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Posts Tagged ‘Greyhive’

Greyhive Snapshot – Drew Estell

Saturday, February 24th, 2018

How Do You Scan and Identify Targets?

How do we properly scan? We’ve all the seen people on the range that keep their eyes in their sights and move their weapon from left to right as a habit. While it looks good and they are checking the block on performing this critical task, sometimes those people aren’t actually identifying anything and are setting themselves up for failure.

If you keep your eyes in your sight while scanning, you are limiting yourself to what is within that toilet paper tube sized housing. With some sights, this is even smaller. As much as we train to go into broad target focus with the sight in line with our eyes, having it there will inevitably pull you back into what’s only visible from that housing. On top of this, red dot is already on your target.

We put our sights on target thousands of times and pull the trigger. Do you think anything will be different when you have to discriminate between a threat and a non-threat? Your brain has been wired to see a red dot or sights on target and pull the trigger. How about when other good guys have a weapon like a police officer responding to a call? Give yourself the time and space necessary to properly identify those around you in an actual situation. By lowering the weapon slightly so that the sights are not immediately visible and on your target, you are creating the amount of time and space necessary for your brain to identify the target, and potentially tell your firing hand not to pull the trigger if needed. I would want that split second extra to determine if what was in the suspect’s hand was a cell phone, an unidentified person holding a badge, or the shape in the middle of the night was actually my wife who accidently tripped over my gym bag while she was checking on the kiddo. There’s a lot of situations that this could be important, I’m sure you can think of several and add it to the comments below.

A good rule of thumb with a rifle is to be able to turn your chin over your buttstock. With a pistol, lower the gun down to your upper chest or break it back enough to be able to see the torso area of those around you. Hands aren’t always above the shoulder line to determine if they have a gun, and badges aren’t always high on the chest to easily see. When you have your weapon pressed out in your line of sight, you are effectively cutting off the majority or the torso that gives us the ability to identify what we need, get a snapshot of the person, and proceed into our “snapshot… hands, aim, shoot” process of target identification.

Scan with your eyes and actually identify the targets to your left and right of your area. ID target, engage until target begins to go down, gun down, eyes lead gun, and snap onto next target if required. Use your eyes to gather information and determine whether or not you will give commands or engage depending on your situation. You can only shoot as fast as you can see, and you can only make decision as fast as you can process information. Don’t limit yourself on either, or set yourself up for failure.

thumbnail Drew Estell is the owner of BAER Solutions, and served for a decade in Special Operations. He has been fortunate enough to serve with soldiers and instructors who were invested in his success, and as such have benefited from the years of experience that each of them had. During the course of his multiple combat deployments and experiences, he has learned that no shooter is the same.

In addition to weapons training classes, BAER Solutions offers leadership and team building consultations. BAER Solutions also works with police departments to take lessons learned from SOF deployments and apply them to the specific needs of the local governance and populace. By combining SOF tenets of Village Stability Operations and the concept of Community Policing, they deliver a consulting and training package called Unconventional Policing.

For more information this topic, create your free account at Greyhive and subscribe to our YouTube channel to watch the pistol ready position videos demonstrating this.

Snapshot is a bi-weekly series from Greyhive featuring content written by our Experts. It is our goal to deliver information that prompts you to examine your preparedness from all angles, not just how quickly and accurately you shoot.

Greyhive Snapshot – Ian Strimbeck

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

It’s Called a GunFIGHT for a Reason

We all have that one friend, or have encountered that one individual, who lacks the intellectual capacity to understand that pressing the trigger is just one tiny aspect of owning a gun. When it comes to handguns, how often do most of us drive the gun out to extension every time we go to the range? How many of us think about how often we’re in close quarters with multiple individuals on a day to day basis? The length of extension of our pistol correlates directly to the proximity of the threat we’re dealing with. To solidify the idea in our head that we’ll always have enough distance between our pistol and the threat is not only foolish but reckless as well.

Criminals don’t care about how you train or your range safety protocols. All they care about is completing their mission, whether that be taking your wallet or your life for that matter. Most criminal assaults occur after an ambush and the victim ends up “locking up” in a standing entanglement with the assailant. But the victim can just go for his gun now right? Wrong. That would be a recipe for failure. But why? Can’t I just shove the guy with my off hand and pull my gun out like Wyatt Earp? This is what I commonly see being thought of as a quality method for retention based shooting. Usually it’s because of the misinformation out there from social media entertainers. A rubber dummy or cardboard target doesn’t fight back. It doesn’t give pressure back. It doesn’t have limbs that will attempt to strip your gun away. And it definitely doesn’t have a will to continue the fight after you’ve already given up on yourself.

