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Posts Tagged ‘BCM’

BCMGUNFIGHTER Quick Detachable Sling Mount (M-LOK Compatible)

Thursday, November 16th, 2017

BCM has introduced a new line of M-Lok compatible rails and accessories. One of my favorite items is this QD Sling Mount.

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It has eight locking positions and is all steel construction.

www.bravocompanyusa.com/BCM-M-LOK-Quick-Detachable-Sling-Mount-p/bcm-mcmr-sm

Gunfighter Moment – Aaron Barruga

Saturday, October 21st, 2017

You Won’t Become A Better Tactical Marksman Until You Become A Stronger Tactical Leader

Aaron Barruga

As a twenty year old Special Forces sergeant, I was predictably overconfident and periodically arrogant. I was strong and fast, but that was mostly because of youth. I was great at shooting drills. But only because I could learn sequences and had no clue as to which skills impacted my performance overall. I exploited my status as “Special Forces” and allowed conventional soldiers to mistake my confidence with competence, when in reality I was often winging it.

My performance in controlled environments—or training—was only an indicator of just that, my performance in training. I was strong, but couldn’t lead. I could shoot fast, but couldn’t train others to do the same. My first trip to the Philippines changed these realities through a healthy bruising of ego.

My team was working with a Philippine Army infantry unit and teaching them US small-unit fighting techniques. During the trip, I was tasked with teaching a 2-hour block of instruction on hemorrhage control and care under fire. Fortunately, my team already possessed a slide deck for the class from a previous deployment, so most of the preparation for my course was already accomplished.

I bombed my presentation.

I failed because I committed the most annoying error as a lecturer, I read off slides and when questioned I simply restated what I had already said previously. Although I understood the steps to take during care under fire, it was only because I had learned to follow sequences. I knew the answers to questions, but not because I knew the answer, but because I knew what phrase to regurgitate. Fortunately, the practical exercises and hands-on portion of the class allowed students to work through what I failed to explain.

Transitioning to the range, I was allowed back in my comfort zone of shooting drills as quickly as I could. This satisfied my vanity, but again demonstrated that I didn’t really know anything. One of the Filipino soldiers I was coaching needed serious improvement on his application of trigger control. Attempting to coach this soldier, I executed the same error as the day prior in my medical class. Rather than teaching, I was simply regurgitating the right answer.

The Filipino soldier experienced issues because he was shooting too quickly which made him sloppy. My solution was the regurgitated answer of “slow down.” Although slowing down would have helped the shooter, it was supplemental and not the primary solution. Watching us run racetracks around the same problem, a senior teammate came over and mentored me through how to teach the right answer.

To truly mentor a student, whether in the gym, the classroom, or on the range, you have to encourage him to pursue a line of thinking in which he arrives at both wrong and right answers. During this process you must guide him through the critical thinking process that allows for real learning.

However, the military and law enforcement are not accustomed to this style of teaching. The martial and conservative nature of these organizations often results in teaching that is a one-sided dialogue. Although a recruit might have a question, he dare not ask it and seem stupid, or become the center of attention for a bad instructor that is more interested in punishing basic trainees. Consequently, a majority of tactical professionals are indoctrinated at a very early point in their career to seek regurgitation, not actual learning.

My teammate had been shooting longer than me, but that’s not why he was able to remedy my situation. In diverse environments working with individuals of different skill levels and different levels of being coachable, he learned that being a subject matter expert doesn’t mean knowing the right answer, it also means knowing the wrong answers, and how they all tie in together to support the broader learning objectives.

Leadership forces a type of accountability that cannot be learned as a lone-wolf. As a junior Green Beret, I had minimal responsibility and made decisions that supported my missions, not the performance of others. At company-level range days, if the primary instructor taught something I thought was boring, I would physically roll my eyes in the back of the crowd. Rather than focussing on the basics, I wanted to perform exercises that I thought looked cool.

Of course, the principle issue with exercises that look cool is that they are often self-serving. We see this dynamic a lot on Instagram now. Shooters running around, tossing kettle bells, throwing rocks at students, and punching rubber mannequins. Although these actions are enticing and appear purposeful, they typically develop no compoundable skills and lack external applicability. Under these circumstances, performing these drills only makes you good at performing the drills.

Shooting cool drills did nothing for me because I couldn’t deconstruct and identify the different skills being exercised. Again, I could regurgitate what the right answers were, but that was not always significant as previously demonstrated. It wasn’t until I was given more responsibility and promoted to higher positions of leadership that I was able to identify what was truly important about any skills development.

As an individual, you can default to the regurgitation fallacy and not even know it. This is simply because your focus is narrow. But if the collective performance of subordinates impacts mission success—or life and death—it forces a comprehensive examination of how you develop stronger troops. This allows leaders to transcend teaching methods that are self-serving and approaches that encourage drills that only satisfy drills.

