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Posts Tagged ‘Kyle Defoor’

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, March 8th, 2014

The Long Run

“A lot of people run a race to see who is fastest. I run to see who has the most guts, who can punish himself into exhausting pace, and then at the end, punish himself even more.”
- Steve Prefontaine

Long is of course up to everyone’s interpretation, but for the most part here’s a good way to train for any running event longer than 800 m. I use this formula when I am preparing for ultramarathon of 50 miles, a unit’s PRT test of 1.5 or 3 miles, or a local 5K.

Some terms to familiarize yourself with;

Casual pace- typically two to three minutes per mile slower than your race pace. For example if the fastest mile you can run is a six minute mile your casual pace is around an eight minute 30 sec or nine minute per mile pace.

Race pace- just what it sounds like. As fast as your two little legs can pump for the distance that you going. That last part is important. My race pace for a 1 mile PRT is not the same for three-mile PRT.

Threshold pace- typically a pace that is one minute to two minutes per mile slower than your race pace.

The Long Run

Saturday and Sunday- this is perhaps one of the more important combo training days when running. For the ultra marathoners, this is the key to the kingdom. Saturday and Sunday are back-to-back long days. For the 5K and PRT people these are still back-to-back long days with less mileage. Ultra marathoners should be running for a minimum of two hours each day initially, toward a closer time to race date ultra marathoners should be running somewhere around four hours each day not to exceed 18 miles each day. I’ve never seen any benefit to doing a run longer than 18 miles when preparing for an ultra. The only exception is if you’ve never done an ultra before you need to get a 25 or 30 miler in four months or so before the race. For 5K and PRT folks, Saturdays and Sundays should be a minimum of a one hour run initially each day, and runs no longer than two hours each day not to exceed twice the race distance ( i’m putting this in here for some of the units and organizations to do a 10 mile time to run for their PRT. ) The pace for PRT and 5K folks is a casual pace. The pace for ultramarathon at the fastest is a casual pace, but realistically is somewhere around a 9:30 to 10:30 min pace.

Monday- off (remember that somewhere around 50% of all physical activities gains are from recovery. This is true for lifting weights, running, cycling, anything. This is difficult for runners to adhere to who are training especially after they begin to get runners high.)

Tues- 5K and PRT guys threshold pace for one hour. Ultra marathoners, casual pace for two hours.

Wed- 5K and PRT guys 1 mile repeat sprints at race pace. It will depend on how many of these you can do as to the total work out. For a 5K I will typically work up to doing four or five 1 mile repeats with the amount of rest in between the runs the time that I ran that 1 mile in. I have found way more success in PRT and 5K races using this formula for my “sprint” day as opposed to the typical 800 m, 400 m, 200 m, ethos of old. Ultra marathoners- two hour run at a casual pace preferably doing hill work if possible. I have never found hill work to be a necessary part of of an ultramarathon even when I ran ultra’s in the mountains like the iron Mountain 50. However, with that being said keep in mind that without hell work you will never keep up with the guys from out West.

Thu- 5K and PRT guys one hour casual pace then one hour at threshold pace. Depending on the distance you’re running, this could be 30 minutes and 30 minutes or 45 minutes and 45 minutes, etc. Ultra marathoners three hours at a casual pace.

Fri- off

Throughout the schedule ultramarathoner’s need to constantly be running with full kit (full water bottles, all gus, and salt tablets), and also experiment with wet socks, different carry methods, different clothing, body glide, sunglasses, hats, etc. Shoe choice can also be fine tuned during this. PRT and 5K guys should be occasionally training in a racing flat that they will run in on the day.

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He now serves as the brand ambassador for Mission Ready Equipment and runs his own company which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

www.kyledefoor.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Defoor MIL/LE Lead Climber Course

Monday, January 20th, 2014

An offshoot from Defoor’s popular Urban Climber course, the restricted enrollment Lead Climber course is designed to teach students to be able to safely climb with considerations for tactical operations. Subjects taught include reduced racks, improvised belays and rappels, hauling gear, and more. Each student will leave the class able to safely lead a 5.6-5.8 climb.

All gear used for the course is available from Mission Ready Equipment.

www.kyledefoor.com

Another Cool Tip From Kyle Defoor

Sunday, January 5th, 2014

Finally, a use for tinfoil we can agree with. Kyle Defoor recommends you use it to shim older, loose fitting, X-series lights from SureFire.

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Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, January 4th, 2014

Since so many of us are like-minded individuals and have the same interests not only in guns and shooting but other things as well, I’ve decided to offer some tips in four of the other areas where I have years of experience; motorcycles, climbing, running, and hunting. I think this will be a nice complement to the other gunfighters on here who offer tips and tricks and hopefully keeps it fresh. Sadly or happily, these four subjects along with shooting and tactics are pretty much all my life is and has been since a very young age. This week it’s going to be a motorcycle riding tip.

