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Final 2013 Open Enrollment Class For Kyle Defoor In December

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Kyle Defoor’s last class in 2013 is right around the corner near Naples, Florida at the Altair Training Solutions Facility.

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Kyle Defoor 2-Day Carbine – Dec 14-15, 2013 – Naples, Florida

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Kyle Defoor is a former Special Mission Unit combat decorated Navy SEAL and sniper who served in Afghanistan. Kyle teaches firearms and tactics to military and law enforcement personnel in the United States and worldwide. He also offers marksmanship related open enrollment classes to the public.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

Saturday, November 9th, 2013

Put the gun down!

Thursday after a detailed cleaning of my CZ P09 I was doing my final test fire and zero validation before a few weeks of upcoming training. I went to the range with only 50 rounds and after doing a few reloads I decided to do an all double-action walk-back on a ¼ size IPSC plate. I do it in 05 yard increments from10-55 yards. If I shoot it clean it takes 10 rounds. I had 11 rounds left in the box so I loaded 11 and figured I could probably get to 55. It was a good day and I shot clean out to 55. I had one round left…nothing else in my gun bag. Every fiber in my body said “shoot that last round” but my rational mind said “unload, show clear and put the gun down.” I had set a training objective and met it; I had done what I set out to do in the manner I had prescribed so I was done. The last memory I had for the training session was setting a goal and achieving it with a proper repetition at the max distance. Unloading that last round into my hand and tucking it into a completely empty ammo carrier was an impromptu “training discipline pop quiz”. It’s easy to put 30 or 40 rounds back in your bag for later but that one cartridge was harder than hell not to shoot. What if I had shot it and missed? Then I would have capped off a great string with a miss and that’s all I’d remember.

The mental game is 90+% of shooting and it’s all about concentration and discipline. Don’t over-train, plan your session and shoot your plan. Set a goal, do your best to achieve the goal in the prescribed time and manner with a specified number of rounds…and then when you meet the objective or the ammo limit (whichever comes first) … put the gun down! You’ll shoot less but get better.

- Mike Pannone

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Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

www.ctt-solutions.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Larry Vickers

Saturday, November 2nd, 2013

‘Never underestimate the value of a good zero on your weapon of choice. In many of the classes I teach I see poor shooting for a variety of reasons with one of them being the lack of a proper zero. Dial it in and check it often – you’ll be amazed at the results.’

-Larry Vickers
Vickers Tactical Inc.
Host of TacTV

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Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical in a retired US Army 1st SFOD-Delta combat veteran with years of experience in the firearms industry as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. In recent years he has hosted tactical firearms related TV shows on the Sportsman Channel with the latest being TacTV of which Bravo Company is a presenting sponsor.Larry Vickers special operations background is one of the most unique in the industry today; he has been directly or indirectly involved in the some of the most significant special operations missions of the last quarter century. During Operation Just Cause he participated in Operation Acid Gambit – the rescue of Kurt Muse from Modelo Prison in Panama City, Panama. As a tactics and marksmanship instructor on active duty he helped train special operations personnel that later captured Saddam Hussein and eliminated his sons Uday and Qusay Hussein. In addition he was directly involved in the design and development of the HK416 for Tier One SOF use which was used by Naval Special Warfare personnel to kill Osama Bin Laden. Larry Vickers has developed various small arms accessories with the most notable being his signature sling manufactured by Blue Force Gear and Glock accessories made by Tangodown. In addition he has maintained strong relationships with premium companies within the tactical firearms industry such as BCM, Aimpoint, Black Hills Ammunition, Wilson Combat and Schmidt & Bender.

Larry Vickers travels the country conducting combat marksmanship classes for law abiding civilians, law enforcement and military and has partnered with Alias Training to coordinate classes to best meet the needs of the students attending the class.

www.VickersTactical.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, October 26th, 2013

The king daddy of all marksmanship fundamentals is Trigger Control. I do not consider this debatable. Partially due to the fact that I cannot see my front sight anymore. It’s there and visible on target but all a blur. I’m still quite capable of knocking the X ring out at 25 though.

My teaching of trigger control differs from many other of my fellow credible instructors who I respect.

When I transitioned from 1911 to Glock 19 (For administrative reasons) about a decade ago, I would push my group to my non-firing side. Frustrated, I called a friend at the AMU and asked his advice. He told me that he puts so much finger on the trigger that when complete with his trigger squeeze, he can drop his magazine with his trigger finger. This became my magic elixir. Since sinking my finger, I’ve straightened out my group. I teach this as well with some push back mind you.

