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Posts Tagged ‘Kyle Defoor’

Defoor Proformance 2018 Civ Training Schedule Drops Friday Morning

Thursday, June 22nd, 2017

We wanted to give you a heads up that Kyle Defoor is posting the Civilian course 2018 schedule Friday morning at 0600 in order to give everyone a fair shot since he’s sold out of every class for the last three years and it happens quickly.

defoor-proformance-shooting.myshopify.com

Team MultiCam Video Series: Kyle Defoor

Friday, May 26th, 2017

KD3

The next installment of the Team MultiCam Video Series highlights Naval Special Operations veteran Kyle Defoor. Words like dedication, discipline, precision and drive personify Kyle. He honored our country post 9/11 as a sniper on SEAL Team 8. Since retiring, Kyle created Defoor Proformance Shooting where he teaches various shooting techniques to military, law enforcement and civilians. He is truly thankful for what the Navy gave him.

KD6

To give back, he has been raising money through his GoFundMe page for the Navy SEAL Foundation who provides immediate and ongoing support and assistance to the Naval Special Warfare community and their families. Please help Kyle raise as much money as possible for the NSF by spreading the word and donating today. Thank you.

Kyle’s GoFundMe page: www.gofundme.com/KDTeamMC

Kyle Defoor Joins Russell Moccasin Co Prostaff

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

Berlin, WI – Defoor Proformance Shooting announced today that VP and head instructor Kyle Defoor has joined the prostaff at Russell Moccasin Co. Defoor Proformance Shooting is an industry leader in contracted military shooting and tactics instruction, training over one thousand DOD personnel each year. In addition DPS conducts civilian shooting courses monthly throughout the U.S.

“I would like to welcome Kyle Defoor to our prostaff at the Russell Moccasin Co. He will be a strong addition to our already talented group of Professional Hunters here at Russell Moccasin. He will help us field test our boots and shoes in the pro shooting industry and in his running and motorcycle adventures” said Suzanne Fabricius, VP of Sales and Marketing for Russell Moccasin.

Russell Moccasin Co. is an over 100 year old family run business that hand makes each shoe and boot in Berlin,Wisconsin to perfectly fit the customer. Russell Moccasin got its start in the booming logging industry pre 1900 and has since made footwear for everyone from U.S. Presidents, to Kings, Generals, Professional Hunters and Outdoorsman the world over.

“I am humbled and very excited about being on the Russell Moccasin Prostaff. I spend 300 days a year outside in every condition imaginable. Footwear is beyond important for me. Over the years I grew tired of constantly traveling with multiple pairs of shoes and boots to meet the needs of that trip. I also didn’t like the fact that most shoes and boots I wore wouldn’t last more than a year and couldn’t be resoled or recrafted. Russell Moccasin footwear is warm, dry, lightweight, rebuildable, breathes and they can have dual or triple use. Everyone that knows me and gear will be excited to see the products from Russell Moccasin that I’ll be highlighting on my social media while shooting, running, hunting and riding motorcycles.”

For more information visit; www.russellmoccasin.com or defoor-proformance-shooting.myshopify.com/collections/all

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, April 22nd, 2017

The Long Run

“A lot of people run a race to see who is fastest. I run to see who has the most guts, who can punish himself into exhausting pace, and then at the end, punish himself even more.”
– Steve Prefontaine

Long is of course up to everyone’s interpretation, but for the most part here’s a good way to train for any running event longer than 800 m. I use this formula when I am preparing for ultramarathon of 50 miles, a unit’s PRT test of 1.5 or 3 miles, or a local 5K.

Some terms to familiarize yourself with;

Casual pace- typically two to three minutes per mile slower than your race pace. For example if the fastest mile you can run is a six minute mile your casual pace is around an eight minute 30 sec or nine minute per mile pace.

Race pace- just what it sounds like. As fast as your two little legs can pump for the distance that you going. That last part is important. My race pace for a 1 mile PRT is not the same for three-mile PRT.

Threshold pace- typically a pace that is one minute to two minutes per mile slower than your race pace.

The Long Run

Saturday and Sunday- this is perhaps one of the more important combo training days when running. For the ultra marathoners, this is the key to the kingdom. Saturday and Sunday are back-to-back long days. For the 5K and PRT people these are still back-to-back long days with less mileage. Ultra marathoners should be running for a minimum of two hours each day initially, toward a closer time to race date ultra marathoners should be running somewhere around four hours each day not to exceed 18 miles each day. I’ve never seen any benefit to doing a run longer than 18 miles when preparing for an ultra. The only exception is if you’ve never done an ultra before you need to get a 25 or 30 miler in four months or so before the race. For 5K and PRT folks, Saturdays and Sundays should be a minimum of a one hour run initially each day, and runs no longer than two hours each day not to exceed twice the race distance ( i’m putting this in here for some of the units and organizations to do a 10 mile time to run for their PRT. ) The pace for PRT and 5K folks is a casual pace. The pace for ultramarathon at the fastest is a casual pace, but realistically is somewhere around a 9:30 to 10:30 min pace.

