TYR Tactical

Posts Tagged ‘Kyle Defoor’

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, September 10th, 2016

In the last article I laid out my beliefs on the best optic for a mag fed carbine. Here, I’ll go over how we have gotten true one power scopes with daytime visible red dots to work as good as a traditional red dot up close with speed by mounting them the best way possible for your application. I’m going to break this down the three categories; height, type, and placement.

Height- how high you mount the scope off the top of the rail is important for a few reasons. First, if you are using a true one power scope with a daytime visible red dot you will need to make sure when you are on one power you don’t see anything in the bottom part of the reticle. This will adversely effect your short range shooting.

If you have a short barrel rifle out to about a 12 inch barrel you can generally get away with a 1.5 inch tall mount. If you have a 16 inch long barrel it’s very possible you will see part of your rail or flipped down front sight in the bottom part of the reticle on one power with a 1.5″ tall mount. There is a little bit of this that depends on the type of buttstock you are using and your overall face structure-whether you have a thin face or a more round face. The last factor would be where you like to position your butt stock, all the way out or somewhere in between?

Next, If you use any type of IR laser on the top rail this will also make a difference in whether the bottom part of your reticle has any image in it on one power. There are two solutions for this problem. One, is to use a higher mount. Typically somewhere around 1.9 to 2 inch height will give you a clear view over the top of any IR laser mounted on the top rail even with a 16″ barrel. The second option is to slide the IR laser closer to the objective lens of your scope. This may or may not work depending on the construction/type of the IR laser you have and barrel length. With my personal 11.5 inch barreled upper I can use a 1.5″ mount with a DBAL IR laser top mounted and have no issues with my USO 1-4 on one power. The second solution is to side mount your IR laser.

Mount types- I personally only use QD mounts simply because I never want to be in a position where I cannot use the gun because of some odd issue with the scope or my surroundings. I also always have zeroed irons on there ready to go. I’m a big fan of Bobro mounts because of the lever which takes away any movement in the rail slot. For non Q/D mounts I use Badger Ordnance. The type of mount you choose may depend on what mount height you need. As of this writing Larue is the only Q/D mount I’ve seen that will make a 1.9~2 inch tall mount. Do your research and make sure though.

Placement- The first thing you should know when mounting a scope to a rail is if there is any slack between the mount and the rail push as far forward toward the barrel before you lock down the mount. Recoil ends up forward and this will help in keeping your optics from shifting especially on higher calibers.

Secondly, and the real juice for this article is where to mount your LPV (low power varible). What I found to be the most beneficial it is to mount your scope a little bit forward of where it traditionally should be done. You can do this by moving the mount one, two or more slots forward in the rail or by moving the scope forward in the mount or a combo of both. I personally will put my scope on one power with the daytime visible red dot on and move it far enough forward that I do not have a traditional eye relief or sight picture that most people would call “good” for a scope. Another way to describe it is that my scope is mounted far enough forward that I actually do have a bit of scope shadow on one power. Although this may be counterintuitive to what most people have been taught or read this is the only possible way you can match the speed and target transition of a traditional RDS with an LPV. Keep in mind that when you are on one power with the red dot traditional fundamentals of scope shooting don’t apply. Also keep in mind how very little (.5-.75″) I am trying to describe with written word I push the scope forward to get the speed shooting benefit. Lastly, by doing this it will mean that when you are on max power (4,6 or 8) with your LPV you will need to slightly slide your face forward on the butt stock to get a fundamentally acceptable scoped sight picture for an accurate long range shot- but, because it is a long range shot you have time to do that.

Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He  is a sponsored athlete of MultiCam and runs his own company, Defoor Proformance Shooting, which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Kyle Defoor

Saturday, August 6th, 2016

Twenty years of using scoped rifles and two wars of operating as a sniper makes me a firm believer in a first focal plane (FFP), Low Power Varible (LPV) with true one power for optics on a carbine. In my opinion the best setup for engagements from CQB distance to the capability of the caliber is a true one power to four or six power for 5.56mm and eight power for 7.62mm.

Years ago I helped develop the U.S. Optics SR4-C. It has a mil reticle on the first focal plane and a Aimpoint like, daytime visible red dot on the second focal plane (SFP). This is important to note for two reasons;

One, by having the reticle on the FFP- any range estimation done with the reticle will be true no matter what magnification your on. With a reticle on the SFP your ranging has to be done on full magnification to be true. This is huge for lo-vis or urban work where having a laser range finder may not happen, and using less than max magnification is done routinely. Additionally, I teach holds on a mil based reticle almost exclusively and they remain true no matter the magnification with a FFP reticle.

Two, by having the red dot on the SFP, the red dot will remain the same size no matter what magnification your on. With this you can use the red dot on max power for far shots at speed and this makes the LPV able to be used in CQB distance on one power with only a minimal increase in split times or first shots from the ready when individuals first swap over to it from a common red dot sight. Typically, I see nothing more than .15 of a difference compared to a traditional red dot on first shots from the ready and .05 on splits. Next, I’ll go over how to get rid of the time differences on first shots and splits compared to red dots.


