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Posts Tagged ‘Jeff Gonzales’

The Range At Austin – Gunfighter Club

Wednesday, December 21st, 2016


The primary purpose behind the GUNFIGHTER Club is helping students sustain their skills. The secondary purpose is providing a gateway for improving their skills. Whether you need to brush up, or invest time at building a solid foundation this program is an excellent balance of value and performance.

The GUNFIGHTER Club gives access to all training classes put on by the Range at Austin for a low monthly fee of $225.00. The monthly fee will give you access to 16 hours per month of training.

What else do you get for being a part of GUNFIGHTER Club; access and opportunity. You will have access to participate in our staff’s monthly 2-hour Professional Development or PRODEV sessions commensurate with your skill level. In addition, the opportunity to try new courses of fire, drill of the day and concealment league scenarios.

The goal for the GUNFIGHTER Club is to sustain skills we know to be perishable, but also to improve upon them and that takes hard work. I have struggled over the years recognizing the limitations to training opportunities and the frequencies of training. It is my intention to shatter these barriers that prevent folks from reaching their goals.

The monthly fee does not include ammunition, rentals or supporting equipment and cannot be used in conjunction with any sales or specials to include our guest instructors. The first 3 months must be paid in advance to join with monthly payments beginning after and no rollover for training hours.

For more information or to secure your spot please feel free to contact me at jeffg@therangeaustin.com
V/R,

Jeff Gonzales
Director of Training
The Range at Austin

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, November 12th, 2016

Intermediate Positions

Recently I had the privilege of attending my good friend Pat Roger’s memorial weekend hosted by the Alliance PD to provide some blocks of instruction on the rifle and one of my favorite rifle drills.

Priorities

While getting setup for the rifle drill we spent time reviewing positions and specifically the kneeling position. I love a good kneeling position, but I am surprised by how little work most people put into the positions. First, this is how we look at any of the positions for use on a battlefield, they are designed to help take advantage of available cover. Kneeling is a great intermediate position, high enough to shoot over some taller oddities and low enough to get under some. The mistake people make is thinking a kneeling position is there to increase your accuracy. It is not, it is there to take advantage of cover first and if possible improve your shooting your position second.

Stable shooting platform

Since we focus more on the cover aspect we have to rely on good technique to improve our marksmanship. There are so many different forms of kneeling out there, but don’t get hung up on whether it is a double knee, high knee, speed knee or some other crazy kneeling position. The body is still broken down into two parts, the upper and lower units. So many focus only on the lower unit, how they are kneeling and forget to work their upper unit. Truthfully, it doesn’t matter what type of kneeling position you use as long as you can take advantage of the cover you are trying to use and are stable enough to get your hits on target.

Pulling power

The key to the kneeling position has to do with your upper torso. Most folks just “hold” the weapon in their shoulder pocket. You need to pull the weapon into your pocket and not with just your arms. You need to engage the muscular chain of the upper back region. All those large and intimidating muscles that have tremendous pulling power compared to your wimpy arms. Let’s face it, if all you have to work the rifle is your arms you are missing out, now image recruiting the larger muscle groups to see the range of your effectiveness.

Muscle recruitment

Through years of frolicking about we discovered the benefits of muscle recruitment as it relates to shooting, it is hard to find a better example than kneeling. While you might be able to assume a stable lower unit on the flat range, the battlefield is less forgiving. As long as you are balanced and won’t fall over, you need to concentrate on retractor your shoulder blades, almost pinching them as if you are holding an object between them. That is were you see the stability you need to make hits at the extended ranges. While most folks don’t play with the kneeing at extended ranges you may not have a say in your gunfight. If you have to hit a target at 75, 100 even 200 yards while taking advantage of cover you may have to rely on technique alone.

You can opt to employ other techniques such as resting on objects, sling use or even aftermarket devices to help with recoil, but those are not a replacement for skill. I have seen folks engage targets well outside the normal range, they did so because they took what God gave them and exploited it on the battlefield.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Jeff Gonzales Named Director of Training for The Range at Austin

Monday, July 25th, 2016

Decorated US Navy SEAL and renowned instructor joins premier shooting facility.


AUSTIN, TX – The Range at Austin is pleased to announce the hiring of Jeff Gonzales. Jeff will serve as Director of Training for the facility’s instructional and educational courses. Jeff will bring his years of experience, lessons learned and NSW mindset to The Range at Austin and its education programs. He will oversee a diverse curriculum ranging from firearm safety classes to concealed handgun certification and advanced tactical training.

