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Gunfighter Moment – Mike Glover

Saturday, February 18th, 2017

Before the Global War On Terror, quantifying specific variables in a gunfight was like quantifying quantum physics. It’s a difficult undertaking without specific data – and any data was better than “I heard from a buddy that knew a guy.”

Now with the acceleration of the war on terror and concurrent advances in technology, we have a plethora of case studies, video, and stories from the men and women who were literally there. There is no more “theory,” but a wealth of the specific data we’ve been missing, and with that data we can begin to determine and extrapolate what works versus what doesn’t.

I remember getting into my first contact with the enemy. Looking back on it, it wasn’t what I expected – it wasn’t dynamic, it didn’t involve complex thought or replicate the things I was taught at the range. When analyzing this process I realized I didn’t even apply the basics I had been taught, it was all a reflex, all second nature and slightly reckless. I was confronted with a threat; it was him versus me and I realized afterward that I didn’t have time to prep my trigger, seat my stock, or even acquire a sight picture. The only things I had time to do were align and press, get my bore in line with the closest thing I could get to center and smash my trigger as fast as I could.

As I developed my skillsets in war the realization dawned that in an offensive action I only had milliseconds to react if the enemy I was hunting was ready and waiting for me, and that everything I had been taught was far more difficult to apply in reality. This is a stark contrast to other occupations – in a gunfight outside of deliberate actions and raids in the military, you react to or counter threats, which puts you behind the living curve.

For example: let’s say you’re a police officer, reacting to a domestic violence call. When you arrive the suspect is nowhere to be found. As you sweep the residence the victim of the domestic violence advises you that the suspect is armed and acting erratically so you are now expecting contact, and behind the living curve. Let’s say you clear into a corner-fed room, feeding into a bathroom that has visibility on the corner-fed room’s door, but your focus is on the blind spot of the dead space in that room. As you move your eyes and gun into position you see something, a flash of what you think is a light but instead it’s your eyes recognizing a foreign entity – in this case, the barrel of a revolver pointed right at your head. Your eyes get wide, your adrenaline tsunamis your being. Everything is in slow motion. Your eyes and brain see the threat, and the barrel of your gun is still in dead space…

Ok, let’s stop there, and consider what we know from our training. In training, we’re taught that once we step through a threshold we need to check corners and clear dead space. Right or wrong, that’s a fundamental – but every time I’ve done force on force or UTM/Sims training, if a bad guy sits one room deep he can kill every good guy who steps through that threshold, time after time.

I remember the first time I was taught to think outside of the convention in small-arm tactics – a team-mate of mine, who belonged to an elite CT unit, told me “don’t be in a rush to just clear and commit to a room. Clear a much as you possibly can prior to entry, even if you have to go prone.” That latter part of his statement really stuck with me, “even if you have to go prone.” This wasn’t advice being taught from theory, this was being taught from reality, from truly unpredictable situations experienced in warfare, and it made absolute sense. Committing to a fight in which your opponent is aware of and can take advantage of your weaknesses is committing to a losing battle, and there will be no second chance, no opportunity to learn from a fatal mistake.

Back to our earlier scenario. When someone has a gun, and they have it pointed at you, you need to be able to send rounds toward that threat and neutralize in immediately. Seeing a threat with your eyes that you’re not instantly ready to deal with puts you at the mercy of your enemy’s reaction time. Clear with your eyes with your gun in tow; and when expecting contact you must clear methodically and thoroughly prior to entering the breach point. Never race in unprepared, that leads to mistakes and sets you up for ambushes. While training is necessary, it doesn’t always reflect the situations we find ourselves up against, and can ultimately hamper our perception of reality. As long as your training institution understands this logic, and can work toward providing you with the tools necessary to get closer to reality, you’re with the right venue. Remember, experience is always better than theory.

