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Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, June 18th, 2016

Bringing nothing to a gunfight

How much thought have you given to carrying personal protection tools other than a firearm? With the rampant increase in “gun free” zones are you still able to effectively and quickly protect yourself and loved ones.

Be prepared

Often times we get wrapped around the axle whether we can or cannot carry a gun. The subject of gun free zones is not relevant to this article, at some point we will all be in what I prefer to reference as “victim rich zones” or VRZ. The real question is what do you have available and have you trained for this contingency. I think it is foolish avoiding this subject, it is inevitable not to mention the consequences for breaking the law can be far more severe. While I recognize it is a personal choice, make sure you have weighed the options as well as consequences.

Think outside the box

In our Concealed Carry classes we talk about a threat matrix. This matrix is a breakdown of your perceived threat level as well as various loadouts. I ask all students to think long and hard into how you would effectively manage each of the blocks reminding them some blocks may not have any weapons at all. This exercise is incredibly helpful at addressing what to do when you must navigate a VRZ. The difficult part of many is recognizing the firearm free blocks. It sometimes is helpful to provide scenarios to this firearm free blocks such as going to the pool, boarding an airplane or visiting your children’s school. Even if you are permitted to carry in these locations now, recognize at some point you might not and better to acknowledge that notion now rather than later.

Create time and space

I find a firearm in the right hands to be incredibly effective at dealing with lethal threats. That should come as no surprise, but why is it effective? A major reason is it has the capability to launch multiple ballistic projectiles at varying distances. The key word is distances, in some cases you may not have access to your firearm even if it was permissible to carry so developing a layered defensive approach is sound. This approach can be scaled up or if necessary scaled down, but there is two more thoughts to consider here; metallic versus nonmetallic is one and whether you are subject to a physical search the other.

Plastic fantastic

Part of your threat matrix should include both metallic and nonmetallic weapons. If you cannot carry a firearm then you scale down to your next best options such as edged weapons, impact weapons, maybe chemical deterrents, stun guns and tasers should be considered. If you must navigate these VRZ’s frequently then suitable replacements must be explored and practiced with the same frequency as your firearms training. If you have to navigate these locations infrequently then scaling down is the better idea. On the nonmetallic side you may want to consider high impact plastic replacements for your normal array of edged and impact weapons. While these may lack some effectiveness as their metallic kin they will more than likely be adequate when you need them and can easily be replaced.

The black ops feel

If you must subject yourself to a physical search then stop and ask yourself is it really worth it for the simple reason your options are severely limited. However, there are still plenty to consider along with their covert method of carry and deployment. To me this is one of the most overlooked subjects within the concealed carry field. Carrying with no residual presence of any weapons. These types of options are available, but at a cost. Aside from the potential legal consequences the deeper the concealment the more difficult it will be to access; which puts even more emphasis on training.

Clothing attire, weapon selection and immediate actions to buy you time and distance to deploy your deep concealment options are becoming more and more relevant in our urban setting. This is were the art form of concealing really gets interesting.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

Saturday, March 12th, 2016

Cover, Concealment and Vehicles

It is important to have common definitions of common terms or further debate is senseless. Below are the definitions for cover and concealment taken from FM 21-75 COMBAT SKILLS OF THE SOLDIER:

COVER- Cover gives protection from bullets, fragments of exploding rounds, flame, nuclear effects, and biological and chemical agents.
CONCEALMENT-Concealment is anything that hides you from enemy observation. Concealment does not protect you from enemy fire”

Below are generally accepted definitions-

Obstacle- any item or thing that blocks one’s way or prevents or hinders progress
Terrain- the physical features of a tract of land
Vehicle- A device or structure for transporting persons or things; a conveyance
***From a tactical perspective this is only true when it is moving. If static, a vehicle is an Obstacle and can be either Cover or Concealment. ***

From RTC 350-1XX (Ranger Regimental Training Circular) at the unclassified level.
Close Quarters Battle (CQB)- As per 75th Ranger Regiment “Close Quarter Battle is a planned or well-rehearsed surgical small unit tactic, technique and procedure which encompasses the 4 principles of surprise, speed, violence of action and a fail-safe breech on a built up or enclosed structure.” This is separate and different from a vehicle ambush where the vehicle once stopped is dealt with tactically no differently than other terrain.

