precision Shop Show – S&S Precision ZipFlip

Tuesday, July 10th, 2018

31DA89EA-40D5-422C-81ED-8E16E219A65E

S&S Precision developed the ZipFlip to satisfy a user requirement for a scalable chest mount for ATAK equipped Android devices which could be worn while attached to armor or in a stand-alone configuration, while parachuting or conducting mounted and dismounted operations.

F58566C4-7E46-429B-94A6-C725B0C228D2

The basic component is a NavBoard which can be used by itself but will also accept a removable soft pouch, sun shade, auxiliary battery pouch and stand alone harness.

43A222D7-E9CF-41CA-8DB6-381DAAB3699C

The system is PALS compatible via the S&S Precision Tenacious Tab.

1E604AF4-9EF8-45A3-A977-3AFDAD9833CF

The Android device is secured to the NavBoard via a low-profile cinch lock. Additionally, cables and excess cinch lock material can be stored between the NavBoard and soft case.

1176D6A2-C56F-4411-BF15-772B15CBD84B

A removable stand-alone harness is included for operations where Armor is not needed such as admin jumps.

45917D9E-AB62-4190-B940-E466329A9B02

The FlipZip can be secured via a zipper Er with dual slides.

img_2574.jpg

www.sandsprecision.com

Leapfest 18

Monday, July 9th, 2018

Although registration is now closed, Leapfest will host teams of parachute trained Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, and Airmen from nine countries:

– Special Operations Detachment – OTAN/NATO, Maryland National Guard

12 Air Assault (Minden) Battery, 12th Regiment Royal Artillery

– Directorate of Special Operations, Botswana Defense Force

– US Army Airborne School, Fort Benning

– 82nd Airborne Division

E Company (LRS/ABN), 134th Infantry Regiment

– 160th Special Operations Aviation Regiment, U.S. Army Special Operations Command

– Associazione Nazionale Paracadutisti d’Italia

– 3 Commando Brigade Royal Marines

– 19th Special Forces Group, Airborne

21 Air Assault (Gibraltar) Battery, 32 Regiment Royal Artillery

– II Squadron RAF Regiment

B Company, 3rd Battalion, Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry

Joint Communications Support Element

– 18th Air Support Operations Group, Fort Bragg, N.C.

– 195th Quartermaster Detachment & 195th Forward Support Company (Special Operations)(Airborne), Nebraska Army National Guard

– 16 Air Assault Brigade

7th Parachute Regiment Royal Horse Artillery

23 Parachute Engineer Regiment

– Parachute Signals Recruiting and Induction

– The Parachute Regiment

– 4th Battalion The Parachute Regiment – 4 PARA

16 Medical Regiment

13 Air Assault Support Regiment

8 Parachute Field Company Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers

U.S. Army Special Operations Aviation Command

– 11 Luchtmobiele Brigade – air assault “7 december”

C Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 143rd Infantry Regiment

– U.S. Army Natick Soldier Research Development and Engineering Center

– 1st Battalion (Airborne), 509th Infantry Regiment, JRTC and Fort Polk

B Company, 1st Battalion (Airborne), 143rd Infantry Regiment

165th Quartermaster Company (Brigade Aerial Delivery Support)

– 17th Special Tactics Squadron, Air Force Special Operations Command

– 3rd Air Support Operations Squadron, Joint Base Elmendorf-Richardson JBER (official)

25th Air Support Operations Squadron

Luftlandebrigade 1 “SAARLAND”

14th Air Support Operations Squadron

Companie A, 3e Battalion, Royal 22e Régiment

– Special Operations Detachment-Global, Rhode Island National Guard

– 44 Parachute Brigade, South African Defense Force

– Aerial Delivery & Field Services Department, Quartermaster School

– 43. výsadkový prapor Chrudim

Successful SOF Combat Jump with SureFire MasterFire & Ryder9-Ti Suppressor

Friday, June 1st, 2018

Recently a US Special Operations team successfully conducted the first night combat jump relying on the MasterFire Holster to retain a handgun suppressed by a SureFire Ryder9-Ti suppressor. The MasterFire performed as designed, validating the concept and fulfilling the requirement. SureFire takes great pride in manufacturing the best possible equipment for those who go in harm’s way, or anyone who demands the ultimate in quality, innovation, and performance.