Jeff is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who served as an operator and instructor participating in numerous combat operations around the world. Jeff serves as President to Trident Concepts, a Texas-based company specializing in personal protection tactics, techniques and procedures for armed and unarmed conflicts. “I’m extremely excited to take the helm at this amazing facility,” stated Jeff. “I look forward to the challenges of firearms training and education.”

“Jeff will be a tremendous asset to The Range at Austin, designing and implementing exceptional curriculum and education courses for our customers in Texas and beyond,” stated Grant Shaw, Managing Partner for The Range at Austin. “Jeff will be hard at work in the coming weeks developing a training and education program unmatched by most facilities.”

The facility is scheduled to open in fall of 2016.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, June 18th, 2016

Bringing nothing to a gunfight

How much thought have you given to carrying personal protection tools other than a firearm? With the rampant increase in “gun free” zones are you still able to effectively and quickly protect yourself and loved ones.

Be prepared

Often times we get wrapped around the axle whether we can or cannot carry a gun. The subject of gun free zones is not relevant to this article, at some point we will all be in what I prefer to reference as “victim rich zones” or VRZ. The real question is what do you have available and have you trained for this contingency. I think it is foolish avoiding this subject, it is inevitable not to mention the consequences for breaking the law can be far more severe. While I recognize it is a personal choice, make sure you have weighed the options as well as consequences.

Think outside the box

In our Concealed Carry classes we talk about a threat matrix. This matrix is a breakdown of your perceived threat level as well as various loadouts. I ask all students to think long and hard into how you would effectively manage each of the blocks reminding them some blocks may not have any weapons at all. This exercise is incredibly helpful at addressing what to do when you must navigate a VRZ. The difficult part of many is recognizing the firearm free blocks. It sometimes is helpful to provide scenarios to this firearm free blocks such as going to the pool, boarding an airplane or visiting your children’s school. Even if you are permitted to carry in these locations now, recognize at some point you might not and better to acknowledge that notion now rather than later.

Create time and space

I find a firearm in the right hands to be incredibly effective at dealing with lethal threats. That should come as no surprise, but why is it effective? A major reason is it has the capability to launch multiple ballistic projectiles at varying distances. The key word is distances, in some cases you may not have access to your firearm even if it was permissible to carry so developing a layered defensive approach is sound. This approach can be scaled up or if necessary scaled down, but there is two more thoughts to consider here; metallic versus nonmetallic is one and whether you are subject to a physical search the other.

Plastic fantastic

Part of your threat matrix should include both metallic and nonmetallic weapons. If you cannot carry a firearm then you scale down to your next best options such as edged weapons, impact weapons, maybe chemical deterrents, stun guns and tasers should be considered. If you must navigate these VRZ’s frequently then suitable replacements must be explored and practiced with the same frequency as your firearms training. If you have to navigate these locations infrequently then scaling down is the better idea. On the nonmetallic side you may want to consider high impact plastic replacements for your normal array of edged and impact weapons. While these may lack some effectiveness as their metallic kin they will more than likely be adequate when you need them and can easily be replaced.

The black ops feel

If you must subject yourself to a physical search then stop and ask yourself is it really worth it for the simple reason your options are severely limited. However, there are still plenty to consider along with their covert method of carry and deployment. To me this is one of the most overlooked subjects within the concealed carry field. Carrying with no residual presence of any weapons. These types of options are available, but at a cost. Aside from the potential legal consequences the deeper the concealment the more difficult it will be to access; which puts even more emphasis on training.

Clothing attire, weapon selection and immediate actions to buy you time and distance to deploy your deep concealment options are becoming more and more relevant in our urban setting. This is were the art form of concealing really gets interesting.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

By now most of us are probably sick of hearing or seeing posts about the recent negligent discharge. Surprised or not, safety is the top priority in any high risk training evolution.

It’s high risk for a reason

I don’t feel the need to regurgitate the incident, suffice it to say it was pretty stupid and I’m glad no one was hurt. The other day I was catching up with my good friend Pat Rogers and we were discussing the subject of negligent discharges. It is a very real possibility in firearms training classes and as instructors we have an obligation to ensure the safest training environment possible. Incidents like the one mentioned above are preventable by avoiding stupid behavior. The hard part is when your instructor is exhibiting the stupid behavior…ugh. My sincere hope is folks can look at this incident and see it for what it is, reckless and unnecessary. Learn from it and move on, focus on proper behavior during high risk training.