There is nothing wrong with wanting to shoot the fastest, or being able to lift the most weight. But focussing on narrow end states undermines our overall growth. For example, who wins a gunfight, the police officer that can deadlift 550lbs or the one who can only deadlift 325lbs?

Regurgitators want to shoot drills that demonstrate speed, but they can’t explain how to develop consistent speed, and not just a one-time shot timer success. They want to argue over bumper sticker tactics and subjective performance variables such as “how much finger you place on the trigger because such and such said so.” None of these actions require accountability that is learned through leadership, it just demands that you shout louder than the person you’re arguing with.

Leadership also forces you to examine the possible second and third order of effects of a decision. Whether intended or not, every action creates reactions. In the heat of the moment, predicting unintended consequences can be difficult, but is an indicator of your value added to the team and the mission.

As a junior Green Beret, all I brought to the table was an enthusiasm for lifting weights and shooting. As a result, I was not a long-term asset. In order to truly improve your ability as a tactical marksman you must become a stronger leader; because leadership forces professional maturity that cannot be achieved alone, no matter how many reps you put in at the range or in the gym.

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Aaron Barruga is Special Forces veteran with deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Pacific Theater of Operations. He has trained foreign commandos, police officers, and militia fighters. He is the founder at Guerrilla Approach LLC, where he consults law enforcement officers on counter-terrorism and vehicle tactics.

www.guerrillaapproach.com
www.facebook.com/guerrillaapproach
www.instagram.com/guerrilla_approach

Bravo Company – Combat Rail Systems

Thursday, October 19th, 2017

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COMBAT RAIL SYSTEMS
Designed to the specification of combat end users, BCM® Combat Rail Systems are built free float, for improved accuracy, with Aluminum alloys, that are light weight but do not compromise rigidity. Mission flexible platforms, ideal for end user customization in the placement of optics and accessories such as light mounts, vertical grips, hand stops, lasers and bi-pods; BCM Combat Rail Systems are available in three interface systems:

+ KeyMod™
+ M-LOK®*
+ 1913 Picatinny Rail

Whatever your mission requires, bcm offers products ready for any American going in harm’s way.

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KMR ALPHA :: KEYMOD™ SYSTEMS
The BCM® KeyMod Rail(KMR-Alpha) delivers a robust, ultra-light modular handguard for the AR platform, second to none on the market today.

Manufactured from Aircraft Grade Aluminum alloy, the KMR-A gives end users an extensive range of customization options, with seven KeyMod lined mounting surfaces and one with baked in MIL-STD-1913 at the 12 O’Clock position. The KMR-A features ergonomics tailored to combat end user requirements, with its reduced profiled maximized for positive control of the weapon system in the lightest possible package.

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MCMR :: M-LOK® COMPATIBLE MODULAR RAIL SYSTEM
The BCM® M-LOK® Compatible* Modular Rail” (MCMR) delivers the same optimized ergonomic profile and lock up** developed for the KMR-Alpha rail system, but with an M-LOK® compatible interface. Precision Machined Aerospace 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy, the MCMR is both rigid and light-weight, featuring mounting interfaces on seven sides in addition to the baked in MIL-STD-1913 at the 12 O’Clock position.

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QRF :: QUAD RAIL FREE FLOAT RAIL SYSTEM
A MIL-STD-1913 rail, the BCM® QRF(Quad Rail Free Float) Rail System is built with Picatinny Rails running the full length of the handguard at 12, 3, 6 and 9 O’Clock. Precision machined from high-strength lightweight Aerospace 6061-T6 Aluminum Alloy, the BCM QRF features the same lock up* as and steel barrel nut insuring the rail resists movement even under extreme use.

With four QD limited rotation sling swivel slots built into the rail at 3 and 6 O’Clock, the QRF provides end users an uninterrupted mounting surface at 12 O’Clock when mated with a BCM or other Mil-Spec upper receiver, allowing for the fine tuned positioning of optics, lasers or other accessories potentially vital to mission success.

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COMBAT RAIL LOCK UP
The entire BCM® Combat Rail System fleet uses our patented(US Patent 8904691) lock up system where self-locking cross bolts apply force at the 12:00 position of the handguard equally distributing force around the surface area of the rail. This insures continuous top center alignment of the rail and mitigates forwards/backwards movement of the handguard when the weapon system is fired.

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MADE IN AMERICA
All BCM® Combat Rail Systems and accessories unite state of the art manufacturing with lightweight and durable materials to ensure components that last a lifetime, performing far beyond performance requirements established nearly six decades ago. Like all BCM rifles and BCMGUNFIGHTER™ accessories, all BCM Combat Rail Systems are made in the USA.