– Mike Glover
FieldCraft LLC

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A former Special Forces disabled veteran with more than 18 years of military service, Mike has operated at the highest levels of Special Forces. Deploying 15 times to combat theaters, he has served in the following positions: SF Weapons Specialist, SF Sniper, SF Assaulter/Operator, SF Recon Specialist, SF Joint Terminal Air Controller (JTAC), SF Team Sgt, and SF Operations SGM.

Mike is a certified U.S. Government federal firearms instructor, and has also has trained mobility with Team O’Neil Rally School, BSR Racing, and BW drivers courses. He is medically trained every two years in Advanced Medical Trauma and continually maintains his re-certifications for consultation practices.

Considered a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in planning and executing Special Operations in a myriad of complex environments, Mike has taken his 18 years of experience and is giving the American citizen the applicable training tools and training necessary to better protect themselves and their families here and abroad.

Mike has a Bachelors degree in Crisis management and homeland security with American Military University and is pursuing his masters in military history.

Mike currently lives in northern California, where he continues to consult for the U.S. Government in security and firearms instruction.

www.fieldcraftsurvival.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Bravo Company Manufacturing – Mod 0 SOPMOD Stock

Monday, February 13th, 2017

SOPMOD BCM

Click to view .pdf

February 13, 2017 Hartland, WI – BCM introduces the Mod 0 SOPMOD Stock, a drop-in replacement stock for the M4 Carbine, built to be lighter and more durable than base issue equipment with an enhanced contour for an improved cheek weld.

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Delivering a consistent and stable platform, without sacrificing the clean snag free design of the Mod 0 Minimalist Stock released in 2014, the BCM Mod 0 SOPMOD Stock is a product of continued refinement based on end user feedback and close work with leading tactical and weapons manipulation instructors and the end users they prepare for going into harm’s way.

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Both the BCMGUNFIGHTER™ Mod 0 SOPMOD and the Mod 0 Minimalist stocks feature a patented internal latch system*, a built-in buttpad, a VBOS(Vehicle Borne Operations Sling) Tab and both an ambidextrous QD interface port and web slot for sling interface.

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Like all BCM rifles and BCMGUNFIGHTER accessories, the Mod 0 Stocks are designed and made in the USA with the lightest and most durable materials to ensure components that last a lifetime.

Both stocks are available today on BravoCompanyUSA.com

To learn more about the BCM Mod 0 Series of stocks visit http://bravocompanymfg.com/stock/

Note: United States Patent Number: 9,109,855

BCM’s Homage To John Wick

Saturday, February 11th, 2017

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John Wick Chapter 2 is now out in theaters, so it seems an appropriate time to put up this series of photos BCM released as an homage to the John Wick series.

www.bravocompanyusa.com

Gunfighter Moment – Aaron Barruga

Saturday, January 14th, 2017

We Can Do Better At Training Leaders

One of the most important ass chewings I received in the military was at Robin Sage. During the final phase of tactical training in the Q-Course, I experienced a case of senioritis that impacted my performance. As the patrol leader for a routine ambush mission, I apathetically presented an operations order to my evaluating cadre. Because the ambush is the baseline for teaching military planning and tactics, Green Beret candidates are drilled to the point of exhaustion (and boredom) in the science of mission preparation and execution via ambushes. This familiarity led to a presentation in which I tried to demonstrate how confident I was by delivering a halfhearted mission briefing, classic “too kool for skool” behavior.

Critical to these briefings is the execution portion in which every element confirms its specific tasks with adjacent friendlies and the broader scheme of the operation. This requires precise detail so there is no confusion, but is unavoidably dry and boring in delivery. I thought I could speed through this section by using phrases such as “situation dependent” or “context will dictate”. The evaluating cadre let me get about halfway through before he cut me off.

Releasing a sigh, he looked me straight in the eyes and said, “STOP… Everything in life is situation dependent. Stop speaking in generalities like some bullshit chapter from Sun Zsu’s the ‘Art of War’. Everything about a combat operation is uncertain, that is why we attempt to be as precise as possible during planning” (this was an Army ass chewing, so there were of course a lot more expletives). I was kicked out of my own mission briefing and left to wonder if I had just failed the final phase of Special Forces training.

