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Posts Tagged ‘Leupold’

Leupold Adds Shawn Skipper to Marketing Team As Public Relations Specialist

Tuesday, November 21st, 2017

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BEAVERTON, Ore. — Leupold & Stevens, Inc., is pleased to announce that Shawn Skipper has joined the optics manufacturer as its new senior public relations specialist.

Skipper will head up Leupold’s public and media relations efforts, putting his years of editorial experience to work. Prior to joining Leupold®, Skipper was the digital managing editor of the National Rifle Association’s American Hunter title, where he covered optics, firearms, ammunition and accessories. An accomplished writer and editor, Skipper now brings his expertise in outdoor media to the Leupold team.

An avid hunter and angler, Skipper grew up in the iconic duck blinds of the Chesapeake Bay region before attending Seton Hall University, where he earned a degree in journalism and public relations.

“We’re ecstatic to have Shawn join us here at Leupold,” said Bruce Pettet, president and chief executive officer for Leupold & Stevens, Inc. “Over the years, we’ve gotten to know Shawn very well as he’s covered our products or joined us on hunts. His passion for hunting and his knowledge of the outdoors are going to make a great team even better.”

For more information on Leupold products, please visit us at Leupold.com.

Leupold Adds to Thermal Optics Line with Handheld LTO-Quest

Thursday, April 27th, 2017

During SHOT Show, Leupold introduced the LTO-Tracker, a monocular-style, handheld thermal camera intended primarily for the hunting market. Due to its low cost and simple operation, it didn’t take long for LE professionals as well as search and rescue teams to show interest. During a recent writers event at the High Bar Homestad in Wyoming, I had the opportunity to check out the LTO-Tracker as well as the new LTO-Quest. While you employ the LTO-Tracker like a monocular, the LTO-Quest reminds me of the bug tracker feom ‘Aliens’. You point it at your objective and look down at a screen.

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(The item on the screen is a suppressor)

I really like the temperature readout and the eight filters are easy to browse through in order to find the best contrast for the situation. I also appreciate the ability to collect screen captures. It’s a cool product and definitely worth checking out.

BEAVERTON, Ore. — Leupold & Stevens, Inc. introduces the latest in its line of Leupold® Thermal Optics, the LTO-Quest™.

This pocket-sized thermal optic helps hunters find downed game, track blood trails and increase situational awareness. The LTO-Quest provides a precise temperature reading of the object being scanned and displays it on the screen. In addition to showing heat sources, the LTO-Quest has a built-in flashlight and camera which allows you to capture and store as many as 2,000 images.

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“Leupold works closely with hunters to develop products to help them be more effective in the field,” said Tim Lesser, vice president of product development for Leupold & Stevens, Inc. “The LTO-Quest gives hunters a pocket-sized tool to help recover game that may otherwise have been lost.”

Cycle through the eight color filters using a simple three-button interface. An internal, rechargeable battery delivers four hours of run time, and uses a standard micro USB for charging and image downloads.

A built-in flashlight offers user-adjustable power settings that can be set to meet the needs of the hunter. With a maximum output of 300 lumens, the LTO-Quest provides plenty of power to help locate game or find paths to stands and blinds.

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Featuring a generous 2.4″ LCD screen, the LTO-Quest provides a 20-degree field of view with a 300-yard detection range. The 15hz display offers smooth images and is easy to view in all lighting conditions.

Sized to fit in a pocket or small pouch, the LTO-Quest is a lightweight powerhouse that belongs in every hunter’s pack. In addition to afield, the LTO-Quest is a great tool for everything from keeping an eye on property, examining energy efficiency around the home, or checking mechanical equipment for heat issues.

For more information on Leupold products, please visit us at www.leupold.com.

Join the discussion on Facebook, www.facebook.com/LeupoldOptics, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LeupoldOptics or on Instagram at www.instagram.com/LeupoldOptics.

SHOT Show 17 – Leupold Introduces New Mk 8 Variant

Tuesday, January 31st, 2017

The Leupold Mk 8 is one of the most popular optics on the market. However, it’s expensive and not everyone requires the scope’s illuminated reticle, so Leupold came out with this new model to make it available to more shooters.

It’s still a 3.5-25×56 with Mk 8 construction. They’ve added low-profile M5C2 ZeroLock adjustments and a non-illuminated front focal plane reticle.

www.leupold.com

Leupold Files Lawsuit Against Nightforce Over Patent Violations

Thursday, August 4th, 2016

BEAVERTON, Ore. — Leupold & Stevens, Inc., has filed a civil suit in the U.S. District Court of Oregon alleging patent violations by Lightforce U.S.A., doing business as Nightforce. In the suit, Leupold & Stevens, Inc., alleges that Nightforce is marketing and selling products that infringe on a variety of patents owned by Leupold & Stevens, Inc. and is seeking all available remedies.

The lawsuit is based on six patents for riflescope adjustments, internal optical mechanisms, and flip covers.
Leupold & Stevens, Inc., has been pioneering riflescope and sporting optics technology since 1947, when it developed a non-fogging riflescope charged with nitrogen. Today, Leupold® has been granted over 151 patents and design registrations in 18 countries, representing Leupold’s continued commitment to innovation and development of sports optics. For more information on Leupold products, please visit us at www.leupold.com.

Leupold Expands Phone Hours to Better Serve Customers

Wednesday, July 27th, 2016

BEAVERTON, Ore. — Leupold & Stevens, Inc., has expanded the hours of its Tech Services call center, making it even easier for Leupold owners to access the product expertise of the services staff.