I log somewhere between 15 and 20,000 miles a year on my motorcycle. I use it as my primary mode of transportation to most classes that are driving distance from my home. I’ve been doing that kind of mileage for years, and I also have a very brief roadracing background on sport bikes. All in all I’ve been riding a bike on the street or the track for over 20 years now.

One very simple and important fundamental of riding correctly either on the track, street or dirt is manipulation of the clutch lever and brake lever with your fingers. On a comparison scale, this is strong hand and other strong hand grip when shooting a pistol. More often than not what I see on the street is a rider that uses all four fingers to work the clutch and any combination of fingers except the correct two to work the front brake lever. Harley riders and big cruiser riders are the biggest offenders of this, but young inexperienced race replica riders are a close second.

1

The correct way to manipulate the clutch is to adjust your clutch so that it activates when pulled in with two fingers on the lever and the lever is touching your ring finger. This provides the ability for the rider to activate the clutch and still have superb control on the handlebars and the bike itself. A side benefit of this technique is that when racing or riding hard your shifts are actually faster because all four fingers do not have to come up and over the lever and then regain grip on the handlebar. Anyone who has rode the tail of the Dragon on the East Coast, or the canyons of Azusa California on the West Coast can attest to this and knows exactly what I’m talking about.

2

The activation of the front brake is exactly the same using the index finger and middle finger only to apply brake pressure. On this side of the handlebars one of the most overlooked fundamentals is correct placement of the lever up or down on the handle bar to provide maximum leverage for the rider when he is using only those two fingers. Very similar to guns, motorcycles do not come set up correctly. You have to fine tune placement and adjustments to make them work for you.

3

Lastly, another small tip on using your clutch and brake levers correctly is that you can slide your hands closer to the middle of the bar or further toward the end of the bar to provide more or less leverage. This is an especially important consideration for the majority of Harley riders because of the size of Harley handlebars and the size of the levers combined with a cable activated clutch instead of an hydraulic one.

Once you start riding like this you will not only see the benefits and become better at shifting, turning and overall manipulation of the handlebars, but you are also doing in motorcycling the equivalent to “long finger in the side” in shooting and that’s showing the rest of the world that your professional.

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He now serves as the brand ambassador for Mission Ready Equipment and runs his own company which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

www.kyledefoor.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Alias Training & Security Services – Defoor Proformance Shooting Flexfit Trucker Hat

Thursday, December 12th, 2013

Defoor Proformance Hat

It’s been called the greatest shooter & operator accessory in the history of modern firearms. Guaranteed to increase accuracy and make you faster at the same time, it’s first appearance on the scene 3 years ago resulted in increased pregnancies and a shortage of IPSC and NRA bulls nationwide. Made in mesh trucker hat style paying tribute to Kyle’s Alabama upbringing, the DPS logo in patriotic red, white and blue channeling the artistry of the 1950′s when putting your name on something meant everything. It’s sans Velcro, silly Latin sayings, and that damn hole in the back that sunburns the bald, but in a pinch can be used as a signal panel, brass bucket, currency in most countries or a shooting rest for a rifle. The bill can be worn West Coast or Southern Style. When you spot another in this hat it guarantees a like minded friend for life and we look forward to you sending in the pics and stories.

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is a former Special Mission Unit combat decorated Navy SEAL and sniper who served in Afghanistan. Kyle teaches firearms and tactics to military and law enforcement personnel in the United States and worldwide. He also offers marksmanship related open enrollment classes to the public.

www.kyledefoor.com

You can get the hat here: aliastraining.com/defoorproformanceshootingflexfittruckerhat/

Kyle Defoor 2-Day Urban Climber Course

Monday, November 25th, 2013

Kyle Defoor is holding an upcoming Urban Climber Course. The course is designed to teach successful climbing and extraction of any vertical wall in an urban area, leaving no sign. Students will be taught climbing techniques tailored to MIL/LE personnel using gear that fits in a 30L civilian daypack and weights less than 10 lbs. The course is available to GOV/MIL/LE personnel only.

Further details, including a gear list, can be found at www.kyledefoor.com/2009/11/2-day-urban-climber-govmille-only.html

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, November 23rd, 2013

The 10.5″ Death Machine

KD AFG
Specs:
10.3″ barrel
Carbine length gas system
1:7 twist barrel
Buffer that will run (55 gr) ammo
Knights Armament RIS (7″)
Standard front sight tower
Cut down rear carrying handle
Old KAC vertical fore grip
Aimpoint comp M2
Wilcox Aimpoint mount
Surefire 6P wth Wilcox mount
SOPMOD stock
Boonie Packer 2 pt adjustable sling (who else remembers that!!!!)

