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Posts Tagged ‘Dueck Defense’

SureFire Field Notes Ep. 16, Positional Shooting with Barry Dueck

Wednesday, November 29th, 2017

In this episode, Barry Dueck discusses methods for supported and unsupported positional shooting.

Barry Dueck is a former Marine, owner of Dueck Defense Inc, champion competitive shooter and VP of Suppressors and Weapons at SureFire LLC. Barry is also the architect of SureFire’s SOCOM suppressors, winner of the most rigorous and extensive suppressor evaluation in history. Barry’s knowledge comes from his military experience, expertise in the firearms industry as a designer, and also from being a 3-Gun Champion, IPSC Grandmaster and USA Team World Shoot gold medalist.

www.surefire.com

Dueck Defense – Red Dot Back Up Sight Base

Monday, June 27th, 2016

Barry Dueck designed the Red Dot Back Up Sight Base as a simple means to incorprate an RDS on to a pistol without going to a gunsmith. The mount slides into the rear sight dovetail.


FEATURES:
• CNC Machined in the USA from US Mill certified bar stock
• Nitride coated giving a super hard matte black surface finish that is highly corrosion resistant even in salt water environments
• Uses factory rear sight dovetail. No modification to your gun
• Optimal mounting height to clear Suppressors
• Compatible with most open top and red dot tactical holsters
• MADE IN THE USA

Next, Dueck Defense is introducing a version for the S&W M&P as seen in this photo by @kotactical on Instagram.

dueckdefense.com/shop/firearms/red-dot-back-up-sight-base-rbu

Meet “The Grunt” From EraThr3

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

The Scenario
Last month I spent a few days with Buck Doyle of Follow Through Consulting in Utah courtesy of PROOF Research. During his Scoped Carbine Course we used rifles provided by EraThr3 which featured PROOF Research carbon fiber barrels. They were outfitted with SureFire WarComps and suppressors along with Leupold Mark 6 3-18×44 scopes with the Tremor3 reticle and Mark 6 IMS mounts. Barry Dueck also brought sets of his Rapid Transition Sights for each rifle which offers M16A2-style front and rear sights at a 45 deg offset. I use the RTS on my telescopic sight equipped 7.62 gas gun and they are great for taking those close in shots. At Buck’s course it was no different, and I used them quite often in different scenarios.

We fired Hornady 55 and 75 grain Superformance Match cartridges in 5.56mm during the course, depending on whether the rifle was suppressed or not. During shots out past 500m, we relied solely on the 75 grain rounds. This whole combination allowed participants to effectively engage targets out to 1164 yards. This course and firearm setup really increased my confidence in the ability of 5.56mm to reach out and hit targets past 1000 yards. To be sure, there are better rounds available for those distances and we had to use some pretty serious holds to hit out that far, but it’s just something I’d never done before as I consider targets past 600 yards as beyond the application of the 5.56 round.

A Proof-of-Concept Carbine
EraThr3 provided a new proof-of-concept rifle configuration for the course participants which they plan to place into production as, “The Grunt”. They decided upon the design and built them in a matter of weeks but the upper and lowers were cut specifically for this new gun. You may notice that there is no cutout on the upper for the boltcatch. Instead, they milled material from the reverse of the catch in order to give it enough room for operation. Additionally, the ejection port cover pin is captive so there’s no retaining ring. This is also the first time EraThr3 has incorporated a forward assist on a carbine.

Overall, it’s a very lightweight rifle, but an expensive one. These rifles would retail for over $10k with half of that price going to the glass alone, which also added some heft to these otherwise very lightweight rifles. Of course, we wouldn’t have been hitting targets at those ranges without the optics. I know some are going to say that this is one expensive rifle. Yes, it is. Although many folks won’t be able to afford it, EraThr3 is okay with that.