US Army MOLLE 4000 – Your New Airborne Ruck

Sunday, April 22nd, 2018

When the 82nd called in a request, Natick delivered. The response: the latest iteration of the Army’s airborne rucksack, the Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000. Formatted to address the needs of the 82nd Airborne Division, the mid-sized rucksack has been designed, tested, and is now slated for limited distribution. Fabricated with both sewn-on and removable pouches, the MOLLE 4000 should be versatile enough for Army-wide utilization of the system.

Operations Sergeant, Human Resources Development Division (HRDD), Staff Sgt. Anthony Sandoval, demonstrates the redesigned Modular Lightweight Load-Carrying Equipment (MOLLE) 4000. Developed by Load Carriage Systems, Product Manager, Solider Clothing and Individual Equipment at Natick, Soldier Systems Center, the mid-size ruck has a larger top flap and more spacious leg storage pockets than previous versions of MOLLE. Additionally, the MOLLE 4000 has an internal radio/equipment pocket and a lengthened back pad for increased comfort. (Photo Credit: Mr. David Kamm (RDECOM))

“The beauty is, we designed a rucksack specifically for the airborne community, however, non-airborne units can use this rucksack just as effectively by just not being issued the airborne harness components, ” said Rich Landry, Individual Equipment Designer with Load Carriage Systems, Product Manager, Solider Clothing and Individual Equipment.

A former Pathfinder with the 82nd, Landry understands the needs of the Airborne community. Through communication with the 82nd, and other Army units, Landry obtained the feedback necessary to improve the rucksack, a critical tool for deployed Soldiers. This final design borrows elements from the old ALICE pack, and earlier versions of MOLLE. After listening to critiques of previous equipment, Landry determined adjusting weight distribution was key.

“One of the critical design issues is, you must distribute the weight onto the hips, the ideal load carrying surface on the body. The original ALICE pack only distributed the weight onto the shoulders and lower back — which was a real problem. Then we started talking about the science of load carriage. And that’s what MOLLE is all about. Getting the weight off the shoulders and onto the hips — a modular approach to the design of the rucksack.”

Members of the 82nd had even more specific requests. “One of the requirements that the 82nd had was that the harness that attaches the rucksack to the parachutist be sewn directly to the pack — because they didn’t want to lose any of the parts of it. This was the one requirement we didn’t agree with. We decided it would be better and more practical if the harness that supports the pack to the parachutists harness is removable but can be set up in a configuration that is seamless in how it attaches, and therefore, doesn’t require a long rigging process. Normally rigging a rucksack up to this type of harness can be a 5 min or longer process, depending on the Soldier. With this, it’s about a 1 min. process. But, it’s still completely removable when need be,” said Landry.

With a durable, yet light-weight frame, sewn-in pouches for organization of equipment, a pouch for airborne components (harness and lowering line), and MOLLE-webbing for attaching additional pouches, Landry believes the versatile MOLLE 4000 is both balanced and adaptable.

The MOLLE 4000 will begin fielding later this year. Around 6,000 packs are expected to be distributed to members of the 82nd Airborne Division. A large contingent of the conventional deployed force is also expected to receive a full-scale fielding of the rucksack in the near future.

By K. Houston Waters, US Army

ADS Ft Bragg Warfighter Expo – Step In Visor by Ops-Core

Friday, March 30th, 2018

img_8016.jpg

Ops-Core has refined their Step-In Visor which is designed to work specifically with the geometry of the FAST line of helmets. The visor works like goggles, but without an edge seal, providing eye protection. It also sits very close to the eyes so they can be used with night vision systems.

6EA90EFA-A2B2-47DA-8267-8B136E20FE0E

The new buckle allows the wearer to get the visor close in and tight. So much so that the Step-In Visor can be used in military free fall operations.

4E909038-5813-4D5E-B0FF-3C329A883E0F

The visor can be unbuckled from one side and stowed out of the way for donning and doffing or when otherwise not needed.

www.ops-core.com