In my opinion, splitting the distal phalange, or finger tip, is an anachronism. When using this method, the trigger finger is essentially a fulcrum where sinking the finger becomes a vice. The vice pulls evenly while the fulcrum speeds up at the end of the squeeze. I’m not suggesting that I am right and that this is law. I will add though, that if you do what you’ve always done, you’ll get what you’ve always gotten.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

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Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting).

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Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Frank Proctor

Saturday, October 19th, 2013

I get asked about slings from time to time and the big question is 2 point or single point. It’s an easy choice for me, 2 point all the way. The single point has some advantages, it holds the gun right where it needs to be to shoot and doesn’t hang too low when transitioning to pistol. The single point is also makes it pretty easy to transfer the gun to your non-dominate shoulder to shoot around cover. Outside of that there’s not much else it does well.

I decided to run the 2 point in 2006. I was at a master breacher course that was put on by a crazy dude that had us doing mechanical breaching on a pro timer. It was good times and put emphasis on getting in quickly, however some equipment issues quickly came to light! One of them was the single point sling. When slinging a ram or sledge hammer around, busting open doors and through block walls and such the rifle was all kinds of in the way. Then, add in jumping out of a van and climbing an 8 foot chain link fence to get to the structure, once again the rifle was in a bad place and making life suck. I thought to myself, there has to be a better way and of course there was, a 2 point adjustable sling.

The 2 point adjustable holds the gun closer to the body when the rifle is not in your hands and pushing the rifle to your back is awesome when you need to do some work like climbing, mechanical breaching, medical stuff, etc. There are several good 2 point adjustable slings out there to choose from. How you mount the sling on the rifle matters. I highly recommend attaching the sling to the longest points on the rifle you can. This keeps the gun tight to the body when pulled tight and stowed. I also believe in setting up the sling for 2 adjustments, loose and tight; I call them operational mode and storage mode.

In operational mode the sling should be loose enough for you to get the rifle into your shooter’s box/work space and also loose enough to keep the muzzle at 12 o’clock when moving at high ready. In operational mode the sling should not be so loose that the rifle hangs too low when transitioning to pistol.

In storage mode the the sling should hold the rifle nice and tight to your body up front or on your back, but still loos enough that you can shoot the rifle from storage mode. The 2 point adjustable slings can also be used for stability in long range shooting not so much with the single point. Swimming the support arm out of the sling makes it nice and easy to transition the rifle to your non-dominate shoulder for shooting around cover.

Long story short if you put a sling on your rifle I think it needs to do more than just hold the gun when you are not shooting.

- Frank Proctor

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Frank Proctor has served over 18 years in the military, the last 11 of those in US Army Special Forces. During his multiple combat tours in Afghanistan & Iraq he had the privilege to serve with and learn from many seasoned veteran Special Forces Operators so their combined years of knowledge and experience has helped him to become a better operator & instructor. While serving as an instructor at the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course he was drawn to competitive shooting. He has since earned the USPSA Grand Master ranking in the Limited Division and Master ranking in the IDPA Stock Service Pistol division. He learned a great deal from shooting in competition and this has helped him to become to become a better tactical shooter. Frank is one of the few individuals able to bring the experiences of U.S. Army Special Forces, Competitive Shooting, and veteran Instructor to every class.

All this experience combines to make Frank Proctor a well-rounded shooter and instructor capable of helping you to achieve your goal of becoming a better shooter.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Pannone

Saturday, October 12th, 2013

Pistols and courses of fire

There are a lot of great courses of fire out there that truly test marksmanship skill but we should identify the advantage/disadvantage or relative level of difficulty of the same course of fire given the type of pistol/caliber combination used and the relative accuracy of the gun. To make the point as clearly as possible I will use a well-known course of fire that is one of my favorites, the 700 point aggregate. It will challenge even the best shooters and has been a part of my training for 15 years now. The 700pt Aggregate is extremely gun dependent and truth be told was designed to be shot with a match grade gun. Shooting it with my Vickers Custom 1911 vs. my Glock 22 w/stock barrel is truly the difference of night and day. My LAV gun will shoot sub 1.5” @ 25 all day long and my G22 is working to shoot 2.5” with the stock barrel. That disparity constitutes a 40% smaller group potential at the outset. The accuracy capability of the LAV gun vs. the G22 is a distinct advantage. That is compounded by the crisp flat 1911 trigger vs. the Glock Safe-Action (even with the best trigger job I can do with a full power striker spring). There is nothing wrong with the Glock, I like and have carried them for personal defence, protection work (PSD), combat and sport so don’t get wound up yet. There are certain advantages with certain guns that lend themselves towards certain courses of fire. If you shoot a course of fire that is both accuracy and speed dependent with a match grade 1911 in 45 ACP and then the same course with the identical gun in 9mm who has the advantage now? Obviously the 9mm has the advantage due to recoil impulse. Now shoot that 9mm 1911 against a Beretta M9? Now put in high round count stages that mitigate the accuracy and emphasize the capacity? The gun gives you or gives up advantage by design, accuracy potential and capacity even in the same caliber. The point I am making is one I just made recently to a close friend from my SOF days who asked me “what are you shooting the 700 in nowadays?” My response was “with which gun?” A Glock 22 on a 12 round course of fire with the potential of make-up shots has an overwhelming advantage over a single-stack 1911. Shoot whatever you have and shoot the 700 point aggregate but make sure when you compare scores take into account what gun you’re shooting. Depending on the course of fire it will make a world of difference.