Learn more at bravocompanymfg.com/combat_rails

* M-LOK® is a registered trademark of Magpul Industries Corp. – www.magpul.com/ip
** Bravo Company MFG, Inc. US Patent 8904691

The Capability – An Original BCM Production

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

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The Capability is a brand new series from Bravo Company, directed by Jon Chang of American Gunfighter and Black Powder Red Earth fame. You can view the first episode by clicking the image above.

Check out the official release at soldiersystems.net/2017/08/31/the-capability-an-original-bcm-production.

The Capability – An Original BCM Production

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

BCM

Hartland, WI – August 31, 2017 – BCM is proud to announce, The Capability, a new series produced by BCM and created and directed by Jon Chang (creator/director of the American Gunfighter documentary series and the Black Powder Red Earth™ graphic novel series).

The first chapter of The Capability is a demonstration showcasing instructors from Northern Red working side by side with students from a counter terrorism unit, executing a multi-breach multi-team hostage rescue mission.

Staffed exclusively with US Army Special Operations combat veterans, Northern Red specializes in developing core skills, the application of those skills and internal cultural transformations of law enforcement and security forces at metropolitan and national levels. BCM provides Northern Red the most capable and reliable weapon systems possible, required for high-risk zero fail missions such as hostage rescue, combat raids and high threat dignitary protection missions domestically or abroad.

The Capability is a celebration of the men selected to preserve our nation at tip of the spear.

Stream the episode on YouTube here youtu.be/3yReIGUV9UE

Learn more about Northern Red’s services at NorthernRedTraining.com and BCM weapon systems at BravoCompanyMFG.com

Gunfighter Moment – Aaron Barruga

Saturday, August 19th, 2017

AS VEHICLES BECOME THE PREFERRED WEAPON OF TERROR ATTACKS, PATROL OFFICERS SHOULD BE FAMILIAR WITH THESE 5 CONCEPTS

Aaron Barruga
August 18th, 2017

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Since Thursday, 13 people have been killed and 100 more injured as vehicles were driven into crowds in Eastern Spain as part of terror attacks executed by the Islamic State. In March, a car plowed through pedestrians on the Westminster Bridge in London, killing 5 and injuring 49. Last December, a truck driven through a crowd in Berlin killed 11 people and injured 56.

For terrorists, vehicles pose numerous tactical advantages over traditional small arms or explosive attacks. For these reasons, law enforcement officers should consider the following five concepts.

1: PRE-STAGING A VEHICLE PATROL RIFLE
Whether in the trunk, the center console, or the back of a motorcycle, officers must be familiar with the rapid employment of carbines or any weapon capable of defeating windshields and door panels. Simple dry-fire exercises such as releasing the carbine from its mount and dismounting the vehicle can help with minimizing officer response times during crises.

If responding to crises, officers should consider releasing the carbine and staging it for quick access on the passenger seat of their patrol car. The ability to arrive on scene and immediately step out of his vehicle with a patrol rifle allows an officer to be an immediate force multiplier when responding to crises.

Stow your sling with rubber bands or similar retainers. Slings that hang loosely inside of vehicle mounts can create unnecessary headache should an officer need to rapidly dismount his vehicle. To ensure a patrol rifle’s sling doesn’t catch on dashboard equipment or the steering wheel, slings should be stowed against the patrol rifle with rubber bands. When stowing a sling with rubber bands, remember to build in a quick release by “s” folding the sling. This allows it to move freely of the carbine when an officer decides to sling his patrol rifle.

2: UNDERSTAND SAFE WEAPON READY POSITIONS
Vehicle attacks are most likely to occur in urban environments because of the target density available to terrorists. Responding officers will need to navigate through crowds, possibly with weapons at the ready. Officers must feel confident running with both carbines and pistols in these confined areas. The ability to move aggressively in and around terrain without flagging bystanders or fellow officers is critical for a safe response.

When teaching ready positions, competency should not be sacrificed in favor of misinterpreted simplicity. Despite sayings such as “more tools for your toolbox,” during a stressful situation individuals fall back on the technique that they have the most repetitions performing. Furthermore, utilize common sense when validating ready positions. If a technique contradicts the tenets of developing competent shooters (such as placing a pistol against the shooter’s forehead for “safety”) avoid these methods so that you can instead develop more well-rounded tactical responders.

3: THE DANGERS OF SYMPATHETIC FIRE
Our senses are overwhelmed by stimulus in urban environments. In close quarter engagements, over saturation may cause an individual to pull a trigger as part of a sympathetic reaction to another officer shooting. It is paramount that officers always understand what lay in front and behind the threats they are engaging.

