TYR Tactical

Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

Canebrake Zeroing Tool

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

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Designed for achieving a battlesight zero on a .223/5.56mm AR pattern rifle with standard height sights at 25 meters, this tool features calibrated offsets for 100, 200, or 300 meters and can be used with any style of target. This tool was designed for military and law enforcement applications where zeroing is often conducted at reduced ranges and obviously is useful for sport shooters as well.

Get yours at Amazon.con

CTOMS – Escape From Restraints Course

Monday, November 20th, 2017

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www.ctoms.ca

Greyhive Training Brief, Episodes 2 and 3

Saturday, November 18th, 2017

The Training Brief is a weekly video series released every Wednesday on the Greyhive website and YouTube channel. The episodes feature various Greyhive Experts and SMEs who cover a broad spectrum of topics ranging from mental performance to specific shooting and tactics elements. Each episode is 5 to 8 minutes and contains narrowly focused content.

The goal of the Training Brief videos is to deliver knowledge to our community that is relevant, actionable and cerebral.

Episodes 2 and 3: Mental Performance

Dr. Seth Haselhuhn, SOCOM Mental Performance Coach, discusses training and the mental performance aspects that determine each shooter’s success with Drew Estell of BAER Solutions. This is a multi-part series that covers many topics within mental performance and the psychology of successful shooters.

Seth Haselhuhn, Ph.D.
Doc has been working with SOF units for several years and has been instrumental in improving the shooting, decision-making, training, and overall performance of soldiers on and off the battlefield.

Drew Estell
SOF Veteran specializing in training shooters in rifle and pistol by giving the why and how, not just leading students through drills. Individual shooters, individual solutions.

To access all Training Brief videos and additional free articles, go to Greyhive.

Greyhive Training Brief, Episode 1

Saturday, November 4th, 2017

The Training Brief is a weekly video series released every Wednesday on the Greyhive website and YouTube channel. The episodes feature various Greyhive Experts and SMEs who cover a broad spectrum of topics ranging from mental performance to specific shooting and tactics elements. Each episode is 5 to 8 minutes and contains narrowly focused content.

The goal of the Training Brief videos is to deliver knowledge to our community that is relevant, actionable and cerebral.

Episode 1 – Spalling
Garett Schwindel of Kägwerks explains the effects of spalling and use of cover examples with Drew Estell of BAER Solutions.

To access additional training articles and content, go to Greyhive.

Whiskey 5 – Greyhive

Saturday, October 28th, 2017

Who

Greyhive is a media company founded by a Special Operations veteran and a former law enforcement officer. Greyhive’s web application, greyhive.com, is the premier online destination for civilians, first responders and military personnel to access trusted firearms and tactics training content.

Greyhive is a cooperative enterprise built upon a community of like-minded professionals Greyhive calls its “Experts”. All Experts are vetted by their peers, are highly regarded in their specified fields of expertise and have chosen to join the Greyhive community where they create, consolidate and deliver free training videos and articles. They possess decades of experience (active, retired and former military and law enforcement, competitive shooting, strength and conditioning, sports psychology, combatives, survival), but perhaps more importantly, Greyhive Experts possess a common passion: To lead, teach, influence and engage with individuals committed to their own professional and personal development.

What

Greyhive is a community where civilians, public safety professionals and military personnel go to access vetted, trusted and relevant online tactical and firearms training content. Greyhive.com consolidates industry-leading instructors, subject matter experts and training companies and delivers free articles and videos created by its “Experts”. The featured free content is Greyhive’s ‘Training Brief’ video series. The Training Brief series covers a broad spectrum of topics, but each video segment is delivered in a concise and narrowly focused format.

Greyhive is built to strengthen the bond of the men and women who invest their time, money, and hard work into their training. Whether you’re a responsibly armed citizen, law enforcement, or military personnel, Greyhive provides the knowledge that fuels the professional growth and development needed to accomplish your mission and meet your intent. Greyhive is a resource for like-minded individuals committed to defending themselves, their families, their communities and their country.

