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Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

Answers to Top Questions about Army Combat Fitness Test Equipment Fielding

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

WASHINGTON — As Army Soldiers start preparing for the new Army Combat Fitness Test, behind the scenes Army logisticians are also preparing to distribute more than 36,000 equipment sets to conduct the new test.

At a recent Facebook Live event, watched by more than 150,000 viewers, Sergeant Major of the Army Michael Grinston encouraged all Soldiers across each component to begin training now. The Army released a training guide with exercises from the Field Manual to help Soldiers successfully prepare with or without the equipment (training guide: www.army.mil/e2/downloads/rv7/acft/acft_training_guide_final).

Equipment will begin arriving to Active Duty, Reserve, and National Guard units in January 2020, with issue of the equipment complete by May 2020 — at least five months before the test is slated to become the Army’s official physical evaluation.

During the Facebook Live event, viewers posted more than 2,700 questions and comments — many concerning equipment. Here are answers to the top six questions that were posed related to fielding the ACFT equipment:

Q1. What pieces of equipment are required to conduct the new test?

A1: A complete set of ACFT equipment includes deadlift hex bars with weights and collars, nylon drag sleds with straps and plates (each weighted with two, 45-pound plates), one 10-pound medicine ball, and two 40-pound kettle bells. Units also will need a location to do leg tucks and a 2-mile run.

Q2. Who will get the equipment first?

A2: The Army has established a regional approach. The first units to receive AFCT equipment will be in the southeast region of the United States. This will be followed by units in the Southwest, OCONUS, Northeast, Midwest, and Northwest.

Q3. Will Reserve and Guard units, or Active units in remote locations, have to wait longer for their equipment?

A3: No. Distribution is based on geography, not by component. In fact, seven Reserve battalions, seven Guard units, one recruiting battalion, and one ROTC battalion were part of the initial 63-battalion pilot test to evaluate and solve logistical challenges involved with remote locations. The Army has several remote locations across all components to include more than 1,500 recruiting stations, overseas assignments, Reserve and Guard unit locations, fellowships and training assignments that take Soldiers far from normal military base support. Additionally, training programs and equipping strategies are being developed in close coordination with all components.

Q4. Who is responsible for fielding the equipment?

A4. The U.S. Army Tank-automotive and Armaments Command (TACOM) will serve as the lead to distribute equipment. U.S. Army Training and Doctrine Command (TRADOC), with the U.S. Army Center for Initial Military Training (USACIMT), have worked hard to develop the program. Army G-4 is providing policy and program guidance.

Q5. What resources will be provided until the equipment arrives?

A5. Soldiers do not need to wait for the equipment to start training to improve their flexibility, mobility, agility, and core strength. The Army released a training guide with exercises from the Field Manual to help Soldiers successfully prepare with or without the equipment (training guide: www.army.mil/e2/downloads/rv7/acft/acft_training_guide_final). The Army has also established Mobile Training Teams that will conduct site visits and provide training to units across the Army. In addition, the Army has produced training videos and online resources, which can be found at www.army.mil/ACFT.

Q6. Can a unit use equipment we previously purchased for training and testing?

A6. Units can use equipment they have on hand for training, but not for testing. Standardization is important, particularly on items like the sled, hex bar, and 10-pound medicine ball. For example, if the ball the unit has is bigger than the standard ball, it may be too large for Soldiers to grip and impact the test. Once the equipment is fielded, units will be able to order replacement parts through GCSS-Army.

By Ms. Ilene S Zeldin (G4)

Jeff Gonzales, Field Notes Ep 48: Active Shooter Considerations for Those Who Carry

Tuesday, October 15th, 2019

SureFire Field Notes is a multi-segment informational video series with tips and techniques from subject matter experts of all backgrounds. In this episode, Jeff Gonzalez discusses considerations for concealed carry holders during active shooter scenarios.

Jeff Gonzales heads Trident Concepts, LLC a reality based company specializing in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. Their motto is “Concepts that meet reality.”