The Parts
They were very open about the rifle’s components and were more than happy to provide links to the parts where available. Although EraThr3 may substitute some items for production versions of “The Grunt”, the rifles we fired in Utah included the following components:

-16″ Proof Research Carbon Fiber 5.56mm barrel, 1:7 twist.
Surefire WARCOMP 556 Muzzle Device
-New E3 Billet upper receiver, with forward assist, Hidden dust cover rod, and more rigid design than its’ counterpart, “Project Anorexia” released last year.
-New E3 Skeletonized Lower Receiver with improved features such as a matched grip profile, elimination of roll pin, hidden duct cover rod, and more robust lines.
-New E3 14″ M-LOK Handguard with full length skeletonized picatinny top rail.
Titanium Bolt Carrier
Properly Headspaced JP Enhanced Bolt
V7 Lightweight Portdoor
V7 Portdoor Rod
-New Titanium EraThr3 Forward Assist
AXTS Raptor Charging Handle
AXTS Talon Ambi Safety
AR Gold drop in Trigger
-Titanium Takedown pins/mag-catch
Ultra Light Bolt Catch
PWS Enhanced Buffer Tube/ratchet design end plate & castle nut
PWS Mod 2 H2 Buffer at 4.5oz
-Magpul STR Stock & MIAD Grip
Atlas V8 Bipod or FALKOR DEFENSE MANTIS depending on rifle issued
Dueck Defense Rapid Transition Sights

The Grunt
EraThr3’s Sheri Johnson had this to say about the guns, “These 12 rifles were built with a grip of hand selected parts and accessories, some of which being new to us, and provided just for the event in Utah. As a grassroots, custom rifle manufacturer, we’re not married to a specific line of goods or accessories. Maintaining the ability to reach across the table, work with most everybody in the industry, and configure a handful of rifles for an event like this is what we’re all about. There’s always risk in the unknown, yet that seems to be where we’re most comfortable. There was most definitely plenty of that when we committed to putting on a show in the mountains of Utah. Win, lose, or bust, you can bank on the idea that we’re always out to test the limits, regardless of the venue.”

I asked about how the production version of “The Grunt” will be rolled out and EraThr3 CEO Stirling Becklin related this to SSD, “Our objective with the Grunt is to address those end-users who aspire to have the most refined, yet rugged rifle available, and we acknowledge that this limits our customer base to a small fraction of the industry’s make-up. All the better, and we’re proud to be in a class of our own. The Grunt will be available at two price-points, one with a carbon barrel, Ti parts, etc., and another being a sub $3k model with a more standard bill of materials, including a single-point cut 416R stainless barrel, but maintaining the same level of accuracy and attention to detail.”

What’s Up With Those Colors?
The rifles we used at the course were offered in a variety of vibrant colors and Sheri did play a trick on me, initially pairing me with a pink rifle. She told me that the colors were inspired by a box of crayons and sure enough, she included a pack in each rifle case along with a bag of Skittles.

She said, “Production rifles probably aren’t going to ship with a bag of candy, but you never know how things may just stick.” Turns out, the Gray tone on the rifle I used for the event is kind of their trademark color, and is more likely a standard color than any of the others that showed up on Buck’s range.

But Does It Shoot?
Whenever you write about a gun, people obviously want to know if it can shoot. At least with carbines, generally they all do and in this case, yes, it does. At this point in the game, Stoner-style rifles aren’t exactly rocket science and EraThr3 has already been building them for several years. Virtually no expense was spared. Take one look at the rifle’s components and you see that it’s going to work unless they don’t know how to put them together. Like I already said, EraThr3 does.

No torture tests were run on the guns we shot and we didn’t go downrange and measure shotgroups. This was a course on long range gunfighting, like a service member might encounter in Afghanistan; shooting from one ridgeline to another. Once they were zeroed, hits were the evidence of the weapon’s fidelity. The guns worked well. Rather than the weapon, it was the environment we had to contend with for those hits. Temperature swings and shifting winds tested our ability to compensate and the high altitude of the range location drained our bodies. Despite this, the rifle didn’t let me down.

However, I’ll give it all to you; the good, the bad and the ugly. I did have two ammo related malfunctions. No biggie, I applied immediate action, and went right back to it. But this wasn’t like shooting a typical long range course of fire. Although we used 20 rd PMags, we went through a lot of ammunition, engaging targets both near and far.

Additionally, EraThr3 did an awesome job mounting the SureFire WarComps on the PROOF Barrel blanks. The timing was perfect; threaded right on with no need for crush washers. However, they had to learn a thing or two from SureFire about mounting the WarComp to ensure that it would offer correct alignment for a suppressor. Consequently, not every rifle was equipped with a suppressor during the event lest we risk a baffle strike. This stuff happens, and I’d say it had a lot to do with how quickly they built these rifles.

In the end, neither one of these issues detracted from my experience. My goal for attending this event was to see if I could effectively engage targets past 1000 yards with a 5.56mm rifle and with this combination of rifle, optics and ammunition, I could. Mission accomplished.