Where

Greyhive is based in Nashville, TN.

When

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Greyhive was founded in December 2016 and launched greyhive.com in October 2017. The first segment of the Training Brief video series will be released in November and Greyhive will begin delivering premium, subscription-based training content through its proprietary Team Room Platform in early 2018.

Why

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Greyhive has identified two significant gaps in the current firearms and tactical training continuum:

(1) There are no community-based sustainment or follow-on training solutions available to support professional, 1-to-1 online interaction between instructors and students;

(2) Instructors possess valuable subject matter expertise and highly sought-after training assets, but have no efficient way to control the dissemination of these assets online.

Follow-On Training. Students invest in attending training classes delivered by their instructors of choice. After the class ends, they have no way to continue training with the guidance and feedback from their instructors. This makes it difficult for the students to continue honing their skills and growing professionally. Without Greyhive, options for student-to-instructor interaction are too broad, too spread out, and not personal enough to get any meaningful feedback that is value added to their development. Students, as well as instructors, need a means of providing feedback, a professional community that encourages interaction and development, and a way to gain diagnostic feedback between attending classes.

Because training doesn’t end when you walk off the range.

www.greyhive.com

Arc’teryx Selects Grand Tetons For Location Of New Backcountry Ski & Snowboard Academy in 2018

Friday, October 27th, 2017

North Vancouver, BC (October 25, 2017) – ARCTERYX expands mountain skills academies to include new Backcountry Ski + Snowboard Academy in the Grand Tetons in February 2018.

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ARC’TERYX, the technical leader in outdoor performance apparel and equipment, is proud to announce it has expanded its collection of educational mountain-skills symposiums to include the new ARC’TERYX Backcountry Ski & Snowboard Academy, scheduled to be held February 9- 11, 2018 in Jackson Hole, Wyoming.

Created to support mountain skills development, experience and self-sufficiency in the mountains, ARC’TERYX Academies aim to create a space where beginners and experts alike can gain valuable knowledge through professionally-guided clinics, educational seminars, and shared experiences in the ultimate alpine environment.

Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyoming with Exum Mountain Guides. Photo by David Stubbs

Grand Teton National Park near Jackson, Wyoming with Exum Mountain Guides.
Photo by David Stubbs

Hosted with the support of Exum Mountain Guides, the oldest guide service in North America, the upcoming ARC’TERYX Backcountry Academy will provide a weekend-long curriculum with specific focus on technical ski alpinism, efficient winter mobility, crevasse rescue/rope work, critical mountain skills and important backcountry safety for skiers and splitboarders.

“We’re really excited to add a new backcountry component to the growing ARC’TERYX Academy franchise. Backcountry skiing and snowboarding runs deep in our DNA and our commitment to it has played a large role in our design heritage.” said Justin Sweeny, North American Sports Marketing Manager. “We chose Jackson Hole and the Grand Teton Mountain Range for its steep technical terrain, deep snow, and its elevated skiing and snowboarding environment. Add to that our new partnership with Exum Mountain Guides and the choice became obvious to offer a weekend of backcountry clinics that will continue to drive our community as a collective group of skiers and riders to advance our mountain skills.”

The event expects to draw hundreds of backcountry skiers and splitboarders from across the globe to climb and ride legendary routes in Jackson Hole and Grand Teton National Park, while also providing attendees with extra-curricular activities to compliment the weekend.

“We’re thrilled to feature an incredibly strong lineup of backcountry ski and splitboard clinics, keynote speakers, live music, movie nights, photo contests, and even a mini trade fair for the inaugural ARC’TERYX Backcountry Academy,” Sweeny said. “Taking everything we’ve learned from producing the ARC’TERYX Alpine and Climbing Academies over the past decade, this is going to be an incredible experience with a great weekend of camaraderie, education and adventure in the Tetons.”

For more information on ARC’TERYX Backcountry Academy clinics, schedules and the entire event please visit – jacksonhole.arcteryxacademy.com.

