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Archive for the ‘SOF’ Category

USSOCOM Awards Contract To Hardwire, LLC For Soft Armor

Monday, September 24th, 2018

Back in January of last year, the Unites States Special Operations Command released a requirement for soft body armor in support of the Special Operations Forces Personal Equipment Advanced Requirements (SPEAR) program.

For those of you who are fixated on price being the government’s number one factor for selection of a solution, this isn’t always the case. For this solicitation, they were intent on the best value with appropriate consideration given to the major factors listed in descending order of importance: Technical/Management, Past Performance, and Price. Technical/Management is significantly more important than Past Performance, which is significantly more important than Price.

Specifically, the Technical/Management Factor (Factor 1) is significantly more important than the Past Performance Factor (Factor 2), which is significantly more important than the Price Factor (Factor 3). With regard to Factor 1, Subfactor 1 is significantly more important than Subfactor 2 which is significantly more important than Subfactor 3 which is significantly more important than Subfactor 4:

Factor 1 –TECHNICAL / MANAGEMENT
Subfactor 1: Weight?Subfactor 2: Soft Armor Limited User Evaluation?Subfactor 3: Technical Approach and Independent Ballistic Test Data
Subfactor 4: Delivery Schedule and Production Capacity/Capability

Factor 2 – PAST PERFORMANCE

Factor 3 – PRICE

They cancelled this initial solicitation at the end of April of this year because none of the offerors could meet the spec, which remains classified.

The solicitation was re-released in July of this year and an award was announced on September 20th to Hardwire, LLC of Pocomoke City MD. The award is a five-year, IDIQ, Firm Fixed Price contract for a minimum of $100,000.00 and a ceiling of $8,000,000.00.

USSOCOM Awards L3 $48 Million Contract For Squad Aiming Lasers

Sunday, September 23rd, 2018

It’s the end of the fiscal year and Special Operations Command is wrapping up several of their requirements such as the Squad Aiming Laser. The Department of Defense made this announcement, late last week to L3 for the Squad Aiming Laser, who offers the Next-Generation Aiming Laser.

L3 Technologies Inc., Londonberry, New Hampshire, is awarded a $48,500,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for the production of Squad Aiming Lasers (SAL), spare parts, and training in support of U.S. Special Operations Command. The SAL is a compact, ruggedized, aiming, pointing and illuminating laser system for compact rifles and assault rifles. This contract includes options which, if exercised, would bring the performance period to ten years. Work will be performed in Londonberry, New Hampshire, and is expected to be completed by September 2023. If options are exercised, work will continue through September 2028. Fiscal 2018 Defense-wide procurement funding in the amount of $8,668,680 will be obligated at time of award and will not expire at the end of the current fiscal year. This contract was competitively procured via the Federal Business Opportunities website, with five offers received. The Naval Surface Warfare Center, Crane Division, Crane, Indiana, is the contracting activity (N00164-18-D-JQ27).

Below is a USSOCOM quad chart, summarizing the Squad Aiming Laser requirement.

Show Me A Leader

Saturday, September 22nd, 2018

AFSOC showing what it’s all about.

Live Fire – USSOCOM Suppressed Upper Receiver Group (SURG)

Thursday, September 20th, 2018

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I recently had the opportunity to fire the newly selected USSOCOM Suppressed Upper Receiver Group (SURG), built by SIG SAUER. It’s based on an MCX upper receiver group and is designed specifically to work with the suppressor attached. The suppressor is considered integral to the design. However, the direct thread suppressor is removable by the operator, for cleaning and maintenance. The weapon is also capable of firing without the suppressor, however there is no muzzle device. In that case, there is a gas selector, which will most often be used to deal with ammunition issues.

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For the units receiving SURG, they’ll mate it to their issue M4A1 carbine lowers, giving them access to the MCX piston driven upper.

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Here’s a video of me firing SURG in fully automatic mode. The upper is paired with a SIG full-auto M400 lower receiver due to availability at SIG Academy. You’ll also notice the adapter knuckle which allows the MCX upper to fit on an AR lower. Don’t take anything away from my smiling demeanor, I always look like that. And yes, it is front heavy; every firearm equipped with a suppressor shares this trait.

Although it’s not the intent, even after several magazines, the suppressor shroud could still be touched with the barehand. All the same, I don’t recommend you do this at home. Lots of variables are going to influence how hot the barrel, suppressor and shroud become and how quickly.

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Instead, what this does demonstrate is that the shroud will mitigate injury and damage to equipment caused by a hot suppressor. It’s success is a combination of design and materials. There’s plenty of room for the heat to dissipate, and the Aramid cord wrap resists melting or sticking to other surfaces.

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Due to SOCOM concerns, SIG is still being tight lipped about performance data, but it had to meet some very stringent selection criteria, which I went over when the upper was selected in August.