The concept of a vehicle as some special item is often misplaced. From a tactical perspective it is only a vehicle when it is moving. When static it is part of the terrain and may offer cover, concealment or just function as an obstacle. Overwhelmingly in engagements around vehicles the best option is to move from it. A non-armored vehicle affords different and inconsistent levels of ballistic protection based on the angles of engagement and the weapons system being employed against them. Since a vehicle sits off the ground, aside from upward or downward sloping terrain, high curbs or other manmade features on the threat side, they do not protect the feet and lower legs. Injuries to the lower extremities will cause what the military calls a “mobility kill”. Once mobility is lost the likelihood of success is slim without outside intervention. The experienced combatant i.e. military member, LEO or trained citizen for that matter must understand that a vehicle, except in the narrowest of circumstances does not afford cover as defined. There is no such thing as “pretty good cover” or “partial cover” there is “cover” or what I will call enhanced concealment which means you can hide behind it but it may or may not stop incoming fire reliably. If it cannot definitively stop bullets, then by definition it is not cover… that’s just a fact. With that established, anything between you and the threat is better than nothing, so I am not saying a vehicle can’t protect you in some ways. What I am saying is that a vehicle should not be viewed overwhelmingly as cover nor as some special item in the scope of tactical considerations. Another topic I hear talk about is the idea that glass can be cover in some instances. If we teach people to shoot out through glass at threats, then I think that neuters the argument right there. The concept of pillars being points of cover is patently false as well since one cannot claim that pillars though they may afford a level of enhanced ballistic protection will keep you from being shot. They are too narrow and are surrounded by either glass or open air if the windows are down or have been shot out. If you can’t hide your entire body behind it, then it’s not cover. Outside of luck and bad threat marksmanship, hiding behind a 3”-9” wide pillar for any length of time will likely leave you injured or dead in a combative engagement. For those that shoot pillars and say “see, it stopped x or y round” here is my 2 cents; bullets generally don’t come at you in ones and twos but by the magazine. There is not enough area covered by a pillar to make it worth loitering behind as though it is genuinely safer.

From the tactical perspective there are 6 principles I adhere to in open air engagements around vehicles. These should be common sense:

  • A vehicle is terrain unless it is moving, then it’s a vehicle again.
  • Fighting around vehicles is outdoor fighting and uses standard basic infantry tactical principles. THIS IS TRUE NO MATTER WHO SIGNS YOUR PAYCHECK, WHAT UNIFORM YOU WEAR OR WHERE YOU ARE i.e. RAMMADI IRAQ OR RICHMOND VIRGINIA. This is too often conflated with Close Quarters Battle (CQB) which is a more refined form of fighting “on a built up or enclosed structure”. It requires much more training, specialized equipment and detailed rehearsals when possible.
  • Anything is better than nothing but very little on a soft vehicle is cover.
  • Use every bit of ballistic protection that the vehicle may offer but don’t assume it is cover.
  • Keep the biggest chunk of metal you can between you and the threat as long as you can and be looking for the next best piece of terrain. As the threat moves you move keeping the vehicle as close to directly between you as makes tactical sense.
  • Move as soon as you can, move before you get pinned in a spot from which you can’t move.
  • That’s why the second of the first three steps of the SOF targeting methodology F3EAD is (Find) Fix and is followed by Finish. If you fix someone in place, then the finishing part is only a matter of time. If you were attacked in a certain spot more than likely it’s for the distinct advantage of the attacker. By moving and changing the angles you are disrupting the plan and can regain the initiative. If it is chance contact and you are losing the initiative, again the best course of action is to change the angles on the threat to regain it.
  • Don’t fight from the ground unless it is the last option you have. It is too easy to lose track of an adversary and across the hood or around a car it’s really just “who gets seen first gets shot first”. If an adversary rushes the vehicle you will not be able to counter his actions in a timely manner while trying to get up. Know how to do it but understand that fighting from the ground is a last resort.
  • A vehicle that is not in motion is terrain and should be treated as an obstacle with enhanced concealment that provides an unpredictable level of ballistic protection. The best course of action is to immediately return the best suppressive fire you can to blunt the attack and then move as soon as is tactically prudent to regroup and counter-attack or withdraw. Changing the angles changes their plan and changes the fight.

    – Mike Pannone

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    Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

    In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

    CTT Solutions

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

    Saturday, February 13th, 2016

    On use of the M4 selector:

    The principle to be adhered to is that you initiate the dismounting of the rifle by initiating movement of the thumb to the selector. By doing so you are beginning the largest least critical movement with the smallest and most critical movement so it does not get forgotten or more commonly, overlooked because something has drawn your attention and broken the mental continuity. From an instructional perspective, if I see a rifle brought out of the mount with a time gap of 1 second or more and then put on safe, I can nearly guarantee you that individual will forget to safe the rifle under pressure of time or threat. It must be a learned pattern of response (motor memory, procedural memory, automated neural control…whatever you want to call it except for muscle memory, please.)

    I safe my rifle on reloads because if I am so close that I need to immediately reengage and have a sidearm I will transition (the only time I don’t care if it is placed on safe or not), If I don’t have a sidearm I would be seeking cover not reloading in the open and then reemerging in a different spot. If I have distance, then I would be dropping behind cover and finding another position to reemerge from as well, so other than a transition I can put the rifle on safe without any real effect on my re-engagement speed. I use “the jumpmaster theory” of learning what “right” feels like. I put my rifle on safe every time it leaves the mount and I don’t even realize it but if I miss the selector it will jump out at me because it is wrong. Just like when I was a jumpmaster I didn’t even notice if I walked by a jumper with a properly rigged parachute but I could spot a misrouted static-line or twisted strap in my peripheral vision because the picture was wrong. I could also trace a strap and never see it but immediately know it is misrouted or twisted by feel.

    Again, I had patterned in the right feeling along with the right picture and it would immediately jump out at me if incorrect but be invisible when correct. I had patterned in the correct picture and feeling so when it was present it was seamless and when it was absent it was obvious. Even if I don’t take the time to place it on safe or miss the selector when I attempt to, I realize it is in the fire position and can act accordingly at the next opportunity. Learning is patterning behavior and I want to pattern my behavior in the proper manner every chance I get. In my opinion you are either learning a task in the best possible way or one of all the other ways; it’s up to you to figure out which is which.

    – Mike Pannone

    GFmomentpic

    Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

    In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

    CTT Solutions

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Daryl Holland

    Saturday, January 23rd, 2016

    Colt Combat Unit Pistol

    IMG_20160122_180639

    The Colt Combat Unit Pistol was designed by Ken Hackathorn and myself after the recent partnership between Colt and Alias Training & Security Services. I’m always honored to be mentioned in the same sentence with a living legend like Ken, so when I was asked to be a part of this with the Colt family it was an easy decision because I was also raised on the 1911 and the history of Colt dating back to 1836 speaks for itself. Colt has come out of Bankruptcy from the “Top Rope” with some changes in 2016 that aren’t just for the Military any more. This new Colt pistol is ready to go from the box to the holster without any modifications. It doesn’t just look great, it performs great. It has a dual recoil spring that will action the slide faster and softer, enabling the shooter to get their sites back on target faster after firing a round. It has 25 LPI (Lines per inch) checkering on the front and back strap/mainspring housing and the G10 grips don’t just look cool they also help maintain that perfect grip when you have sweaty hands.

    IMG_20160122_180707

    The rail for a gun light is much needed by our commandos who keep us safe at night when most of the bad stuff happens and the Novak sites have a tritium dot on the front site post. The upswept beaver tail extended grip safety and light weight hammers are common within custom 1911’s. The attention to details by the Colt custom shop is amazing because they have made the best solid aluminum trigger I have ever felt.

    Of course, I’m biased because of my new relationship with Colt, but just hold this gun in your hand and drop the hammer.

    Sold!

    The suggested retail price for this pistol is $1,499.00.

    With the Administration and shady Democrats taking shots at our 2nd Amendment, maybe you should get two.

    ”One for each of ya” -Doc Holiday

    Respectfully,

    Daryl Holland

    image1

    Daryl Holland is a retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major with over 20 years of active duty experience, 17 of those years in Special Operations. Five years with the 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) and 12 years in the 1st SFOD-Delta serving as an Assaulter, Sniper, Team Leader, and OTC Instructor.

    He has conducted several hundred combat missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Philippines, and the Mexican Border. He has conducted combat missions in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush Mountains as a Sniper and experienced Mountaineer to the streets of Baghdad as an Assault Team Leader.

    He has a strong instructor background started as an OTC instructor and since retiring training law abiding civilians, Law Enforcement, U.S. Military, and foreign U.S. allied Special Operations personnel from around the world.

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

    Saturday, January 2nd, 2016

    “A well-regulated Militia being necessary to the security of a free state …”

    2016 is here and if you are a lawful carrier of a concealed pistol I ask you to do yourself, those in your charge, and the country a favor. Think of it as one of your New Year’s resolutions for every year you plan to carry a gun. Below are the minimums but the point is that it is not a great expenditure in time or money considering how important the skills are.

    1. Seek training or sustain the training you have already sought. Going to a good shooting course is like taking a college class, if you don’t use it you won’t retain it. You can go to most Walmart stores right now and buy 9mm for about $10 a box so for 100 rounds “taxes, tags and dealer prep” I’m in it for about $25. I often see American made 9mm for under $9.98 and foreign for that or less at times on the internet as well. Now I have 100 rounds to practice so I would split that into two 50 round sessions like I have written of before on SSD:

    · Freestyle slow fire- 10 rounds

    · Strong hand only- 10 rounds

    · Support hand only- 10 rounds

    · Draw shot slide-lock reload shot 10 rounds

    · Draw shot-magazine-exchange shot 10 rounds

    (All shots are fired from the holster alternating the start position from hands at sides to surrender position and all ending with the pistol returned to the holster.40 draws (10 with transition to support hand), 50 precision shots (30 freestyle, 10 strong hand only 10 support hand only), 5 slide lock reloads, 5 magazine exchanges.)

    2. Make the time to practice. Not “find the time”, MAKE the time! What would those skills be worth to you in time and money if they were needed and not present? If you exercise the right then you are obligated to be responsible and proficient…otherwise leave it at home. I will run the above course of fire several times a week if I am working a rifle emphasis just to keep my skills current and it works. It usually takes well under 20 minutes. Another thing I do and it should be a must, like not leaving the house without your wallet and phone is my “Morning minute” this in truth might be more important than the range time but I see both as crucial.

    Noner’s Morning minute-ENSURE YOUR GUN IS CLEAR. DO NOT DO THIS WITH A LOADED GUN!-

    *Put your holster in the location you intend to carry and for one minute draw from that holster at a progressively faster rate. What you are doing is dry-firing the garment/holster location and trying to find a failure point i.e. some manner in which your current garment and holster location are not compatible and might cause you to have a bad draw. You can easily get 10 good draws in 1 minute and you are now ready to go out into the world with a properly donned gun and a proper mindset.

    All together I can go to the range twice a month for $25 and dedicate 40
    minutes of actual shooting time. Let’s say total prep time to and from range
    is 30 minutes. That puts me at 200 minutes a month and add in the 30 minutes
    of dry Morning minute draws and we are at 230 minutes a month or round it up
    to 240 or 4 hours of the 720 in a month. Put it all together and in the
    entire calendar year for $300 and 48 hours of my entire year . I did the
    following and all on a consistent basis which is crucial.
    * 1200 good quality training rounds fired
    o 720 freestyle
    o 240 strong hand only
    o 240 support hand only
    * 120 slide lock reloads
    * 120 magazine exchanges
    * 3600 dry draws (at only 10 per morning)
    * 480 draws live

    * There are 8766 hours in a year and 48 of them adds up to .5% of my
    year. So I still have 99.5% of my year left over to do all the other stuff.
    * $300 is the cost of five Grande Mocha’s at Starbucks a week on
    average or one decent sit-down lunch for one.
    * 1 minute out of every 24 hours is 1/1440th of you day. You spend as
    much time waiting on one long light by you house.

    THIS IS ONLY WHAT I WOULD CONSIDER THE MINIMUM BUT IT IS STILL VERY
    EFFECTIVE ON A LIMITED BUDGET.

    It doesn’t take a lot of money or a lot of time and it’s worth every penny, every minute and every bullet expended. Do the math and do yourself and all of us a favor. Times are tough and if San Bernardino and Paris are indicators, it will get a lot tougher. We need all able-bodied men and women on deck and ready for inclement weather. It’s not too much to ask in this, the greatest country the world has ever known.

    – Mike Pannone

    GFmomentpic

    Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

    In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

    CTT Solutions

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Daryl Holland

    Saturday, December 12th, 2015

    After the recent Domestic Terrorist attack in San Bernardino, our current administration believes that more gun control is the answer. These ignorant Democrats and Libtards have no clue when it comes to combating terrorism in the U.S. or abroad. Watching them water down our international prowess was laughable in the beginning, but it’s not funny to watch them dismantle everything we worked for in the Middle East just so Obama could say, “I ended the war in Iraq”. It’s not funny this administration could have sent a QRF to Benghazi, then covered up their lack of action. It’s not funny that they have been negotiating with Iran, the same country whose constitution mandates that all laws are based on the Koran. Women are considered un-equal to men under Iran’s legal code. It’s not considered “Radical” that women shouldn’t drive cars, can’t open a personal bank account or be allowed to go out in public without a male relative chaperone. Infidelity is grounds for stoning, homosexuals are hung and beheading is the penalty for leaving Islam. We don’t negotiate with terrorist, but it’s OK to negotiate with these savages?

    We are not at war with Islam, but elements within Islam are at war with us. Until we recognize that Islam is not a religion of peace, there will be another 9/11, more attacks like Paris and San Bernardino. Gun free countries and gun free zones that display signs of their weakness will continue to be the perfect target; “Ignorance is Bliss” and sheep will always be an easy target for wolves.

    Wake up America and vote out our weak leaders that want to disarm you and your ability to protect yourself. If they will not take the lead on combating evil how can you expect them to prevent evil from knocking on your doorstep?

    Respectfully,

    Daryl Holland

    image1

    Daryl Holland is a retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major with over 20 years of active duty experience, 17 of those years in Special Operations. Five years with the 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) and 12 years in the 1st SFOD-Delta serving as an Assaulter, Sniper, Team Leader, and OTC Instructor.

    He has conducted several hundred combat missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Philippines, and the Mexican Border. He has conducted combat missions in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush Mountains as a Sniper and experienced Mountaineer to the streets of Baghdad as an Assault Team Leader.

    He has a strong instructor background started as an OTC instructor and since retiring training law abiding civilians, Law Enforcement, U.S. Military, and foreign U.S. allied Special Operations personnel from around the world.

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

    Saturday, November 21st, 2015

    Entering A New Time

    We are entering a new time and we as good Americans need to act accordingly. The attack in Paris should have been the largest and most recent wake-up calls to the general populace that we are entering a new age with a different threat. This threat not only seeks to but is capable of projecting power in a different manner. It an ideology that says the price of admission and to get “credentialed” all one must do is lash out at the innocent who does not believe in their ideology.

    Talk with those in your charge about reactions if there is an attack and agree on it. What is our immediate plan? Who goes where and does what? These decisions will not be arrived at under the tremendous stresses of potential death or grievous bodily injury. Without planning it is just luck and as I have said countless times and is Noner Rule #1 “Good luck is for novices; bad luck is for everyone. Bank on skill, at least you control that.”

    In preparation I encourage those who understand the legal and moral ramifications and can legally carry a firearm to do so. Before taking on that responsibility, seek genuinely competent training. Make that CCW a life preserving tool and not an expensive good luck charm. Once that proficiency requirement has been met you have demonstrated your seriousness and should carry everywhere you are legally permitted.

    If you don’t already have it seek first-aid training and have medical supplies in your vehicle. This is just the right answer regardless of current threat levels.

    Finally, understand that the biggest threat you will face relative to ISIS related terrorism is the “lone wolf” attacker or what I more specifically call the “non-aligned sympathizer” (NAS). That term is exactly what the ideology commands and encourages due to the inability of any security apparatus to effectively monitor them. The reason this is important is that if you just avoid ball games and large populated public venues or the likely “soft targets” understand everyplace you go without a very obvious security presence is a soft target. The NAS can strike anywhere any time because he is only concerned with becoming a name of note in the “cause”. For that reason, we must remain what I call “professionally vigilant” or in layman’s terms acutely aware of our surroundings. Make sure you know what “right” looks like as far as behavior. If someone stands out don’t come unglued and immediately call 911 but look and listen. All over the multiple war zones we have been engaged in are sign’s in one place or another that say
    “Stay alert, Stay alive.”

    It has made the difference in many a soldier, sailor, Airman and Marines life….It will for you if you heed that simple and sage advice.

    “I’m waking up, I feel it in my bones
    Enough to make my systems blow
    Welcome to the new age,
    to the new age”

    Imagine Dragons, Radioactive

    – Mike Pannone

    GFmomentpic

    Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

    In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

    CTT Solutions

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Daryl Holland

    Saturday, November 7th, 2015

    As our personal security becomes compromised by cowards looking for gun free zones and other easy prey, why wouldn’t you want to exercise your 2nd amendment right and carry a weapon? I only ask that you be accountable with your marksmanship and know your own capability to not become part of the problem in an active shooter scenario. I know good people want to help during chaos, but you’re not helping if you can’t hit what you’re shooting at. I get it, because it takes the 1st responders several minutes to respond to a situation and if I had family in that situation, I wouldn’t wait either. If you don’t know the difference between cover and concealment, you might be behind on tactics to proceed without guidance.

    The 1st responders and other fools like myself that run to a gun fight have most likely had some training. Situational awareness and tactics were not taught during your conceal carry class and just shooting paper targets in the backyard won’t prepare you for the stress involved during a gun fight. Not only can you hit the target but can you hit the “X” ring consistently and under stress? Nothing prepares you like the real thing and even though your combat veteran may be cool during chaos…can he burn the “X” ring out?

    If you’re that person carrying a weapon without any training and find yourself in an active shooter situation, you should find a defendable location and let the assaulter come to you and then let him have it. I call it the “Joe Biden method”.

    I know teachers are carrying weapons in some of the schools around Texas, which is great. However, the right teacher should be carrying that has taken marksmanship courses and/or possess some tactical skills.

    Would you want an average shooter with minimal training slinging lead around your Precious Cargo (children)?

    Respectfully,

    Daryl Holland

      
    Daryl Holland is a retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major with over 20 years of active duty experience, 17 of those years in Special Operations. Five years with the 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) and 12 years in the 1st SFOD-Delta serving as an Assaulter, Sniper, Team Leader, and OTC Instructor.

    He has conducted several hundred combat missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Philippines, and the Mexican Border. He has conducted combat missions in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush Mountains as a Sniper and experienced Mountaineer to the streets of Baghdad as an Assault Team Leader.

    He has a strong instructor background started as an OTC instructor and since retiring training law abiding civilians, Law Enforcement, U.S. Military, and foreign U.S. allied Special Operations personnel from around the world.

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.