A few months later, I was on an ODA learning SF’s brand of CQB. During breaks, the other new guys and myself would debate the validity of the different CQB techniques being taught. This was ridiculous. The entire time we misused phrases such as “situation dependent” and “shooter’s preference”. We thought we were adding context to our arguments, but were instead failing to clarify our viewpoints. In reality, we didn’t need to have opinions, we needed to keep our mouths shut and learn. Unlike my use of vagueness in Robin Sage to demonstrate confidence, in the shoot house we failed to clarify our statements because we couldn’t substantiate our opinions with any real evidence or experience. This type of behavior is best described as the “contextual fallacy”.

There is nothing wrong with adding context by declaring “shooter’s preference” and “situation dependent”. For some instructors, it’s a passive habit developed through public speaking. However, there is a difference between framing a concept through contextual statements, versus hijacking these phrases so that we can weasel out of critical thinking. Although shades of grey exist in every situation, it is the job of instructors to clarify uncertainty. After all, you are paying them in part to do so. When they utilize the context fallacy, instructors typically get a pass because their non-committal stance is perceived as a zen-like state of mind. This appeal to authority fools the amatuer, inhibits the growth of the professional, and shifts the norms of the tactical community as a whole towards accepting mediocrity.

In fairness, it is exhausting to approach all new information through a lense of robust analysis. But if that information is gathered for the purpose of being utilized in tactical engagements, in which our lives or the lives of others will be put in danger, shouldn’t this signal a decrease in our willingness to dwell in uncertainty? The contextual fallacy also fools us when it is used to critique procedural rigidity and behavior that discourages adaptability. Yes, we must remain vulnerable to new concepts, but this shouldn’t come at the expense of declaring what we know to be more true than false. Wallowing in vagueness by proclaiming “context!” affords lukewarm arguments a safety net that deteriorates one of our most critical skills as tactical leaders, decisiveness.

Decisiveness does not imply a willingness to reject new information, and instead establishes a foundation that allows us to analyze new details. If we fail to take a stance, we can confuse good luck with good tactics, and jump to haphazard conclusions with incomplete data. We must always ask: what is the evidence, how good is the evidence, are there real world examples that disprove the evidence? Well rounded leaders ask these questions and do their best to falsify unvetted concepts. This does not always need to be a lengthy task, but it does require scholarship beyond browsing 15-second Instagram videos. Absent of this approach, we simply collect facts that can be contradictory, confusing, and catastrophic when used in real tactical engagements.

During battle, leaders must immediately recognize patterns under ambiguous and exigent circumstances. Acting with too little information can be dangerous (e.g. getting baited into a larger attack), but delaying action, when in fact recognizable patterns have occurred, is just as dangerous. Organizations that permit the contextual fallacy as an acceptable line of thinking will inevitably produce individuals that are incapable of assuming leadership during time sensitive operations or crisis management. In these situations, rarely will you possess the desired amount of information and resources; yet decisions still must be made and acted upon. This indicates the importance of promoting the development of decisiveness as a part of tactical learning. We do not create leaders capable of adapting to harsh environments by shortchanging them in training that discourages critical thinking.

But what kind of organization would willingly permit the context fallacy? Most typically do not, and the context fallacy is an undiagnosed cancer that goes unobserved until an agency participates in large-scale training exercises such as active shooter. This is best displayed when a team spends fifteen minutes running through a scenario, then fifty minutes arguing about how they should have attacked the problem. Although discourse should be encouraged, all opinions are not equal and hierarchies of knowledge must be enforced. Ignoring these truths ultimately fails to develop new recruits into potential leaders. Worse, if left unchecked in an organization’s culture, few individuals will be capable of differentiating between ideas that sound good versus ideas that are actually actionable.