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Once the SOCOM contract is fulfilled, SIG plans to offer SURG for commercial sale. However, don’t expect it to come cheap.

AFSOC Seeks Information On Personalized Tourniquet Systems Blood Flow Restrictor

Friday, September 14th, 2018

Hurburt Field’s 1st Special Operations Contracting Squadron has issued a Sources Sought Notice, for Market Research purposes only, for potential sources of developing and/or providing equipment similar to the Owens Recovery Science personalized Tourniquet System or an equivalent product.

The equivalent product must be able to control/restrict blood flow to limb for rehabilitation of damaged/weak muscle tissue, include timer controls to automatically maintain pressure or deflate when time has expired, safety alarms to warn of cuff over and under pressurization, and must measure occlusion in mmHg (standard blood pressure measurement: systolic/diastolic pressure).

For full details, visit www.fbo.gov.

SOFWERX Forming SOF/Service/OGA Council for Innovation and Agile Acquisitions

Monday, September 10th, 2018

SSD readers are innovators and a quite a few of you currently serve in a variety of roles. SOFWERX is looking for innovators and is forming a council at their facility in Tampa, Florida, consisting of SOF, Military Service and OGA representatives.

The purpose is to increase and accelerate capabilities to the warfighter using agile acquisition processes and the SOFWERX platform:
• Cross leveraging networks & expertise to find best of breed and buy down risk
• Creating non-traditional technology opportunities
• Generating efficiencies through leveraged funding
• Applying flexible business methodologies
• Advancing cross cutting, high yield capabilities

For additional information visit www.sofwerx.org/council.

SOFWERX – Illicit Finance Group

Thursday, August 23rd, 2018

One of the most effective tools to counter transnational threats is the ability to identify and interrupt their financial networks.

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Illicit Finance (IF) is at the forefront of the international agenda. Governments, academia, and the financial services industry worldwide are joining forces to combat fraud, money laundering, tax evasion, cryptocurrency, international bribery, and human trafficking.

On Wednesday, 3 October, from 11:00 AM-1:30 PM, SOFWERX will host an Illicit Finance meeting where representatives from the Department of Defense, law enforcement, institutions of higher education, and the financial services industry come to share information and discuss joint-collaboration efforts at hand.

Those interested in participating should visit www.sofwerx.org/illicitfinance.

USSOCOM Solicits Technology for Hyper-Enabled Operator and SUAS Experimentation Candidates

Monday, August 20th, 2018

The United States Special Operations Command regularly hosts experiments intended to allow industry and academia to interact with operational personnel to identify technologies to enhance SOF capabilities.

This RFI is for TE 9-1:

Date: 5 through 9 November 2018

Themes: Hyper-Enabled Operator and SUAS

Location: Avon Park Air Force Range, FL

Experimentation Focus: The primary intent of this event is to highlight technologies that support USSOCOM’s Hyper-Enabled Operator concept and SUAS.

Technology areas to explore during the event include the following:
1 Information Edge. Ability to process data from wide array of sensor networks, communications channels, or partnered forces into information that is decision quality information.
1.1 Edge computing. Ability to derive useful information at the point of collection through sensor fusion and forwards processing without reliance on high- bandwidth, long haul communications.
1.2 Information visualization. Tailored information visualization that provides the right information, to the right element, at the right time. Includes tailored Heads Up Display (HUD), audio, haptic feedback, and predictive information management to identify and present relevant information during each phase of an operation.
1.3 Data transport with reduced vulnerability to intercept and detection, including optical and non-RF solutions.
1.4 Cross domain data access. Systems to securely run advanced data analytics across data sets on different domains.

2 Next generation Intelligence, Surveillance, Reconnaissance (ISR). Technologies of interest include the ability to:
2.1 Find, fix, finish, exploit and analyze.
2.2 Without owning the air domain.
2.3 Includes the space and/or cyber domains.
2.3.1 Exploit the cyber domain and digital patterns of life on social media to support ISR missions.
2.3.2 Includes high-altitude persistent solutions between traditional air and space.
2.3.3 Exploit the space domain to “fix and finish,” to include on-demand payloads.
2.4 Ability to exchange data with distant sensors to perform Time Difference of Arrival/Frequency Difference of Arrival geolocation.
2.5 Enabled by advanced automation advanced standoff multi-modal
biometrics, real-time sensor fusion, action detection, and “smart systems” that tailor collection focus and fidelity based on requirements.
2.6 Small, low power autonomously emplaced ground sensors capable of meshed operation and long-dwell. Tailorable sensors including electro optical, infrared, Hyper Spectral Imaging (HSI), LIDAR, electronic warfare, and others capable of contributing to biometric analysis from 200-1000 meters.
2.7 Precise time and position correlation to full motion video.
2.8 In modular payloads that permits installation across full range of SUAS in the next section.
2.9 Leveraging Human Language Technologies (HLT) to:
2.9.1 Reduce operator workload.
2.9.2 Reduce communications bandwidth requirements.
2.9.3 Increase probability of detecting specific speakers.
2.9.4 Increase effectiveness of unfamiliar languages.