4: HOW TO CLEAR A VEHICLE AS A SINGLETON
The exigent circumstances of terror or active shooter attacks might demand that an officer individually clear vehicles containing suspects. Although certain protocol might advise officers to wait for backup or even SWAT, in his dying breaths a terrorist’s resolve might be to continue killing bystanders. For this reason, an officer must feel confident in his ability to clear a vehicle by himself. This does not suggest that officers unnecessarily put themselves at risk, but it also does not excuse them from performing the task should it be necessary.

5: IMPROVISE, ADAPT, AND OVERCOME.
In preparing for urban terror attacks, perform scenario training that encourages adaptability and abandons rigid training approaches, or “if this, then that” mentalities. Despite being labeled as “stress induced” or “unscripted,” a lot of scenario based training fails officers because the techniques taught only work under the very narrow guidelines of the specific training scenario. This produces officers that are great at navigating artificial training environments, but these individuals are more likely to freeze when responding to the spontaneous nature of a real fight.

It is impossible to predict exactly how an attack will be executed, or what exactly will transpire on the ground during the attack. For these reasons, it is critical that officers participate in training that encourages both flexibility and decisiveness.

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Aaron Barruga is Special Forces veteran with deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Pacific Theater of Operations. He has trained foreign commandos, police officers, and militia fighters. He is the founder at Guerrilla Approach LLC, where he consults law enforcement officers on counter-terrorism and vehicle tactics.

www.guerrillaapproach.com
www.facebook.com/guerrillaapproach
www.instagram.com/guerrilla_approach

Gunfighter History Pt 5 CSR – Concealable Sniper Rifle

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

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The M24 Remington Bolt Action Rifle has been the standard in accuracy and reliability for the US Army since 1998. Consistently delivering sub MOA performance on demand, the M24 is 43″ overall length is very much, a traditional sniper rifle.

Today, more than half the world’s population lives in urban spaces. Drawn by economic opportunities, social connectivity, infrastructure and better standards of living, the useable landmass of these metro areas can only support so many people giving rise to a sprawl of smaller cities, suburbs and slums, often built directly adjacent to the primary area. Built specifically around zero fail missions in these settings, we needed a sniper rifle that was maneuverable and could be end user carries with a reduced signature.

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At first, we explored gas guns. While making excellent battle rifles, a gas gun, no matter the tolerances, cannot predictably deliver the pronounced accuracy of a bolt gun.

From the ground up, the receiver on AR10 pattern rifles simply does not have the mass to retain a heavy contour precision barrel in a predictable position after it settles from a shot. Also, while tight chambers improved accuracy on manually fed bolt guns, in practice, they caused reliability issues when magazine fed by a gas or piston weapon system because, even 95% performance is not 100% of the time.

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Built for the M118LR round, we started with the Surgeon 591 SA(Short Action) and a 16″ 308 barrel. This “short” barrel would make the weapon system easier to maneuver and could be removed to further reduce the end user’s profile. The barrel could then replaced with zero effect to the 1/2 inch groups the CSR consistently delivered, thanks to the tolerances Surgeon used/uses in manufacturing their barrels.

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Housing the Surgeon action and barrel, is a Remington Accessory Chassis System (RACS). Not only the lighter than other rifle chassis, it is one of the fastest to break down and set up, with only 3 bolts needed to remove the handguard. The free float handguard is modular, allowing user configuration to keep the weapon as light as possible and features wire channels and plugs to route and manage cables.

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The RACS also features a skeletonized folding stock with adjustment in the recoil pad and cheek height to support a range of scopes with bells and objective lenses of varying size. Stock folded, it can be fit into a normal sized bag, something seen in every day life, and still be immediately accessible to the end user if the situation dictated. That put a 800 meter gun in a day pack. A capability unlike any other at that point in time.

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Fully loaded, the CSR is about the size of a M4. It can be maneuvered quickly through doors, windows, alleys, ladders, and hallways without encumbering the end user. It can live alongside of a carbine in a vehicle, meaning it can go everywhere and be deployed at the same speed as a carbine.

Today, the CSR is employed by law enforcement and security professionals in the exact settings and mission it was designed for. It is second to none.

Assorted contributors to include
Tyler Payne
Shawn Wiseman

www.bravocompanyusa.com

BCM Launches Video & Media Archive 

Tuesday, June 20th, 2017

Hartland, WI, June 20, 2017 – BCM® has launched a Media & News Archive, an online gallery featuring the Company’s photography and film productions since October 2013, when the KMR(KeyMod™ Modular Rail) was first announced.
Charting the history of BCM’s continual innovation and performance enhancing control accessories for AR15 pattern carbines, the Archive also includes the American Gunfighter online video series and interviews with founder Paul Buffoni, as well as the Gunfighter History pieces created by Larry Vickers, JD Potynsky, Kyle Defoor and Travis Haley.

The site is viewable at media.bravocompanymfg.com and accessible from the nav on the main website www.bravocompanymfg.com.