The context fallacy is so seductive because it allows individuals to bargain way beyond their means and level of experience. Even better, the moment firm opposition arises, they can retreat back into obscurity with no consequences. This behavior is the antithesis of attaining knowledge because it doesn’t require any discipline, and more importantly, it doesn’t allow for failure. An individual simply observes what others are doing, stands on their shoulders to accomplish something, and then if he fails, he doesn’t take any of the responsibility for it. We must recognize that context frames a situation, but the context fallacy should not be used to bailout weak ideas and cherry-picked information.


Aaron Barruga is Special Forces veteran with deployments to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Pacific Theater of Operations. He has trained foreign commandos, police officers, and militia fighters. He is the founder at Guerrilla Approach LLC, where he consults law enforcement officers on counter-terrorism and vehicle tactics.

www.guerrillaapproach.com
www.facebook.com/guerrillaapproach
www.instagram.com/guerrilla_approach

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Inside The M4 Carbine

Saturday, December 31st, 2016

BCM and Vickers Tactical Take You Inside The M4 Carbine. This is pretty cool.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Mike Glover

Saturday, December 10th, 2016

The Battle Rifle
Evolving at the Speed of War

In 2007, during the height of the war against extremists in Iraq, I was a sniper with the Commander In-Extremis Force (CIF)[a] operating out of Baghdad. We conducted unilateral operations against HVTs, targeting these as part of a larger task force known as TF-16. While conducting these operations we began identifying inefficiencies in the way we executed our roles as snipers.

An immediate issue was the multitude of different weapon systems and equipment necessary to carry out our main duty during different phases of missions – as snipers, we were tasked with containing the objective prior to a raid, which meant seeking high ground and containing from the top down providing coverage for the assault force. We used .300 Win mag MK13 sniper rifles, which were cumbersome but effective against enemy personnel. However, it was impossible to assault with these weapons, meaning we had to bag them in rifle packs and use carbines to make our way to high ground – complete with accessories and combat loads of ammunition.

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Our carbines utilized SOPMOD accessories – but on a 16-inch long M4 with a 6-inch picatinny rail, fitting a light, optics, BUI sights, lasers, and pressure pads as well as a universal night sight proved difficult. We had to work out how to overcome this issue, and work out a way to optimize and evolve our equipment to allow us to conduct an offset, assault a target and provide adequate coverage in and around a 300-meter area, even at night.

We began work on optimizing a Designated Marksman Rifle (DMR), chambered in 5.56mm, that not only met but far exceeded these requirements. We purchased and mounted free-floating 15-inch rails, and had the JSOC armor optimized to in order to keep a 75g Hornady round as flat as possible. In testing at Accuracy First in Canadian, Texas, we found the rifle successful at a thousand meters, after deciding on an optic setup that brought the whole package together.

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After extensive testing we had a rifle that gave us a platform allowing us not only to assault, but to effectively engage targets at a distance, at night. This was put to the test on a rooftop in Sadr City in 2007 when my senior and I, a legend in the sniper community named ‘Irish,’ took a shot from a couple of hundred meters out on a maneuvering insurgent after clearing the house. I looked at him, he looked at me and we shook our heads in mutual agreement. Our hard work had paid off.

– Mike Glover
FieldCraft LLC

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A former Special Forces disabled veteran with more than 18 years of military service, Mike has operated at the highest levels of Special Forces. Deploying 15 times to combat theaters, he has served in the following positions: SF Weapons Specialist, SF Sniper, SF Assaulter/Operator, SF Recon Specialist, SF Joint Terminal Air Controller (JTAC), SF Team Sgt, and SF Operations SGM.

Mike is a certified U.S. Government federal firearms instructor, and has also has trained mobility with Team O’Neil Rally School, BSR Racing, and BW drivers courses. He is medically trained every two years in Advanced Medical Trauma and continually maintains his re-certifications for consultation practices.

Considered a Subject Matter Expert (SME) in planning and executing Special Operations in a myriad of complex environments, Mike has taken his 18 years of experience and is giving the American citizen the applicable training tools and training necessary to better protect themselves and their families here and abroad.

Mike has a Bachelors degree in Crisis management and homeland security with American Military University and is pursuing his masters in military history.

Mike currently lives in northern California, where he continues to consult for the U.S. Government in security and firearms instruction.

www.fieldcraftsurvival.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Bravo Company – The Colonel

Thursday, December 1st, 2016

m_thecolonel

Click to view .pdf

Designed by Al and Nico Salvitti with AAR input from multiple Special Operations End Users, The Colonel is a fighting knife, through and through, working around the shooter and utilizing existing muscle memory to produce an effective stabbing and slashing weapon that requires no special training to maintain effectiveness.

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The Colonel is designed to be drawn the same as a handgun, while striking with the blade is the same as throwing a punch. The grip angle, which mirrors that of a pistol, allows The Colonel to sit low in the hand for positive retention.

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The shape of The Colonel’s blade makes it virtually impossible for a user to stab themselves while the blade is in use, something that can happen when fighters employ stabbing motions with other kinds of blades, and miss the target.

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The Colonel Blade is hand forged in Italy with American made G10 grip panels; sharpening and assembly is completed in the US. Each blade is QPPed (Quench Polish Quench), a nitrocarburizing case hardening that increases corrosion and wear resistance. Simply put, The Colonel is designed to be durable and effective.

bravocompanymfg.com/thecolonel

BCM Presents Gunfighter Magazine

Monday, November 7th, 2016

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Hartland, WI – November 1, 2016 BCM is proud to announce the release of BCM Presents Gunfighter™ Magazine, available at stores and on newsstands today.

The BCM Gunfighter Program has supported industry-leading marksmanship and tactical applications instructors since its launch in 2013. Including Pat Rogers, Travis Haley, Pat McNamara, Larry Vickers, Kyle Defoor, Frank Proctor, Zach Harrison, John Chapman and Dave Harrington, the program is a commitment by BCM to connect end users with the best training available in the personal defense and tactics industry today.

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BCM Presents Gunfighter™ Magazine is a platform for these same professionals to speak on a range of topics, from mindset to the practical application of skills in real-world settings. Also featuring articles about the origin of the KeyMod modular rail system, a brief history of weapon systems employed by US Marine Raiders during World War II, the Black Powder Graphic Novel series, the Colonel Blade and a piece on Mission 22’s War at Home Memorial, the publication is a singular destination containing some of the best knowledge and wisdom in the field today.

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Pick up your copy online now at http://www.bravocompanyusa.com/BCMGUNFIGHTER-Magazine-2017-p/gunfighter-magazine-2017.htm

About BCM
BCM (Bravo Company Manufacturing) was founded in 2005 by a veteran United States Marine in Hartland, Wisconsin, where the company maintains its HQ today. BCM builds weapon systems that are manufactured, reinforced and tested to meet the unforgiving needs of law enforcement, military, security and peace keeping professionals in some of the most high stress environments and situations in the world.

Visit BCM online at http://www.BravoCompanyMFG.com

American Gunfighter Episode 6 – Instructor Staff, Northern Red

Wednesday, October 26th, 2016

BCM is proud to present Episode 6 of our original series, American Gunfighter. Episode 6 features Northern Red Instructor Staff and US Army Special Operations Combat Veterans Chris Kovacik and Zach Harrison, discussing the importance of accuracy and discipline in gunfights.

Directed and produced by Jon Chang, American Gunfighter is an ongoing series produced by BCM featuring elite law enforcement and military personnel sharing their thoughts and stories about their profession and craft.

Northern Red is a Private Military Firm specializing in training elite military and law enforcement units for counter terrorism, hostage rescue and close quarter battle missions. The Instructor Staff consists entirely of US Army Special Operations combat veterans with multiple deployments to Iraq and Afghanistan.