3 Small Unmanned Aerial Systems.
3.1 Expeditionary ISR. Family of group 1-2 UAS’s, featuring modular
payloads, open architecture, small footprint and minimum logistics support. 4.3.1.1 Line of Sight (LOS) and beyond LOS data link.
3.1.2 Accurately locate targets.
3.1.3 Runway independent launch and recovery.
3.1.4 Two sensor capable, (e.g. high definition full motion video, electro optic/ infrared, electronic warfare, signals intelligence, HSI, LIDAR).
3.1.5 Autonomous operation, including meshed swarm capabilities.
3.1.6 Alternative power through environment (power lines, renewable, etc.).
3.2 Unmanned aerial blood delivery system. System must be vertical takeoff and landing capable (VTOL) or runway independent. USSOCOM will provide a blood surrogate for the event.
3.2.1 Systems should be capable of transporting a minimum of 10 pounds of blood.
3.2.2 The cold chain must be maintained and monitored throughout flight. Blood must be kept at 2-8 degrees Celsius from time of loading, transit, delivery, and unloading. Systems using passive cooling are preferred.
3.2.3 Consideration must be taken to minimize shock to blood payload for any proposed delivery concept.
3.2.4 System must have an operational range of 100 or more miles. Command and control of the aircraft must be maintained at all times.
3.3 Nano VTOL UAS
3.3.1 Extremely small, lightweight Nano VTOL UAS with a takeoff weight of 75 grams or below are desired with the following characteristics. 4.3.3.2 Day and night imaging capability.
3.3.3 Autonomous flight modes.
3.3.4 Indoor flight capability with augmented collision avoidance,
operator in the loop control.
3.4 Micro VTOL UAS
3.4.1 Small, lightweight micro VTOL UAS with a takeoff weight of 750
grams or below are desired with the following characteristics. 4.3.4.2 Day and night imaging capability.
3.4.3 All-weather capability.
3.4.4 Autonomous flight modes.
3.4.5 Autonomous indoor flight capability with collision avoidance. 4.3.4.6 Operation in Global Positioning System (GPS) denied environment and confined spaces (including subterranean).
3.5 Small Fixed Wing UAS
3.5.1 Hand launchable or VTOL fixed wing UAS with no launch or
recovery equipment (bungee, net, etc.) is desired with the following characteristics.
3.5.2 VTOL configurations not to exceed 3.5 kg takeoff weight. 4.3.5.3 All-weather capability.
3.5.4 Day and night imaging capability.
3.5.5 Autonomous flight modes with GPS denied capability. 4.3.5.6 Minimum of 90 minutes endurance at sea level.

4 Managed signature. Technologies of interest are those that help avoid physical detection by acoustic, thermal, radar, visual, optical, electro-magnetic, virtual, and near infrared means.
4.1 Technologies which help manage digital presence within the realm of social media.
4.2 Technologies that assist in providing resistance to biometric tracking.
4.3 Technologies that exploit publicly available information to obscure or deceive to deny information about actions and intentions.

5 Next generation Military Information Support Operations (MISO). Technologies should be operable in limited or denied connectivity environments.
5.1 UAS/drone supported broadcasts.
5.2 Linguist expertise and regional dialects.
5.3 Demographic and culturally adaptive.
5.4 Operable in multiple spectrums, e.g. microwave, IR, etc. 4.5.5 Real time feedback.
5.5.1 Biometrics and patterns of life. 4.5.5.2 Data analysis.

6 Human Performance and Biomedical. The optimization of SOF operator’s ability to perform at very high levels for long durations, process information and make the right decisions in a timely manner, while operating in extreme environments, under high levels of stress will significantly improve their operational effectiveness. SOF requires the capability for far-forward austere casualty care to sustain critically injured personnel until they can reach the next higher level of care. SOF medical personnel place a premium on medical technologies that are small, lightweight, ruggedized, modular, multi-use, and designed for operation in extreme environments. The equipment must be easy to use, require minimum maintenance, and have low power consumption. Drugs and biologics should not require refrigeration or other special handling.
6.1 Enhanced cognitive performance

The deadline for nomination package(s) is 10 September, 2018 at 12:00 Noon Eastern Time.

Future experiments include:

TE 9-2 Sensitive Site Exploitation/Hyper Enabled Operator, 25-29 March, 2019, at the Muscatatuck Urban Training Center, IN.

For full details, visit www.fbo.gov.