US Army Evaluating Combat Readiness Test To Replace Current Physical Fitness Test

Tuesday, October 24th, 2017

The US Army Center for Initial Military Training is at Ft Leonard Wood this week in order to evaluate the proposed Army Combat Readiness Test. The evaluation includes Soldiers from the 1st Engineer, 3rd Chemical and 14th Military Police Brigades.

The goal is to replace the 40-year-old Army Physical Fitness Test, which is only 39% predictive of a Soldier’s ability to do his or her job, with the proposed ACRT, which is about 81% predictive.

According to a recent Army News story, the ACRT consists of six events:

T Pushup

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2LT Elizabeth Tarbox extends her arms after lowering herself to the ground during the T pushup event Oct. 17 while testing the Army Combat Readiness Test at Fort Leonard Wood. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Dawn M Arden (Leonard Wood))

A modification of the traditional pushup, where Soldiers lower themselves to the ground extending the arms into a “T” position before returning to the starting pushup position. This is repeated for the duration of two minutes.

250-meter sprint/drag/carry

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1SG Alan Forester walks backward, dragging a weighted sled during the 250-meter sprint/drag/carry event Oct. 17 while testing the Army Combat Readiness Test at Fort Leonard Wood. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Mike Curtis (Leonard Wood))

A Soldier begins in the down, or prone position, stands up and sprints 25 meters and back, followed by walking backwards while pulling a weighted sled to the line and back. Once back at the starting line, they grasp two 30-pound kettles, returning to the far line and back. After returning, this exercise requires them to sprint the 25 meters to the far line and back. This is a timed event.

Leg Tuck

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Soldiers from 1st Engineer Brigade complete the leg tuck event Oct. 17 while testing the Army Combat Readiness Test at Fort Leonard Wood. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Dawn M Arden (Leonard Wood))

Soldiers must grasp the bar with an alternating neutral grip in the dead hang position before flexing with elbows, hips and waist to bring knees up, touching both elbows, before returning to the dead hang position and repeat as many times as possible.

Standing Power Throw

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1SG Brad Reigel prepares to throw a 10-pound medicine ball for the standing power throw event Oct. 17 while testing the Army Combat Readiness Test at Fort Leonard Wood. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Mike Curtis (Leonard Wood))

Soldiers must face backwards holding a 10-pound medicine ball, lower it to touch the ground, rises up and throw the ball backwards over their head as far as possible. Soldiers are allowed a practice throw and two record attempts.

3-repetition Deadlift

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SGT Robert Winstead prepares to lift a trap bar during the 3-repetition deadlift event Oct. 17 while testing the Army Combat Readiness Test at Fort Leonard Wood. (Photo Credit: US Army photo by Mike Curtis (Leonard Wood))

Soldier steps inside a trap bar, feet shoulder width apart and bends at the knees and hips while reaching down to grasp the handles with arms fully extended; stands up and lifts the bar by extending hips and knees until becoming fully upright, pauses, returns bar to the floor while maintaining flat back and without leaning forward. This is repeated two more times for a total of three repetitions.

2-mile Run

Soldier runs a 2-mile running course that is solid with no more than a three percent uphill grade and no overall decline.

What’s next?
Over the years, the Army has looked at several new physucal fitness assessments, but so far, none have been implememted. Consequently, there is no word on when, or even if, the proposed ACRT might replace the APFT.

SERE meets SPEAR: Specialists Convene for Unique Combative Course

Sunday, October 22nd, 2017

DAVIS-MONTHAN AIR FORCE BASE, Ariz. —
Your transport aircraft has just crashed in a remote and hostile environment. You and only a handful of other troops have survived the crash. As you survey the surroundings, you notice a crowd of local inhabitants running toward the wreckage screaming wildly, with brows furrowed and fists clenched. The level of fear inside you begins to skyrocket. You’re now scanning the crowd for its weakest links, trying to formulate a progressive strategy with the little time you have before they make contact. Which combative system are you most confident to employ in order to save your own life?