1. Model
2. Caliber
3. Size (compact/fullsize/long slide)
4. Trigger weight
5. Relative accuracy from the bench (I had a big name polymer gun shoot 4-6” groups @ 25 right out of the box. That alone would put a 700 Pt. Ag in the low 500’s instead of 600’s.)
6. Capacity

- Mike Pannone

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Mike Pannone retired from the Army’s premier assault force (1st SFOD-D) after an explosive breaching injury. A year after his retirement America was attacked on 9/11 and he returned to help serve his country as the head marksmanship instructor at the Federal Air Marshals training course and then moved to help stand up the FAMS Seattle field office. In 2003 he left the FAMS to serve as a PSD detail member and then a detail leader for the State Department during 2003 and 2004 in Baghdad and Tikrit.

In 2005 he served as a ground combat advisor of the Joint Counter IED Task Force and participated on combat operations with various units in Al Anbar province. Upon returning he gave IED awareness briefings to departing units and helped stand up a pre-Iraq surge rifle course with the Asymmetric Warfare Group as a lead instructor. With that experience as well as a career of special operations service in Marine Reconnaissance, Army Special Forces and JSOC to draw from he moved to the private sector teaching planning, leadership, marksmanship and tactics as well as authoring and co-authoring several books such as The M4 Handbook, AK Handbook and Tactical Pistol shooting. Mike also consults for several major rifle and accessory manufacturers to help them field the best possible equipment to the warfighter, law enforcement officer and upstanding civilian end user. He is considered a subject matter expert on the AR based Stoner platform in all its derivatives.

www.ctt-solutions.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Larry Vickers

Saturday, October 5th, 2013

‘No matter what a manufacturer tells you never go more than 5000 rds before replacing the recoil spring in your pistol – and in most cases much less. This is one of the often overlooked reasons for malfunctions and part failure in a handgun; particularly in unit or department issued weapons’

-Larry Vickers
Vickers Tactical Inc.
Host of TacTV

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Larry Vickers of Vickers Tactical in a retired US Army 1st SFOD-Delta combat veteran with years of experience in the firearms industry as a combat marksmanship instructor and industry consultant. In recent years he has hosted tactical firearms related TV shows on the Sportsman Channel with the latest being TacTV of which Bravo Company is a presenting sponsor.Larry Vickers special operations background is one of the most unique in the industry today; he has been directly or indirectly involved in the some of the most significant special operations missions of the last quarter century. During Operation Just Cause he participated in Operation Acid Gambit – the rescue of Kurt Muse from Modelo Prison in Panama City, Panama. As a tactics and marksmanship instructor on active duty he helped train special operations personnel that later captured Saddam Hussein and eliminated his sons Uday and Qusay Hussein. In addition he was directly involved in the design and development of the HK416 for Tier One SOF use which was used by Naval Special Warfare personnel to kill Osama Bin Laden. Larry Vickers has developed various small arms accessories with the most notable being his signature sling manufactured by Blue Force Gear and Glock accessories made by Tangodown. In addition he has maintained strong relationships with premium companies within the tactical firearms industry such as BCM, Aimpoint, Black Hills Ammunition, Wilson Combat and Schmidt & Bender.

Larry Vickers travels the country conducting combat marksmanship classes for law abiding civilians, law enforcement and military and has partnered with Alias Training to coordinate classes to best meet the needs of the students attending the class.

www.VickersTactical.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

Generally, Kyle shares training and employment tips but we thought that you’d like to see another side of Defoor. He’s an avid outdoorsman and shares reviews of equipment he uses for work and play on his blog.