At the end of the day, think realistically as to how to approach the way you train. Steer clear of attempting to copy uncontextualized methods of entangled handgun employment. Get to a quality class that utilizes pressure based training to truly test the skills. It will be anything but easy, but to truly grow your skillset you must constantly put yourself in places of conflict.

strimbeckIan Strimbeck is a United States Marine Corps veteran and founder of Runenation LLC. Runenation is a consulting and education company specializing in the constant growth of the multidisciplinary tactician. Too often in the “gun world,” you see individuals who are drawn to a singular tool in lieu of looking at the bigger picture. It isn’t solely about the gun, blade, grappling, striking, medical, fitness, or verbal acuity. It’s a constantly evolving skillset that you put a varying amount of effort into throughout your life. Like the rings on a tree trunk , it will grow as long as you put in the necessary effort.

greyhive.com/articles

Snapshot is a bi-weekly series from Greyhive featuring content written by our Experts. It is our goal to deliver information that prompts you to examine your preparedness from all angles, not just how quickly and accurately you shoot.

Greyhive Training Brief, Episodes 2 and 3

Saturday, November 18th, 2017

The Training Brief is a weekly video series released every Wednesday on the Greyhive website and YouTube channel. The episodes feature various Greyhive Experts and SMEs who cover a broad spectrum of topics ranging from mental performance to specific shooting and tactics elements. Each episode is 5 to 8 minutes and contains narrowly focused content.

The goal of the Training Brief videos is to deliver knowledge to our community that is relevant, actionable and cerebral.

Episodes 2 and 3: Mental Performance

Dr. Seth Haselhuhn, SOCOM Mental Performance Coach, discusses training and the mental performance aspects that determine each shooter’s success with Drew Estell of BAER Solutions. This is a multi-part series that covers many topics within mental performance and the psychology of successful shooters.

Seth Haselhuhn, Ph.D.
Doc has been working with SOF units for several years and has been instrumental in improving the shooting, decision-making, training, and overall performance of soldiers on and off the battlefield.

Drew Estell
SOF Veteran specializing in training shooters in rifle and pistol by giving the why and how, not just leading students through drills. Individual shooters, individual solutions.

To access all Training Brief videos and additional free articles, go to Greyhive.

Greyhive Training Brief, Episode 1

Saturday, November 4th, 2017

The Training Brief is a weekly video series released every Wednesday on the Greyhive website and YouTube channel. The episodes feature various Greyhive Experts and SMEs who cover a broad spectrum of topics ranging from mental performance to specific shooting and tactics elements. Each episode is 5 to 8 minutes and contains narrowly focused content.

The goal of the Training Brief videos is to deliver knowledge to our community that is relevant, actionable and cerebral.

Episode 1 – Spalling
Garett Schwindel of Kägwerks explains the effects of spalling and use of cover examples with Drew Estell of BAER Solutions.

To access additional training articles and content, go to Greyhive.

Whiskey 5 – Greyhive

Saturday, October 28th, 2017

Who

Greyhive is a media company founded by a Special Operations veteran and a former law enforcement officer. Greyhive’s web application, greyhive.com, is the premier online destination for civilians, first responders and military personnel to access trusted firearms and tactics training content.

Greyhive is a cooperative enterprise built upon a community of like-minded professionals Greyhive calls its “Experts”. All Experts are vetted by their peers, are highly regarded in their specified fields of expertise and have chosen to join the Greyhive community where they create, consolidate and deliver free training videos and articles. They possess decades of experience (active, retired and former military and law enforcement, competitive shooting, strength and conditioning, sports psychology, combatives, survival), but perhaps more importantly, Greyhive Experts possess a common passion: To lead, teach, influence and engage with individuals committed to their own professional and personal development.

What

Greyhive is a community where civilians, public safety professionals and military personnel go to access vetted, trusted and relevant online tactical and firearms training content. Greyhive.com consolidates industry-leading instructors, subject matter experts and training companies and delivers free articles and videos created by its “Experts”. The featured free content is Greyhive’s ‘Training Brief’ video series. The Training Brief series covers a broad spectrum of topics, but each video segment is delivered in a concise and narrowly focused format.

Greyhive is built to strengthen the bond of the men and women who invest their time, money, and hard work into their training. Whether you’re a responsibly armed citizen, law enforcement, or military personnel, Greyhive provides the knowledge that fuels the professional growth and development needed to accomplish your mission and meet your intent. Greyhive is a resource for like-minded individuals committed to defending themselves, their families, their communities and their country.

Where

Greyhive is based in Nashville, TN.

When

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Greyhive was founded in December 2016 and launched greyhive.com in October 2017. The first segment of the Training Brief video series will be released in November and Greyhive will begin delivering premium, subscription-based training content through its proprietary Team Room Platform in early 2018.

Why

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Greyhive has identified two significant gaps in the current firearms and tactical training continuum:

(1) There are no community-based sustainment or follow-on training solutions available to support professional, 1-to-1 online interaction between instructors and students;

(2) Instructors possess valuable subject matter expertise and highly sought-after training assets, but have no efficient way to control the dissemination of these assets online.

Follow-On Training. Students invest in attending training classes delivered by their instructors of choice. After the class ends, they have no way to continue training with the guidance and feedback from their instructors. This makes it difficult for the students to continue honing their skills and growing professionally. Without Greyhive, options for student-to-instructor interaction are too broad, too spread out, and not personal enough to get any meaningful feedback that is value added to their development. Students, as well as instructors, need a means of providing feedback, a professional community that encourages interaction and development, and a way to gain diagnostic feedback between attending classes.

Because training doesn’t end when you walk off the range.

www.greyhive.com