Set expectations early and often

Let’s pretend we live in a world where stupid shit like this doesn’t happen, or at least too often. As an instructor I set the tone early on for the expectations I have for our students while in class. It is clear and consistent from class to class because it is part of our programming and I hope it becomes a part of theirs once they leave. I truly believe if you hold your students to a higher standard, they will work tirelessly to meet the standard. From there we evaluate all training to determine it’s level of risk as well as ways to mitigate those risks. Sometimes, it means eliminating the risk completely as the best course of action. Next, we try to use redundant safety features where possible to minimize the known risks and even mitigate unknown risks that may pop up at times.

Begin with the end in mind

Safety briefing should be conducted and questions asked to ensure everyone knows their responsibility and what to do if the worse case should happen along with appropriate medical gear readily available. This type of training has inherent risks so creating a pre-mishap plan will help to expedite things should they go sideways. When a safety violation is committed it is important to deal with it at that moment and as a class. I can promise you, there are probably more of the same safety violations being committed and you are just not seeing them. So, it benefits explaining and addressing the situation as a group. If the same safety violation is committed by multiple students you need to evaluate your methods and your delivery of expectations as they are probably being overlooked.

Model behavior

As a student the best thing you can do is pay attention, pay attention to the details. I will be brutally honest; you cannot multi-task. If the instructor is briefing, listen! Don’t be loading magazines, trying to replicate the movements or wondering what’s for dinner. Stay focused during those moments and if you are unsure of what is expected ask for clarification. The worse possible thing you can do is try to argue over safety. The fastest way to be shown the door is when you try to save face or deny any wrong doing so own up to it if you make a mistake. The last thing I would add is look out for one another, don’t let someone do something dumb on the range because they are not paying attention or had a brain fart. Each class has the opportunity for failures, but also successes because we are helping one another. These are but a few considerations regarding safety, but it seems with the current incidents we have had it might be a good time to review them.

Safety is free; pay attention, know what you are doing and ask questions when unclear.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, January 16th, 2016

Going fast and being accurate are not mutually exclusive. Everyone likes to think so, but they are independent skill sets.

Assumptions…

Marksmanship fundamentals are one of the most talked about subjects, but most misunderstood. Being a marksman means you hit what you are aiming at on command. The moment speed comes into the equation many folks have difficulty because their marksmanship fundamentals are lacking. We make certain assumptions in our Concealed Carry class, assumptions based on marksmanship prerequisites. We are not there to teach them as much as apply them under concealed conditions.

The reluctant truth

What I am discovering is fundamentals are lacking more than I might like to admit. Then I’m forced to acknowledge we either do something about it or allow countless rounds to go downrange reinforcing bad habits. I choose to do something about it so in a sense we have to “lift lite to lift heavy”. What I mean is simply focusing on fundamentals from both a knowledge and application point of view. You have to have the knowledge of sight management, trigger management and follow through. These are the known and non-negotiable concepts for marksmanship. We have started to cover the fundamentals in every class in an effort to break the cycle.

It’s all in the technique

I love lifting philosophies and the one I mentioned above is a great example. The way we interpret it is you may want to lift the heavy weight, but you probably should lighten the bar and focus on your technique so you can eventually lift heavier. So how do we lighten the bar when it comes to shooting. We slow down, but slowing down is not the best way to describe the process. Instead what you need to do is perform each of the movements and actions at a speed you can execute them flawlessly. The tough part is forcing folks to go slow enough so we borrow a drill from the lifting world called a “tempo” drill.

Precise micro tasks

Nothing fancy about this, each action of firing a shot has a prescribed time limit or tempo you are to perform it within. A good example is the drawstroke, we ask the students to take 4 seconds to come from the holster to the target. Not fire the shot, not even align their sights, but move the pistol from the holster to the target. In this time period we are looking to see how precise their movements are and rather than rush them into making mistakes we give them plenty of time to do it correctly. The beauty of this drill is it eliminates the ego, it is no longer about speed. It is about how precise you can execute this micro-task; which sets you up for the correct application of the next micro task; sight management and so on.

Knowledge base

I feel too much emphasis is placed on speed and I see many students who move faster than they are able to guarantee their hits. If you move so fast you miss your shot, it really doesn’t matter. The tempo drill is harder than it sounds because you now have the opportunity to “think” your way through all the tasks and thinking requires the knowledge part. Remembering all the little details when you have the time challenges your knowledge base for sure. It doesn’t matter how skilled you are or think you are, using a tempo to execute a micro task is about the precision of your movements.

Just like in the lifting world, many students are interested in their speed or how heavy they lift. They should be more interested in the precision of their movements, in this case marksmanship fundamentals.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, December 5th, 2015

I think it’s safe to say the majority of the American citizenry does not expect violence. This mentality has lead to a weakening of not just our societal norms, but our national security.