BCM (Bravo Company Manufacturing) was founded in 2005 by a veteran United States Marine in Hartland, Wisconsin, where the company maintains its HQ today. BCM builds weapon systems that are manufactured, reinforced and tested to meet the unforgiving needs of law enforcement, military, security and peace keeping professionals in some of the most high stress environments and situations in the world.

bravocompanymfg.com/american_gunfighter

BCM Remembers Pat Rogers

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

As many of you have heard Marine Veteran and former NYPD Detective Pat Rogers passed away last night from natural causes. His name is well known in Tactical Training circles where he continued to serve for several decades. BCM owner Paul Buffoni shared this touching tribute to his friend Pat.

He will be missed. May he rest in peace.

It is with the heaviest of hearts that I announce the passing of my Brother and my friend Pat Rogers.


Pat embodied the warrior spirit. And like all great warriors he had a big heart and it was full of love. Love for his country, love for his Brothers, and love for his family and friends.

We are definitely diminished and I will miss him greatly.

I will miss his energy. Pat would bring energy to every room he walked in with his magnetic personality. Folks would just gravitate toward him. They would come to hear a colorful story told in a way only Pat could tell, or maybe to hear a lesson from his lifetime of experience in the USMC, NYPD, or any number of his other billets. I have lost track of how many times his enthusiasm and stories would keep everyone in stiches. I have lost track of how many lessons he has taught me.

I will miss his passion. “Life is good.” Countless times he would say that to me. Whether we were at the range together in one of his classes, or on the phone when he was talking about some place Ellen and him visited together, or giving me an AAR of the last class he just finished teaching… he would close with “Life is good”. And he meant it. He made you feel better about your day just from hearing how much he enjoyed his. Pat loved life, every day of it.

I will miss his friendship. Good times or bad times Pat would always be the one to reach out to you. Whether it was to celebrate with you or lend a helping hand, he would be there. If a man is known by the company he keeps it becomes easy to see why so many loved Pat. I have been so very fortunate to meet many of Pat’s good friends and honored to call them mine as well. You would be hard pressed to find a group of higher quality individuals with the same sense of integrity, loyalty, and love that Pat displayed. A testament to our friend Pat. It has been said that- Friends are the siblings God never gave us.

I will miss my Brother.

We were recently working on a project together and I needed an expanded bio. I am going to include it here.

Semper Fidelis my Brother,
Paul Buffoni
Bravo Company

About Pat Rogers

Pat was born in Brooklyn NY in 1946.
He has worked shining shoes; delivering newspapers; pumping gas; working on a ride in Coney Island; driving a taxi; a sport parachute instructor, a photographer, and for an airline company that serviced the Far East.

He served in the active and reserve components as a United States Marine starting in 1963.
He served in the former Republic of Vietnam with 3rd Marine Division.
He was an 1811 Tank Crewman; 0311 Rifleman; 0369 Infantry Unit Leader; 8531 Primary Marksmanship Instructor; 8662 Parachutist; 5702 NBC Specialist; 5702 NBC Officer.
He served for 5 years in the Foreign Material Acquisition Exploitation Unit, and finished as Chief Warrant Officer 2.

He was a NYC Correction Officer; a NYC Police Officer, serving in Patrol; Street Narcotics Enforcement Unit; Anti-Crime; investigator in Manhattan Robbery Squad, Central Robbery Division.
As a Sgt he served in Patrol; Anti-Crime; in the Chief of Detectives Office; as a supervisor in the Technical Assistance Response Unit, and as a Hostage Negotiator.
He was decorated 54 times, to include the Medal of Valor.
He worked as an IC with the Counter Terrorism Center of OGA.
He was an SME evaluating the DOS Anti-Terrorist Assistance Program.
He was a Rangemaster at Gunsite for 12 years.

He been the principal at EAG since 1989.


He was the 464th person in the US to accrue 1000 Free Fall Parachute Jumps (USPA Gold Wings #464), the 203rd to accrue over 2000 Free Fall Parachute Jumps (USPA Diamond Wings #203) and the 131st person in the US to accrue over 12 hours in freefall (USPA Gold Free Fall Badge # 131)

He is an NRA High Master Rifle, and CMP Distinguished Rifleman.

He learns something new every day.