Not a lot of gear reviews lately here. I’ve been turning down more gear lately than normal. I’ve also been advising manufacturers from different industries why the things they send to me suck so bad, and believe me, some of the stuff I’ve seen recently really does.

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With that said, I’ve had the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer for almost a year now. I wanted to get a lot of cold time in it before I made a call and I wanted to really work in it to see the durability, which I admit, I was concerned with at first.

The CEO of Mission Ready Equipment sent me the GW with the words- “you’re not gonna believe it”. That about sums it up. It’s almost unbelievably warm for what it is.

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What it is is a 7oz (my scale, MH says 8) down jacket that will fit in your back pocket (yes it hangs out a little but not much) that has down in it that has been “infused” ( don’t ask me) to make it almost waterproof (I’m a toad man, so nothing is waterproof to me). I’ve been in rain with it and so far it lives up to the hype. The outside shell is a nylon that my only complaint is its shininess (I don’t think MH is too much about lo pro judging from the yellow zips on my Drystein), and of course it’s loud for hunting, but I simply wear a shirt over top and it’s golden.

Combined with above said rain shell it is comfortable with only a t-shirt down to low-mid thirties easily. I would venture to say the GW is as warm as a “normal” 600-800 fill down jacket but obviously without the weight, bulk, and inability to get wet and still perform.

It’s so damn small and “nothing” feeling that it takes some time with it and some nerve to take it as your only thermal piece. I’ve done that many times and it has yet to let me down. One day, I even did my normal range setup by carrying steel ipscs on my shoulder 200 yards for 40 mins wearing the GW and it didn’t tear. I mean you could rip it with something sharp if you weren’t careful but it’s as durable as any normal nylon type jacket.

For those that have ventured down the super light weight jacket road before, think of this as a Patagonia ultra light down shirt that is twice as warm and the same size, or very similar to a Montbell Alpine but more durable IMHO.

Highly recommended for anyone but especially for those who are of a minimalist mindset.
Find it here- www.missionreadyequipment.com/mountain-hardwear-ghost-whisperer-jacket-mens

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He now serves as the brand ambassador for Mission Ready Equipment and runs his own company which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

www.kyledefoor.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Frank Proctor

Saturday, September 14th, 2013

There are plenty of ways to load a semi auto pistol or rifle. Many years ago I was trained to perform a “deliberate” load procedure. I am a firm believer in some sort of deliberate load procedure. I use it as a chance to get 1 more repetition on things that matter and an inspection of the gun to make sure it’ll work when needed.

My full on load procedure goes as follows; find something small in a safe direction to present the gun to, this is a great chance to rehearse a shot sequence and see the gun come to what you are looking at. After a short marination on what “right looks like” bring the gun into your workspace and lock the slide or bolt to the rear. At this point I do a 4 point check, inspecting the chamber, magwell, breach face and one more look to the chamber. After a quick inspection of the gun, grab s magazine from your ” go to” spot and perform the mechanics of a reload while driving the gun back to what you were looking at. Once the reload is rehearsed I perform a press check for confirmation that there’s a round in the chamber. I then reset that mag pouch and check any other lights or lasers on the gun. For matches I’ll check my other mags and make sure they aren’t loaded too tight for an action forward reload.

This load procedure has never cost me anything and had prevented me from having that uncomfortable click no bang situations I’ve seen happen to shooters who load differently. Some items of note, the deliberate load procedure can be modified but I believe in getting more reps if you can. I will always do the press check, it’s just too easy and do critical. I perform this whole procedure with the trigger finger on the frame of the gun.

Here’s a video talking through the deliberate load and a coupled other techniques:

- Frank Proctor

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Frank Proctor has served over 18 years in the military, the last 11 of those in US Army Special Forces. During his multiple combat tours in Afghanistan & Iraq he had the privilege to serve with and learn from many seasoned veteran Special Forces Operators so their combined years of knowledge and experience has helped him to become a better operator & instructor. While serving as an instructor at the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course he was drawn to competitive shooting. He has since earned the USPSA Grand Master ranking in the Limited Division and Master ranking in the IDPA Stock Service Pistol division. He learned a great deal from shooting in competition and this has helped him to become to become a better tactical shooter. Frank is one of the few individuals able to bring the experiences of U.S. Army Special Forces, Competitive Shooting, and veteran Instructor to every class.

All this experience combines to make Frank Proctor a well-rounded shooter and instructor capable of helping you to achieve your goal of becoming a better shooter.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

You Never Know Where They’ll Show Up

Tuesday, September 10th, 2013

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Looks like Kyle Defoor’s students we having a great time at a recent class in SoCal.

Thanks Alias for the pic!