What’s Next?
As I understand it, most of the rifles we used on the course are going to put up for sale at a discount to benefit some USMC charities in honor of Buck Doyle’s service. I’ll post details as soon as I get them but I can tell you, they’ll go fast.

EraThr3 on Erathr3
I had a great time in Utah and got to do some really fun shooting. This was also the first time I had met anyone from EraThr3 but I think this note they sent me sums them up best, “Call us boutique, niche, crazy, or whatever else makes it easy to recognize our inability to conform to the masses. Truth is, we’re just a handful of misfits out to make our own luck and do what makes us happy. It’s what started the madness, and is sure to drive us into the future.”

Shout out to DEFCON Group for the images!

Dueck Defense – Red Dot Backup Sight Base

Sunday, September 27th, 2015

Barry Dueck has done it again, introducing a new Sight Base for Red Dots with integrated backup sights. It’s a very straight forward design, made from bar stock and nitride coated. A major advantage is that it is tall enough to clear most suppressors and there are no modifications required to your slide.  It mounts in the factory rear sight dovetail.

 

“I designed the RBU as a simple no gunsmithing sight base to eliminate lost dots when aiming. Just align the fixed iron sights and your red dot is visible. It’s simple and it works.”
-Barry Dueck

 

dueckdefense.com/shop/firearms/red-dot-back-up-sight-base

Dueck Defense Rapid Transition Sights Available In Three Flavors

Monday, February 16th, 2015

Designed by Barry Dueck and available through SureFire, the Rapid Transition Sights are now available in three different configurations.

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Based in the M16A2 rear and front sight pair, the RTS mount to a Picatinny rail. They present at a 45 degree angle so that you can roll off of your telescopic optic to use the RTS as a backup sight or for close in targets.

In addition to the original model, there is a version with tritium inserts as well as a fiber optic insert. The tritium version incorporates a larger dot at the front sight and two smaller tritium dots on rear sight for easy alignment in low-light conditions. The fiber optic model includes front sight in red, green, or yellow.

www.surefire.com/tactical-equipment/rapid-transition-sights

Viral marketing keeps getting better and better

Sunday, December 15th, 2013

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www.DueckDefense.com

Thank You For Your Hospitality SureFire & 5.11 Tactical

Monday, December 9th, 2013

I’d like to personally express my thanks for last week’s outstanding writers event hosted by SureFire and 5.11 Tactical. It was extremely well organized and I appreciate the opportunity to see behind the curtain. I’d particularly like to call out Mike Voigt and Barry Dueck as well as Danny P for their instructional skills.

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I’d also like to mention the additional sponsors: Aimpoint, Dueck Defense, Firebase Combat Studies Group, Hornady, Lewis Machine & Tool, Mystery Ranch, Pitbull Tactical, Safariland, and Zev Technologies. The event would not have been possible without your support.

Finally, thanks to Leah, Tom and Garin for herding us cats and putting up with our incessant attempts to derail your marketing plans. Dave R, the insight into 5.11 was quite eye opening. You guys have assembled quite a team.

Dueck Defense Debuts New Sights at SureFire Writer’s Event

Friday, December 6th, 2013

Dueck Defense unveiled their new as-yet-unnamed sight for GLOCKs at this week’s SureFire Writer’s Event. It features a wide, rear sight with a smooth rack notch that easily catches on belts, pants or holsters when you want it to but doesn’t have sharp edges that catch on everything you pass by or cut you up. I can attest to the design. I was able to rack the slide one handed by catching the rear sight on my gear during drills but it never caught on anything even when I was wearing a hoodie.

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The rear sight notch is .145″ wide x .120″ deep with a front sight width of .115″. This leaves to columns of .015″ worth of daylight on either side of the front sight. Front man Barry Dueck explained that his experience is that the wider rear sight is a bit more forgiving as the contrast of the light helps the brain center the sight. Narrower rear sight notches can result in little contrast and slower sight alignment.

Production models will be Melonite coated but these pre-production samples were blued in order to get them on the guns in time for the event. You also may notice that the front sight isn’t serrated. Dueck explained that coated serrations wear off over time on the high points. In the long run, you end up constantly coating them in order to reduce shine.

According to Dueck, this new sight will be offered with different front sight options. I was able to use the fiber optic insert variant as well as the standard Black front sight but there is also a Tritium variant. Look for availability in the next 6-8 weeks.