Monday- off (remember that somewhere around 50% of all physical activities gains are from recovery. This is true for lifting weights, running, cycling, anything. This is difficult for runners to adhere to who are training especially after they begin to get runners high.)

Tues- 5K and PRT guys threshold pace for one hour. Ultra marathoners, casual pace for two hours.

Wed- 5K and PRT guys 1 mile repeat sprints at race pace. It will depend on how many of these you can do as to the total work out. For a 5K I will typically work up to doing four or five 1 mile repeats with the amount of rest in between the runs the time that I ran that 1 mile in. I have found way more success in PRT and 5K races using this formula for my “sprint” day as opposed to the typical 800 m, 400 m, 200 m, ethos of old. Ultra marathoners- two hour run at a casual pace preferably doing hill work if possible. I have never found hill work to be a necessary part of of an ultramarathon even when I ran ultra’s in the mountains like the iron Mountain 50. However, with that being said keep in mind that without hell work you will never keep up with the guys from out West.

Thu- 5K and PRT guys one hour casual pace then one hour at threshold pace. Depending on the distance you’re running, this could be 30 minutes and 30 minutes or 45 minutes and 45 minutes, etc. Ultra marathoners three hours at a casual pace.

Fri- off

Throughout the schedule ultramarathoner’s need to constantly be running with full kit (full water bottles, all gus, and salt tablets), and also experiment with wet socks, different carry methods, different clothing, body glide, sunglasses, hats, etc. Shoe choice can also be fine tuned during this. PRT and 5K guys should be occasionally training in a racing flat that they will run in on the day.

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He  is a sponsored athlete of MultiCam and runs his own company, Defoor Proformance Shooting, which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Defoor Proformance – Firearms Freedom February!

Wednesday, November 16th, 2016

Just got a note from Kyle Defoor:

With multiple requests from both states, we are adding a California carbine & combatives class in the bay area on February 20-21, 2017 as well as a New Jersey Pistol & combatives class on February 23-24, 2017.

Coast to Coast in one week to help those in these states exercise their 2A right and get some good training at the same time.

I am really excited about this! Help spread the word any way you can. I don’t think anyone has done this before in these states. We are expecting sellouts in both locations.

defoor-proformance-shooting.myshopify.com

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

In the last article I laid out my beliefs on the best optic for a mag fed carbine. Here, I’ll go over how we have gotten true one power scopes with daytime visible red dots to work as good as a traditional red dot up close with speed by mounting them the best way possible for your application. I’m going to break this down the three categories; height, type, and placement.

Height- how high you mount the scope off the top of the rail is important for a few reasons. First, if you are using a true one power scope with a daytime visible red dot you will need to make sure when you are on one power you don’t see anything in the bottom part of the reticle. This will adversely effect your short range shooting.

If you have a short barrel rifle out to about a 12 inch barrel you can generally get away with a 1.5 inch tall mount. If you have a 16 inch long barrel it’s very possible you will see part of your rail or flipped down front sight in the bottom part of the reticle on one power with a 1.5″ tall mount. There is a little bit of this that depends on the type of buttstock you are using and your overall face structure-whether you have a thin face or a more round face. The last factor would be where you like to position your butt stock, all the way out or somewhere in between?

Next, If you use any type of IR laser on the top rail this will also make a difference in whether the bottom part of your reticle has any image in it on one power. There are two solutions for this problem. One, is to use a higher mount. Typically somewhere around 1.9 to 2 inch height will give you a clear view over the top of any IR laser mounted on the top rail even with a 16″ barrel. The second option is to slide the IR laser closer to the objective lens of your scope. This may or may not work depending on the construction/type of the IR laser you have and barrel length. With my personal 11.5 inch barreled upper I can use a 1.5″ mount with a DBAL IR laser top mounted and have no issues with my USO 1-4 on one power. The second solution is to side mount your IR laser.

Mount types- I personally only use QD mounts simply because I never want to be in a position where I cannot use the gun because of some odd issue with the scope or my surroundings. I also always have zeroed irons on there ready to go. I’m a big fan of Bobro mounts because of the lever which takes away any movement in the rail slot. For non Q/D mounts I use Badger Ordnance. The type of mount you choose may depend on what mount height you need. As of this writing Larue is the only Q/D mount I’ve seen that will make a 1.9~2 inch tall mount. Do your research and make sure though.