This was the original set up that we had in the mid 90s when we transitioned from MP5 to M4′s. There aren’t many people in the shooting and gun industry that are old enough to remember this. Most of us guys at Alias are though. This was the first real rifle caliber gun that we had that worked well for commando missions. Before this thing we were hose clamping mag lights onto CAR-15′s and using ACOG’s on top of a fixed carrying handle. This is the gun that both Tier 1 units originally took to war before the HK416. This set up has killed a shit ton of bad dudes. This is the gun that won the war; at least in my opinion. This is what the unit and the command had when we figured out how to fight in Afghanistan. How to do assaults, how to do infiltrations, how to do ambushes, the whole kit and caboodle.

Over gassed, yes. Needs more lube than normal, yes. Sucks for getting dirty when shooting with a suppressor, yes- but….. I’ll put it up against any modern weapon as long as it’s in the right hands.

It worked wet, it worked in the sand, it worked in the dirt, it worked at altitude and it shot out the 200 yards no problem. This was not an Army soldier’s gun, It was not a Marines rifle, It was an Assaulters weapon…Period.

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is a former Special Mission Unit combat decorated Navy SEAL and sniper who served in Afghanistan. Kyle teaches firearms and tactics to military and law enforcement personnel in the United States and worldwide. He also offers marksmanship related open enrollment classes to the public.

www.kyledefoor.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Final 2013 Open Enrollment Class For Kyle Defoor In December

Thursday, November 14th, 2013

Kyle Defoor’s last class in 2013 is right around the corner near Naples, Florida at the Altair Training Solutions Facility.

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Kyle Defoor 2-Day Carbine – Dec 14-15, 2013 – Naples, Florida

aliastraining.com/kyledefoor2-dayadvancedcarbine-dec14-152013naplesfl

Kyle Defoor is a former Special Mission Unit combat decorated Navy SEAL and sniper who served in Afghanistan. Kyle teaches firearms and tactics to military and law enforcement personnel in the United States and worldwide. He also offers marksmanship related open enrollment classes to the public.

Kyle Defoor Launches Updated Website

Friday, October 18th, 2013

Kyle Defoor has streamlined his website to improve navigation and added links to his sponsors.

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“There is great value in the honor of privacy and discretion. Few will see it, but those who do hold it in high regard. It will pay off.”

- A note to Kyle from an unnamed military unit

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, September 28th, 2013

Generally, Kyle shares training and employment tips but we thought that you’d like to see another side of Defoor. He’s an avid outdoorsman and shares reviews of equipment he uses for work and play on his blog.

Not a lot of gear reviews lately here. I’ve been turning down more gear lately than normal. I’ve also been advising manufacturers from different industries why the things they send to me suck so bad, and believe me, some of the stuff I’ve seen recently really does.

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With that said, I’ve had the Mountain Hardwear Ghost Whisperer for almost a year now. I wanted to get a lot of cold time in it before I made a call and I wanted to really work in it to see the durability, which I admit, I was concerned with at first.

The CEO of Mission Ready Equipment sent me the GW with the words- “you’re not gonna believe it”. That about sums it up. It’s almost unbelievably warm for what it is.

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What it is is a 7oz (my scale, MH says 8) down jacket that will fit in your back pocket (yes it hangs out a little but not much) that has down in it that has been “infused” ( don’t ask me) to make it almost waterproof (I’m a toad man, so nothing is waterproof to me). I’ve been in rain with it and so far it lives up to the hype. The outside shell is a nylon that my only complaint is its shininess (I don’t think MH is too much about lo pro judging from the yellow zips on my Drystein), and of course it’s loud for hunting, but I simply wear a shirt over top and it’s golden.

Combined with above said rain shell it is comfortable with only a t-shirt down to low-mid thirties easily. I would venture to say the GW is as warm as a “normal” 600-800 fill down jacket but obviously without the weight, bulk, and inability to get wet and still perform.

It’s so damn small and “nothing” feeling that it takes some time with it and some nerve to take it as your only thermal piece. I’ve done that many times and it has yet to let me down. One day, I even did my normal range setup by carrying steel ipscs on my shoulder 200 yards for 40 mins wearing the GW and it didn’t tear. I mean you could rip it with something sharp if you weren’t careful but it’s as durable as any normal nylon type jacket.

For those that have ventured down the super light weight jacket road before, think of this as a Patagonia ultra light down shirt that is twice as warm and the same size, or very similar to a Montbell Alpine but more durable IMHO.

Highly recommended for anyone but especially for those who are of a minimalist mindset.
Find it here- www.missionreadyequipment.com/mountain-hardwear-ghost-whisperer-jacket-mens

V/R,

Kyle Defoor

“Trainer of Feeders”

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He now serves as the brand ambassador for Mission Ready Equipment and runs his own company which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

www.kyledefoor.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.