He was a decorated and respected US Navy SEAL and has worked in a variety of environments and capacities through out the globe. He brings to the company not only his hard & soft skills, but also his ability to manage and exploit the staff to best serve the interests of the company and their clients. Their goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

He has also finished authoring the book Combative Fundamentals, An Unconventional Approach, now available for retail purchase. Presently, the book is keeping pace as a best seller and is considered by most to have set the high-water mark as an excellent resource. A must have for serious shooters across the board.

www.tridentconcepts.com

www.surefire.com

The Special Forces Qualification Course

Saturday, October 12th, 2019

Although it has been reengineered many times over the past 60 years, the Army’s Special Forces Qualification Course, four components have remained constant. Some form of selection, whether pre-phase, SFOT or SFAS along with individual tactical skills, MOS specific training and collective team training culminating in an FTX, commonly referred to as “Robin Sage”. This is the current version of the Q Course.

goarmysof.com

Max Talk 40: CQB: Methods of Entry: Diminishing Sectors

Monday, October 7th, 2019

This is the fortieth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

This is a segment from the Max Velocity Tactical CQBC (Close Quarter Battle Course). The three day class covers Tactical Clearance methods. This specific period of instruction concerns the number one man entering an open doorway via the Diminishing Sectors method of entry.

The CQBC class is a three day event, day 1 on the flat range conducting individual skills and entry drills, using live fire and frangible ammunition. The latter two days are force on target and force on force at the CQB complex.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical

SOF Horsemanship Course

Saturday, October 5th, 2019

Below, a 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne) NCO rides horseback while leading a mule through Humboldt Toiyabe National Forest during the SOF Horsemanship Course at Marine Corps Mountain Warfare Training Center.

The purpose of the horsemanship course is to teach SOF personnel the necessary skills to enable them to ride horses, load pack animals, and maintain animals for military applications in remote and dangerous environments.

Photos by USMC LCpl William Chockey

Max Talk 39: Patrol Immediate Action Drills (IAD): Break Contact – Front

Monday, September 30th, 2019

This is the thirty-ninth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

This video teaches, with the help of army men on a sand table model, Patrol Immediate Actions Drills (IAD) for Break Contact Front.

This is the fourth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical

SureFire Field Notes Ep 47: The Fundamentals of Gunfighting with Buck Doyle

Wednesday, September 25th, 2019

SureFire Field Notes is a multi-segment informational video series with tips and techniques from subject matter experts of all backgrounds. In this episode, Buck Doyle of Follow Through Consulting discusses his core tenants of gunfighting.

Buck Doyle served over 21 years in the US Marine Corps, including 17 years and multiple combat tours with Special Operations units. As a Reconnaissance Marine attached to 1st Force Recon, 1st Recon BN, and MARSOC units, Doyle served as Team Leader, Platoon Sergeant, and Chief Instructor at Special Missions Training Branch. He has current, extensive experience in hostile fire/combat zones in the Middle East, Africa, and Asia. Doyle retired from the Marine Corps a Master Sergeant with multiple awards, including the Bronze Star (with Valor).

In 2010, Buck founded Follow Through Consulting, LLC, and spent four years contracting with the Department of Defense as a member of the Joint Expeditionary Team (JET), advising and assisting combat units in Afghanistan. Follow Through expanded its training capabilities in 2014 to include law enforcement and qualified civilians in addition to military units and began consulting with corporate clients in the areas of leadership, team building, and product design/development & testing. More recently, Follow Through has added technical advising and training to cinema/television clients to its capabilities, with Buck providing intensive weapons training to lead cast members of USA Network’s “Shooter,” as well as serving as a technical advisor on the set of Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson’s summer blockbuster, Skyscraper.

www.followthroughconsulting.com

www.surefire.com

Max Talk 38: The ‘Assault Through’ (Dismounted Light Infantry Attack)

Monday, September 23rd, 2019

This is the thirty-eighth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

This video examines, with the help of army men on a sand table model, the concept of the ‘assault through’ as part of the dismounted light infantry attack. Including a thorough background and context on how and when to run the drill, it also gives variations on the standard U.S. Army doctrinal drill.

This is the fourth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan.

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical