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Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzalez

Saturday, December 20th, 2014

Do you ever get that feeling someone is paying way too much attention to you. Did you ever think you may be drawing that attention because of some poor choices for your method and behavior while carrying concealed.

We run a boatload of students through our Concealed Carry Tactics class and one thing we always get them to do is a “peer review”. This is where they walk the line looking over each other’s method of carry. Some are better than others, but having someone give you a once over is worth it big time. There is a mutual benefit through the feedback, honest feedback. Then the other person becomes more familiar with common mistakes and what they look like for real.

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There are so many things people do that give away the fact they are carrying concealed, but the most obvious is when the gun actually is recognizable through the clothing. You really only see this one with poor selection in clothing options, mainly too tight or too light in nature. However, another method of printing is through what we call a “uniform”. While you may not actually be standing their in your dress blues, you fit the profile. Traveling overseas taught me a lot about this and in some parts of the world I absolutely did not want to be associated with my fellow Americans. Just about every single one of them looked like they stepped out of an REI catalogue. It was actually a bit funny when you stopped to look at it and while working on vulnerability studies it was something I would look for on the bad guy side, so it makes sense we do the same thing.

While we may not be walking around in little clusters of catalog models, I still see a lot of people making poor choices of clothing. So, while yes you want to conceal the weapon well, you also don’t want to draw attention to how you conceal the weapon. A year in the life.

- Jeff Gonzalez
Trident Concepts, LLC

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Frank Proctor

Saturday, November 22nd, 2014

Exercises vs Drills

In my classes one of the first thing I talk about is the fact that I use exercises during training and not drills. Here’s why. Most times when folks go to the range and shoot drills they do the same thing over and over again at the same pace and may or may not reach and end state that they want. For example a shooter goes out and does some Bill Drills from the holster. 50 times they draw the gun and shoot is 6 times in 2 seconds. They miss shots all the way to runs numbers 47-50. Does this mean they trained themselves to get a pistol out of the holster and get 6 hits in 2 seconds or that they trained themselves to fail for 46 attempts? I have done a whole lot of range sessions where I worked this sort of method and what I think I did was train myself to fail then eventually get it right. For example when I was training a lot for USPSA I would set up and run stages. I would bomb the stage a few times then start making magic happen. Guess what happened in matches? Most times I would bomb the first couple stages them settle down and do well. It’s hard to win against strong competition that way.

So here’s my exercise analogy. If you had a goal of benching 400 pounds would you walk into a gym,put 400 pounds on the bar and start doing 400 pound bench press drills? Not for long! My thoughts now are invest your training time, be very analytical about what’s happening when you shoot and identify then attack the things you need to work on to be the shooter you want to be.

-Frank Proctor

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Frank Proctor has served over 18 years in the military, the last 11 of those in US Army Special Forces. During his multiple combat tours in Afghanistan & Iraq he had the privilege to serve with and learn from many seasoned veteran Special Forces Operators so their combined years of knowledge and experience has helped him to become a better operator & instructor. While serving as an instructor at the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course he was drawn to competitive shooting. He has since earned the USPSA Grand Master ranking in the Limited Division and Master ranking in the IDPA Stock Service Pistol division. He learned a great deal from shooting in competition and this has helped him to become to become a better tactical shooter. Frank is one of the few individuals able to bring the experiences of U.S. Army Special Forces, Competitive Shooting, and veteran Instructor to every class.

All this experience combines to make Frank Proctor a well-rounded shooter and instructor capable of helping you to achieve your goal of becoming a better shooter.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

We guys are notorious for practicing what we are good at. It gives a warm and fuzzy. I’ve made mention of this in the past and have encouraged folks to include more strong hand training in their range time. It is an elusive way to bridge the gap and to sneak off of a plateau.

I have modified the National Match course of fire and have included it in my current curriculum. This is a great bang for the buck drill.

The course of fire is as follows; Use an IPSC target. Firing lines are at 50 yards and twenty five yards.

Course of fire is shot in three strings.

String one is slow fire five rounds from the 50 strong hand only

String two is timed fire from the 25 yard line. Five shots, from the holster, strong hand only in twenty seconds

String three is rapid fire from the 25 yard line. Five shots, from the holster, strong hand only in 10 seconds.

It is a 75 point course of fire.

The scoring system I use is to deduct one point for ‘C’ zone or head shots. Deduct two points for ‘D’ zone hits. Deduct five points for misses.

Way more forgiving than the National Match course of fire but works well for varied skill sets. Good use of fifteen rounds.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Larry Vickers

Saturday, November 8th, 2014

A classic American trait is we like to customize and modify our prized possessions. Everything from cars, bikes, guitars and of course guns. I would argue it is one of our strong points and goes hand in hand with our quest to make things ‘better’.

My only advice is to know why you are customizing your firearms specifically. If it’s to make it a better range ‘toy’, then that’s okay. Just understand that I see a lot of shooters who think they are customizing their self defense firearms to make them more useful for the assigned task, when in fact they are making them less usable. I see this in every class I teach.

Be careful and do your research before you modify a weapon that you stake your life on. The stakes are too high to do otherwise.

-Larry Vickers
Vickers Tactical Inc.
Host of TacTV

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Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical is a retired US Army 1st SFOD-Delta combat veteran with years of experience in the firearms industry as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. In recent years he has hosted tactical firearms related TV shows on the Sportsman Channel with the latest being TacTV of which Bravo Company is a presenting sponsor. Larry Vickers special operations background is one of the most unique in the industry today; he has been directly or indirectly involved in the some of the most significant special operations missions of the last quarter century. During Operation Just Cause he participated in Operation Acid Gambit – the rescue of Kurt Muse from Modelo Prison in Panama City, Panama. As a tactics and marksmanship instructor on active duty he helped train special operations personnel that later captured Saddam Hussein and eliminated his sons Uday and Qusay Hussein. In addition he was directly involved in the design and development of the HK416 for Tier One SOF use which was used by Naval Special Warfare personnel to kill Osama Bin Laden. Larry Vickers has developed various small arms accessories with the most notable being his signature sling manufactured by Blue Force Gear and Glock accessories made by Tangodown. In addition he has maintained strong relationships with premium companies within the tactical firearms industry such as BCM, Aimpoint, Black Hills Ammunition, Wilson Combat and Schmidt & Bender.

Larry Vickers travels the country conducting combat marksmanship classes for law abiding civilians, law enforcement and military and has partnered with Alias Training to coordinate classes to best meet the needs of the students attending the class.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer us some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

I recently started to re-incorporate ‘Calling Your Shot’ drills into my Basic Rifle Marksmanship (BRM) curriculum.

Knowing where the sites are when the hammer falls is not only good marksmanship training but a liability concern and a tactical necessity. We must know whether the shot is good or not, before the rounds impacts the target.

One should perform this drill at a distance where he cannot see the impact of the round register on the paper target. So,…50-100 yards.

One should also reduce the amount of stability in one’s shooting platform to increase his wobble area. There for, prone position is out. Use an alternate position like sitting, kneeling or standing.

Use a marksmanship data book or a simple notebook with your target drawn in it. Fire five rounds. After each round, annotate on your drawn target where you believe that round hit your target.

After the five round group, compare your note pad to your target. Your notes and target do not have to be an exact match. For example; if you called two high, two low and one left, and if your target’s feedback mirrors your notes, you have succeeded in this drill.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Daryl Holland

Saturday, October 18th, 2014

I was reading LAV’s Gunfighter Moment on Soldier Systems Daily the other day because I’m the new guy at Alias trying to keep up, and I realized that Larry & Mike see the same stuff I do… only ten times more.

I’d like to elaborate on a common term that echoes in this community, “outrunning your headlights”. This analogy is useful for a Special Forces Team training our Allies, as lesser trained foreign soldiers always want to jump into the advanced training. It’s called Foreign Internal Defense (FID) and a large part of the SF Mission around the world. Anyway, to prevent our foreign friends from going faster than they are ready, we always told them that advanced training is simply the basics done well. ‘Crawl, Walk & Then Run’, this is never more important than during marksmanship training.

Slow down and perform the perfect repetition to build perfect muscle memory. Speed will come naturally, and accuracy is a must before speed, or you’re just slinging lead on a range, much like when you go to hit golf balls at the driving range without ever receiving a golf lesson.

I still see Military & Law Enforcement spending their budgets on the latest and greatest equipment, but they only check the block with marksmanship training and tactics a couple times a year. If it’s your life, or bread and butter, then training should be first to alleviate bad outcomes and fill the gap with equipment shortages, as the training will recognize short falls. Owning the most expensive piano doesn’t make you Mozart.

As it was explained to me 20 years ago when I would follow Larry to IPSC matches with other unit shooters, “You learn to shoot the gun you have and as you outperform your starter gun, you replace pieces with tricked out/high end parts to shave a second here and there”.

With long gunners, I’ve seen 25 power scopes on a .308 Remington 700 style, when a fixed 10 power is plenty for that rifle system, and for finding targets more quickly at ranges between 100m-800m. If you can afford the glass for a Leapold x25 or Schmidt & Bender x28 scope, then you can afford a .338 Lapua Magnum and enjoy dropping that Mule Deer a mile away. Make your optic fit your gun.

Sometimes, I just don’t get the shooting industry. By the time Jethro has figured out, “It’s not as easy as it looks and could use a little help”, he has already developed bad habits and the reason why women are usually better marksmanship students…

Yep, I said it!

- Respectfully, Daryl Holland

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Daryl Holland is a retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major with over 20 years of active duty experience, 17 of those years in Special Operations. Five years with the 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) and 12 years in the 1st SFOD-Delta serving as an Assaulter, Sniper, Team Leader, and OTC Instructor.

He has conducted several hundred combat missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Philippines, and the Mexican Border. He has conducted combat missions in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush Mountains as a Sniper and experienced Mountaineer to the streets of Baghdad as an Assault Team Leader.

He has a strong instructor background started as an OTC instructor and since retiring training law abiding civilians, Law Enforcement, U.S. Military, and foreign U.S. allied Special Operations personnel from around the world.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Larry Vickers

Saturday, October 11th, 2014

I was on the phone the other day with Mike Pannone, a fellow Alias Instructor and former Delta Force Operator like myself. When the topic of shooting fast came up, Mike nailed it: “If you can’t shoot slow and straight then you have no business trying to shoot fast and straight.” Spot on.

Everyone wants to outrun their headlights these days and spray rounds all over the range in ‘Tacticool Ballistic Masturbation’ drills – that is way off base and unless your goal is to burn a bunch of ammo, and it’s also a complete waste of time.

Slow down and work on mastering the fundamentals – it ain’t sexy but it works. Period.

-Larry Vickers
Vickers Tactical Inc.
Host of TacTV

20130202-083903.jpg

Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical is a retired US Army 1st SFOD-Delta combat veteran with years of experience in the firearms industry as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. In recent years he has hosted tactical firearms related TV shows on the Sportsman Channel with the latest being TacTV of which Bravo Company is a presenting sponsor. Larry Vickers special operations background is one of the most unique in the industry today; he has been directly or indirectly involved in the some of the most significant special operations missions of the last quarter century. During Operation Just Cause he participated in Operation Acid Gambit – the rescue of Kurt Muse from Modelo Prison in Panama City, Panama. As a tactics and marksmanship instructor on active duty he helped train special operations personnel that later captured Saddam Hussein and eliminated his sons Uday and Qusay Hussein. In addition he was directly involved in the design and development of the HK416 for Tier One SOF use which was used by Naval Special Warfare personnel to kill Osama Bin Laden. Larry Vickers has developed various small arms accessories with the most notable being his signature sling manufactured by Blue Force Gear and Glock accessories made by Tangodown. In addition he has maintained strong relationships with premium companies within the tactical firearms industry such as BCM, Aimpoint, Black Hills Ammunition, Wilson Combat and Schmidt & Bender.

Larry Vickers travels the country conducting combat marksmanship classes for law abiding civilians, law enforcement and military and has partnered with Alias Training to coordinate classes to best meet the needs of the students attending the class.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

Saturday, October 4th, 2014

    Scan and Assess, Checking 6 and Other Gun-Foo Shenanigans

The following two definitions are crucial to an honest appreciation of this topic.

Webster’s-Merriam Dictionary

Look
Verb: to direct your eyes in a particular direction
See
Verb: to notice or become aware of (someone or something) by using your eyes
Aware
Adjective: knowing that something (such as a situation, condition, or problem) exists

I see far too often folks that conduct all kinds of movement and posturing after a non-scenario course of fire that is called “tactical awareness” but is probably more precisely called “gun-fu” or a “tactical kata”. Now don’t get me wrong, I am all about tactical awareness and keeping your “head on a swivel” but what I am not about is looking like you are doing something but you’re really not. My big three are
1.) scan and assess
2.) checking 6
3.) looking at an AR ejection port after every string of fire

Scan and assess and checking 6 are both billed as giving you critical information and done correctly they actually do. The problem is that in the conduct of both, people overwhelmingly “look” in a direction but don’t “see” anything. They look at this as a way to condition themselves under stress to be aware but what they are actually doing is the exact opposite. By “looking” and not “seeing” they are conditioning themselves to move their head left and right and not properly process anything they did look at. By not processing your surrounding with specificity you are conditioning yourself to make the requisite amount of motion and movement and falsely convince yourself that you are “aware” of your surroundings when actually you are overwhelmingly not.

In the case of looking at an ejection port every time a string of fire is complete even though there is no specific stimulus, in doing so you are convincing yourself you saw more than you actually did. I see it as wasted motion that gives very minimal and incomplete information unless a physical stimulus was perceived. My issue is two-fold: it can’t be done at night with any legitimate effect in any reasonable amount of time and if you look and actually have enough light to see the bolt in battery the only thing you genuinely know is the bolt is in battery…nothing more! If the bolt locked to the rear then you would have felt the energy transfer to the rear but not back forward and that stimulus would have told your body through repetition and subsequent learned patterns of response (muscle memory) to reload your rifle. The input on the rifle gives you feedback so if I am getting the right feedback (the gun is running) why spend time and awareness getting minimal or incomplete information? If you are going to look then do a quick press-check (which can be done day or night) but if you don’t, the only thing you genuinely know is the bolt is in battery. If the magazine was bad and didn’t lock back or feed another round then a press-check is the only way to positively identify the status of your rifle.

Scanning and assessing, checking your 6 and knowing the status of your rifle or any weapons system for that matter is not done through the physical repetition alone but through mental repetition in conjunction with physical cues. Different levels of experience allow some to be vigilant when vigilance is required but not on a drill where it is unnecessary. Less experienced people cannot differentiate between when it is a necessity and when it is not so that makes them feel compelled to do the dance every time they complete a drill. One’s ability to differentiate between the requirements of a situation speaks to how they train. Rote memorization of a “tactical dance” does not make you genuinely tactically aware. In reality it will make you less aware because you are conditioning yourself to physically act out the right answer but not get the benefit cognitively of the information it provides.

If you want to scan and assess or check your 6 after every course of fire and ACTUALLY SEE WHAT YOU ARE LOOKING AT then you are good to go in my book. If you press-check after every course of fire (and I do if there is any gap in time available along with pulling the magazine out and assessing by experience and weight if I think I am prepared for the next task) then I’m your advocate as well. Where I part ways with many is when the “gun-foo” starts and people are moving all around and looking all around and seeing almost nothing.

Looking is directing your vision…seeing is processing what you looked at. Don’t just look, see what’s there! Done properly you will genuinely be tactically aware…not just dancing around the firing line.

-Mike Pannone

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Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.


www.ctt-solutions.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

Saturday, September 13th, 2014

Shooting, Sights and Steel

Steel is an incredible tool for marksmanship training due to the instant feedback and (other than an occasional repainting) because it removes the requirement to go downrange and score or service (read “paste targets”). One problem I frequently see that leads to bad or sloppy habits is poorly chosen sizes of steel. I constantly see people at ranges or in videos shooting speed drills using steel that is very large, giving the shooter and viewer a deceiving appearance of skill and or speed. For example, if you do a one-shot draw at 10 yards on a B/C zone plate as opposed to an A-zone plate, there is a completely different level of precision and skill required.

I demonstrated this concept with a Glock that had no sights at all and performed 1-shot draws on a B/C-zone steel in 1 second or less from 10 yards with ease. This drill demonstrates the benefit of good body mechanics, proper presentation, and is actually very easy to perform. This drill emphasizes the point that at combative ranges, that body position is where the speed comes from: proper use of large steel. Now change the steel to an A-zone (60% smaller surface area), and it becomes far more problematic and really a function of luck for the same 1 second shot. The point being, if you want to get faster and more accurate, doesn’t shoot targets of a size that allow hits with little to no sight picture. Work your draws on an A-zone steel or smaller. I frequently do my reload drills on a 6” round steel to force me to follow that front sight 100% of the time or miss. The benefit is continuous reinforcement of the requirement to follow the sights to get the hits…come off the sight—come off the target. The gun will follow the eyes every time so keep the eyes where they should be! I recently did a drill called “Sight Tracker” that reinforces this very concept. You can’t make the hits if you don’t watch the sights.

Take a look at it here:

The takeaway is that everybody looks like a superhero shooting big steel. Often times the result is a reinforcement of sloppy habits and bad technique along with a false sense of the speed at which you can reliable shoot and hit. Use steel that GENUINELY makes you aim and forces you to see those sights every time you break a shot and then follow them to the next shot or next target.

If you choose steel that lets you get away with little or no sight picture, that is what you are practicing…if you use small steel that makes you follow the sights every shot and work for every hit, that is what you are practicing.

In conclusion, you should choose your steel wisely!

For reference here are some numbers all in square inches to help evaluate relative difficulty:

• 6” round- 28.27 sq. in.
• 8” round- 50.26 sq. in.
• 8” square- 64 sq. in.
• A-Zone- 66 sq. in.
• ¼ size IPSC- 110 sq. in.
• A/B/C-zones – 220 sq. in. (approximate)
• Full size IPSC 430 sq. in. (approximate)

- Mike Pannone

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Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.


www.ctt-solutions.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

Being able to perform focal shift is a skill we sometimes neglect to practice on the range. I call this being omni-cognizant. Learning to see things full spectrum while performing a focal shift is a necessary skill and easy to neglect as we get sucked into the flat range training mindset. We should train ourselves to train our eyes. At a minimum, to perform a focal shift from our sights to the fight and from the fight to reference points beyond the fight. A way to exercise our eyes is by using a Brock String (easy to find instructions on the web). This is easy to build and easy to use. A Brock string (named after Frederick W. Brock) is an instrument used in vision therapy. It consists of a white string of approximately 10 feet in length with three small wooden beads of different colors.

The Brock string is commonly employed during treatment of convergence insufficiency and other anomalies of binocular vision sometimes developed by those of us who work strictly one eye on the range. It is used to develop skills of convergence as well as to disrupt suppression of one of the eyes. It is worth the few dollars on wooden balls, spray paint and string.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.