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(USAF photo by Senior Airman Chris Drzazgowski)

Self-defense is a major component of support provided by Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape specialists to troops who have a high risk of isolation in theater, such as downed-pilots and operators.

Late last month, SERE specialists across the 23d Wing, along with Pararescuemen from the 68th Formal Training Unit convened at Davis-Monthan Air Force Base, Ariz., to attend a one-week personal defense course led by a special guest.

“The intent of this week’s instruction was to give these Air Force SERE specialists the qualifications required to teach the SPEAR System as subject matter experts,” said Tony Blauer, founder of Blauer Tactical Systems Inc., and SPEAR coach. “We augmented the system and customized it with specific capture avoidance and SERE-type nuances — specific scenarios you wouldn’t see in a regular fight.”

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Tony Blauer, founder of Blauer Tactical Systems Inc., and SPEAR coach, instructed SERE specialists and other Guardian Angel counterparts in order to qualify them to teach the SPEAR System to personnel across the Air Force. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Chris Drzazgowski)

The Spontaneous Protection Enabling Accelerated Response System takes advantage of the human body’s startle/flinch mechanism to convert an aggressor’s attack into a tactical counter measure, according to Blauer.

“We weaponize the flinch,” Blauer said. “By combing the old brain’s most important function, to survive, with the new brain’s intelligence, to think and decide, we have reawakened a non-perishable personal defense system that can make every human being safer.”

To implement a strong foundation of Blauer’s system into future SERE training, a collaborative effort was necessary among the SERE specialists to maintain and distribute a uniform understanding of SPEAR.

“In the 23d Wing, we’ve got Nellis, D-M and Moody,” said Tech. Sgt. Nick, SERE specialist. “All the C-130 and HH-60 guys, and all the PJs within the 23d Wing — we all see the same people, so we’re all getting together to share the same information across the wing.”

Currently, Modern Army and Special Operations Combatives Programs are administered by SERE specialists.

“There are so many different combative programs in the military already,” Sergeant Nick said. “I did a lot of research and looked at what we were already teaching. In order to make this continuation training, I needed a system out there that builds upon what we already have. I saw his system and it directly translated into what we teach.”

The practical application and versatility of the SPEAR System has gained much popularity among police, first-responders, and the military. Blauer has spent three decades researching real violence and has reverse-engineered a system of close quarters entirely based on how fear and danger can afflict tactical performance.

“We teach them how people move,” Blauer said. “Everything from the extreme close quarter is built on a premise determining that the bad guy controls the fight, the location, the level of violence and the duration of the fight, so I need to figure out how to beat him. This is a new paradigm in strategic thinking. It’s brain-based and allows the defender to be much more responsive.”

When the specialists weren’t executing drills on the mats, they were engaged in analytical classroom discussions.

“Those real fights are completely different challenges, emotionally and psychologically, the duress is different, and then the movement patterns of the attacks are different,” Blauer said. “What we do is we use body cam, helmet cam, dashboard video and closed circuit TV to study how real violence looks and moves. As valuable as martial arts are, the real fight is different. Our approach is to study the enemy and move from there.”

Upon the training’s conclusion, SERE specialists and other Guardian Angel counterparts are now able to tailor a specific program for their customers across the Air Force.

“The most important lesson from this week is the realization that we’re all human weapon systems,” Blauer said. “Everybody knows how to fight, they just don’t know they know how to fight. Realize you don’t need a martial art belt, you don’t need a level, you don’t need to win tournaments, you need to have the ‘I don’t want to die, I’m gonna fight’ mentality.”

Just before Blauer departed Davis-Monthan AFB, the course attendees presented him with a gift signifying their gratitude for a week of exclusive and in-depth instruction.

“I really appreciated Tony Blauer coming out here himself,” Sergeant Nick said. “He’s the CEO of his company and he could have sent another trainer to come out here and train us — but the level of instruction, professionalism and customer service he provided was phenomenal — I consider Tony a friend now.”

Senior Airman Chris Drzazgowski, 355th Fighter Wing Public Affairs