Kyle Defoor is one of the world’s most committed and passionate shooting instructors. Literally growing up with a gun in hand he took his talents into the military where he was combat decorated as a SEAL assaulter and sniper. Kyle helped to create and define modern training while along the way personally teaching thousands of military personal and civilians from around the globe. His shooting prowess led to appearances on multiple TV shows including Shooting Gallery, Tactical Arms, and Tactical Impact, and guest appearances on History Channel. Kyle’s outdoor athletic lifestyle includes shooting, ultra running, stand-up paddle surfing and climbing. He  is a sponsored athlete of MultiCam and runs his own company, Defoor Proformance Shooting, which offers tactical training, wilderness navigation, TV and film consulting, and motivational speaking.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Countdown to the 2017 Defoor Proformance Training Schedule

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

I just got this note from Kyle Defoor.

Our complete 2017 open enrollment schedule will be posted around 0200 Zulu Friday July 29.

For the past two years we have sold out of every class and had full waiting lists months out from the actual class dates. This year we strived to get the full schedule out at one time and early to allow everyone an equal chance to grab a slot. Luckily, due to an election year, almost all of our mil/LE/ and gov clients scheduled 2017 training early as well so we are one month ahead of schedule.

In 2016 I added a much needed medical block to all OE classes and it has been met with great enthusiasm and success. In 2010 we added a mindset brief that has become part of who we are. Once again next year we are adding more value to the classes by conducting combatives in each class to go with the firearm being taught. To us this is welcome and timely. Along with mindset and basic medical we all here at DPS feel these are interconnected skills for our target audience and should be taught together. In the past, this wasn’t possible but just as a shooter gets better with practice and gear changes over time I and my crew have gotten better and learned how to teach more effectively. Having over 1000 students a year for a 5 years in a row does that.

Students will again see and experience direct feedback from our contracted work in regards to how we are able to fit in these additional subjects and still maintain the shooting curriculum we have become known for. Yes there are longer hours but we think everyone will appreciate the effort and knowledge spread from the ten thousand hands that came before us.

Me and the boys look forward to training with all those who choose to burn some quality reps with us in 2017. Thank you to all those that follow, support, train with, and allow us the opportunity.

Respect,
Kyle Defoor

Sometimes The Answers Are Easy To See

Thursday, June 2nd, 2016

Photo appropriated from Kyle Defoor.

Kyle Defoor’s Traveling Rig

Monday, February 22nd, 2016

Former SEAL and tactical trainer Kyle Defoor keeps his traveling rig simple.

“My traveling setup. Lightweight and easy to pack taking up very little room. HSG Taco mag pouches, AO chest rig, cobra rigger belt, micro grip panel”

Shooting In The Cold – A 10-Part Series By Kyle Defoor

Thursday, February 11th, 2016

Kyle Defoor published a 10-part series on shooting in the cold. In particular, he concentrates on clothing system selection.

Defoor Tumblr

Shooting In The Cold Part 1

My experience operating in the cold started in the military both in training and real world. I’ve worked in -25 up to just below freezing for long stretches (days not hours) of time. When I came into the military there was not a lot of good gear to be had. This changed later with consulting from Mark Twight via Natick Labs. Today we have more quality choices from more manufacturers but there is also more confusion in some areas. Hopefully this series of articles will help out those who are looking to buy quality gear for training in the elements for extended duration.

While you’re reading remember that exposure time is a major factor. A lot of students I see miss this important fact when showing up to a class. This happens with our military contracts too. I’ve heard comments early on about how we (instructors) are overdressed or that they (student) “don’t get cold”, “I’m from the North”, “I’m used to it”, etc. Somewhere around the hour mark completely exposed with no break is where most people realize basing your needs for shooting and training in the cold on the jacket you go get the mail in or take the dog for a walk with was a huge mistake.

Lastly, physical conditioning plays a huge role in staying warm. This mostly concerns circulation and over very long stretches, metabolism. Bottom line is the better shape your in both cardio wise and strength wise the easier your body can adapt to an unusual environment. I’ll leave you with the words of the Norwegians who’ve been training and shooting in cold conditions a long time arguably as good as anyone- “there is no bad weather, only bad gear”.

This is part 1, but the others can be found at kyledefoor.tumblr.com.

Defoor Performance 2016 Training Schedule Is Live

Friday, August 28th, 2015

  
defoor-proformance-shooting.myshopify.com/collections/all

Defoor Proformance Shooting and HSG Join Forces for “Made in the USA” Series

Monday, June 22nd, 2015

High Speed Gear is pleased to announce that Kyle Defoor of Defoor Proformance Shooting and HSG have joined forces for his “Made in the USA Series”. Kyle is a premier firearms instructor, actively teaching firearms and tactics to military, law enforcement, and civilians. Given his vast knowledge gained as a decorated special operator with combat experience he brings a wealth of knowledge and passion to the support gear he selects. We are humbled that Kyle choose our Battle Proven Tactical Nylon Gear as part of his series.