Placement- The first thing you should know when mounting a scope to a rail is if there is any slack between the mount and the rail push as far forward toward the barrel before you lock down the mount. Recoil ends up forward and this will help in keeping your optics from shifting especially on higher calibers.

Secondly, and the real juice for this article is where to mount your LPV (low power varible). What I found to be the most beneficial it is to mount your scope a little bit forward of where it traditionally should be done. You can do this by moving the mount one, two or more slots forward in the rail or by moving the scope forward in the mount or a combo of both. I personally will put my scope on one power with the daytime visible red dot on and move it far enough forward that I do not have a traditional eye relief or sight picture that most people would call “good” for a scope. Another way to describe it is that my scope is mounted far enough forward that I actually do have a bit of scope shadow on one power. Although this may be counterintuitive to what most people have been taught or read this is the only possible way you can match the speed and target transition of a traditional RDS with an LPV. Keep in mind that when you are on one power with the red dot traditional fundamentals of scope shooting don’t apply. Also keep in mind how very little (.5-.75″) I am trying to describe with written word I push the scope forward to get the speed shooting benefit. Lastly, by doing this it will mean that when you are on max power (4,6 or 8) with your LPV you will need to slightly slide your face forward on the butt stock to get a fundamentally acceptable scoped sight picture for an accurate long range shot- but, because it is a long range shot you have time to do that.

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He  is a sponsored athlete of MultiCam and runs his own company, Defoor Proformance Shooting, which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

Twenty years of using scoped rifles and two wars of operating as a sniper makes me a firm believer in a first focal plane (FFP), Low Power Varible (LPV) with true one power for optics on a carbine. In my opinion the best setup for engagements from CQB distance to the capability of the caliber is a true one power to four or six power for 5.56mm and eight power for 7.62mm.

Years ago I helped develop the U.S. Optics SR4-C. It has a mil reticle on the first focal plane and a Aimpoint like, daytime visible red dot on the second focal plane (SFP). This is important to note for two reasons;

One, by having the reticle on the FFP- any range estimation done with the reticle will be true no matter what magnification your on. With a reticle on the SFP your ranging has to be done on full magnification to be true. This is huge for lo-vis or urban work where having a laser range finder may not happen, and using less than max magnification is done routinely. Additionally, I teach holds on a mil based reticle almost exclusively and they remain true no matter the magnification with a FFP reticle.

Two, by having the red dot on the SFP, the red dot will remain the same size no matter what magnification your on. With this you can use the red dot on max power for far shots at speed and this makes the LPV able to be used in CQB distance on one power with only a minimal increase in split times or first shots from the ready when individuals first swap over to it from a common red dot sight. Typically, I see nothing more than .15 of a difference compared to a traditional red dot on first shots from the ready and .05 on splits. Next, I’ll go over how to get rid of the time differences on first shots and splits compared to red dots.


Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He  is a sponsored athlete of MultiCam and runs his own company, Defoor Proformance Shooting, which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Countdown to the 2017 Defoor Proformance Training Schedule

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

I just got this note from Kyle Defoor.

Our complete 2017 open enrollment schedule will be posted around 0200 Zulu Friday July 29.

For the past two years we have sold out of every class and had full waiting lists months out from the actual class dates. This year we strived to get the full schedule out at one time and early to allow everyone an equal chance to grab a slot. Luckily, due to an election year, almost all of our mil/LE/ and gov clients scheduled 2017 training early as well so we are one month ahead of schedule.

In 2016 I added a much needed medical block to all OE classes and it has been met with great enthusiasm and success. In 2010 we added a mindset brief that has become part of who we are. Once again next year we are adding more value to the classes by conducting combatives in each class to go with the firearm being taught. To us this is welcome and timely. Along with mindset and basic medical we all here at DPS feel these are interconnected skills for our target audience and should be taught together. In the past, this wasn’t possible but just as a shooter gets better with practice and gear changes over time I and my crew have gotten better and learned how to teach more effectively. Having over 1000 students a year for a 5 years in a row does that.

Students will again see and experience direct feedback from our contracted work in regards to how we are able to fit in these additional subjects and still maintain the shooting curriculum we have become known for. Yes there are longer hours but we think everyone will appreciate the effort and knowledge spread from the ten thousand hands that came before us.

Me and the boys look forward to training with all those who choose to burn some quality reps with us in 2017. Thank you to all those that follow, support, train with, and allow us the opportunity.

Respect,
Kyle Defoor