Why bother

I can sit here and pontificate on how screwed up our government is, how one sided our media is and how “sheepish” the masses are, but it really isn’t going to fix the problem we face. Sure, there have been a few converts who have moved away from the dark side, but the efforts are largely wasted. If you finally realize you need to take your personal safety more serious forgive me if I don’t jump for joy. I don’t want to be all doom & gloom here, I would rather be matter of fact. What would the majority of those who already know we are at war gain value from, what really matters to their survival?

Hierarchy of needs

I’m a big believer in biology. In my opinion it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why, it is the survival of our species. Why are men attracted to certain women and women attracted to certain men? Eliminate the touche-feelie crap and it boils down to procreation, the continuation of our species. Breaking it down even further, survival has a lot to do with mindset. In this day an age, the majority of grass eaters have forgotten or have no idea the importance of survival and how to ensure their own, much less their family’s. It is really quite sad, but in the end your survival depends on your mindset, skill set and the tools at your disposal.

Be prepared

Mentally preparing for unplanned violence requires only it’s acknowledgment to get the proverbial ball rolling. If at a fundamental level you can acknowledge there is the possibility of unplanned violence it makes a huge difference mentally. Once you can look the animal in the eye, it frees you up to prepare. Preparation is key. A good friend of mine was on vacation over Thanksgiving holiday literally a few blocks from the Colorado shooting. In a brief discussion he commented how important preparation was and as the old Boy Scott motto goes, “be prepared” really epitomizes the situation. What have you done to prepare for that or other similar situations. Mental preparation motivates you to then physical prepare in the form of training.

How sharp is your blade

This is where the rubber really meets the road. All your mental preparation will be for not, if you don’t have the physical training to back it up. Unless your control of the Force is Jedi level you will have to fend like the rest of us. In this day an age with the escalation of terrorist threats the two most important training blocks you can obtain are combat marksmanship and concealed carry. Your skill with a firearm must be at the highest level you can obtain, then one more above that. You will never rise to the occasion you will default to your level of training. One of the reasons our standards are so tough is because nothing I do can honestly mimic the stress of real combat. If you have crappy technique based off a crappy program with crappy standards don’t be surprised by your crappy performance. Once your marksmanship skills are honed to a razor’s edge next comes having a firearm on you as often as possible; daily concealed carry. The art of concealing has evolved from the photographers vest of lure so get with the program and spend time perfecting your concealment game. When violence knocks on your door, will you answer with good intentions or hot lead. Once you get this part of the game down it will motivate you to then selecting your gear.

Water, water everywhere

Selecting your gear will be much easier once you have defined your mission. Until then, you are easily swayed by marketing and propaganda rather than truly fulfilling your needs. You also have probably asked yourself if you are fully prepared, could you use this or that or whatever new shiny object is that hits the market. At some point you have to recognize it is a come as you are war. Whatever you brought is all you got so choose wisely. It will either end the fight, allow you to strong point or allow you to move to a safe area or exit. The situation will always dictate. In other words, do you have enough ammunition to put the threat down fast. If not, will you have enough ammunition to keep them at bay while you strong point. If not, will you have enough ammunition to effectively maneuver to cover or an exit. All of the above it is implied your combat marksmanship skills are legit. So, yes, it is a good idea to create your jump bag, go bag or E&E bag whatever you want to call it, but realize you will probably not have it when it counts. You will have to win the fight, to survive, with your daily load out.

In the end, the world is not complicated. It is filled with evil, evil that must be confronted by righteous strength and courage. In the end, some people just need to be killed.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

PX3 Research Welcomes Jeff Gonzales As Their New Director Of Corporate Relations

Saturday, November 7th, 2015

Austin, TX November 4, 2015 – Effective immediately, PX3 Research Foundation is excited to announce their new Director of Corporate Relations, Jeff Gonzales.

Jeff is a former US Navy SEAL and Top-Tier weapons and tactics instructor with Trident Concepts, LLC. His military background and position within the tactical community will be of tremendous value to the PX3 Foundation. Jeff’s mission will be building awareness and on-going corporate support for the PX3 Research Foundation through education, events and sponsorship initiatives.

The PX3 Research Foundation supports solution-based research, education and outreach programs in the areas of mental health and brain safety.

Message from Jeff:

“I’m excited to be working with the PX3 Foundation, they made a significant impact in my life and I’ve seen first hand the profound impact they are making throughout the military community. The PX3 team is dedicated to empowering people’s lives with real solutions, real science and real people.”

To learn more, please contact Jeff at jeff@px3foundation.org or visit www.px3foundation.org.