Based at Leupold’s Beaverton, Oregon, manufacturing facility, the Tech Services staff can help callers resolve issues, answer usage questions or even help customers decide which Leupold product is right for their needs. With decades of combined experience on staff, the Tech Services department can handle almost any question thrown its way.
“For Leupold, customer service has always been a top priority,” said Rob Morrison, vice president global marketing at Leupold & Stevens, Inc. “Providing Gold Ring Full Lifetime Guarantee support is certainly a primary mission, but we also are here to help our customers get the most out of their Leupold gear. From picking a reticle to learning about the Custom Dial System® to finding out what mount options exist, we’re here to help.”

Tech Services representatives will be available starting at 5 a.m. Pacific Time and will be on-hand to offer their assistance until 8 p.m. This allows Tech Services to offer assistance to Leupold customers from the East Coast all the way to Hawaii at times that are convenient.

For more information on Leupold products, please visit us at www.leupold.com.

Join the discussion on Facebook, www.facebook.com/LeupoldOptics, on Twitter at www.twitter.com/LeupoldOptics or on Instagram at www.instagram.com/LeupoldOptics.

Leupold Announces Live Online Event With Mark “Oz” Geist

Tuesday, July 5th, 2016

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BEAVERTON, Ore. — Leupold & Stevens, Inc., will be hosting a special webinar event with Mark “Oz” Geist, one of the Annex Security Team members whose story was told in the film “13 Hours: The Secret Soldiers of Benghazi.” During this live online event, Geist and Leupold’s Tim Lesser will discuss optics, especially their use in tactical operations, and share stories from the field. Geist and Lesser will also be answering questions fielded from online attendees during the webcast.

“Mark is an American hero, and to have his perspective on tactical optics and their real-world application is an incredible honor for us to share,” said Bruce Pettet, president and chief executive officer of Leupold & Stevens, Inc. “Servicemen and women like Mark are one of the reasons Leupold & Stevens employees are relentless in our mission to make the most reliable and rugged optics in the world.”

Geist, a former U.S. Marine, was serving as a private security contractor working with the CIA at a classified post known as The Annex in Benghazi, Libya, on Sept. 11, 2012. When U.S. Ambassador Christopher Stevens was attacked by terrorists at his nearby residence, the Annex Security Team defied orders and responded, saving the lives of dozens of U.S. State Department employees.

Later that night and into the morning, the same forces launched an attack against The Annex, where Geist and his team successfully repelled wave after wave of gunmen until they were able to evacuate to the airport. Geist was seriously injured in the attack, which claimed the lives of two security contractors, a State Department employee and Ambassador Stevens.

Please join Leupold for this special event on July 6, at 1 p.m. Pacific time at http://leupold.yourbrandlive.com/c/leupold-event-1.

For more information on Leupold products, please visit us at www.leupold.com.

Meet “The Grunt” From EraThr3

Monday, May 2nd, 2016

The Scenario
Last month I spent a few days with Buck Doyle of Follow Through Consulting in Utah courtesy of PROOF Research. During his Scoped Carbine Course we used rifles provided by EraThr3 which featured PROOF Research carbon fiber barrels. They were outfitted with SureFire WarComps and suppressors along with Leupold Mark 6 3-18×44 scopes with the Tremor3 reticle and Mark 6 IMS mounts. Barry Dueck also brought sets of his Rapid Transition Sights for each rifle which offers M16A2-style front and rear sights at a 45 deg offset. I use the RTS on my telescopic sight equipped 7.62 gas gun and they are great for taking those close in shots. At Buck’s course it was no different, and I used them quite often in different scenarios.

We fired Hornady 55 and 75 grain Superformance Match cartridges in 5.56mm during the course, depending on whether the rifle was suppressed or not. During shots out past 500m, we relied solely on the 75 grain rounds. This whole combination allowed participants to effectively engage targets out to 1164 yards. This course and firearm setup really increased my confidence in the ability of 5.56mm to reach out and hit targets past 1000 yards. To be sure, there are better rounds available for those distances and we had to use some pretty serious holds to hit out that far, but it’s just something I’d never done before as I consider targets past 600 yards as beyond the application of the 5.56 round.

A Proof-of-Concept Carbine
EraThr3 provided a new proof-of-concept rifle configuration for the course participants which they plan to place into production as, “The Grunt”. They decided upon the design and built them in a matter of weeks but the upper and lowers were cut specifically for this new gun. You may notice that there is no cutout on the upper for the boltcatch. Instead, they milled material from the reverse of the catch in order to give it enough room for operation. Additionally, the ejection port cover pin is captive so there’s no retaining ring. This is also the first time EraThr3 has incorporated a forward assist on a carbine.

Overall, it’s a very lightweight rifle, but an expensive one. These rifles would retail for over $10k with half of that price going to the glass alone, which also added some heft to these otherwise very lightweight rifles. Of course, we wouldn’t have been hitting targets at those ranges without the optics. I know some are going to say that this is one expensive rifle. Yes, it is. Although many folks won’t be able to afford it, EraThr3 is okay with that.

The Parts
They were very open about the rifle’s components and were more than happy to provide links to the parts where available. Although EraThr3 may substitute some items for production versions of “The Grunt”, the rifles we fired in Utah included the following components:

-16″ Proof Research Carbon Fiber 5.56mm barrel, 1:7 twist.
Surefire WARCOMP 556 Muzzle Device
-New E3 Billet upper receiver, with forward assist, Hidden dust cover rod, and more rigid design than its’ counterpart, “Project Anorexia” released last year.
-New E3 Skeletonized Lower Receiver with improved features such as a matched grip profile, elimination of roll pin, hidden duct cover rod, and more robust lines.
-New E3 14″ M-LOK Handguard with full length skeletonized picatinny top rail.
Titanium Bolt Carrier
Properly Headspaced JP Enhanced Bolt
V7 Lightweight Portdoor
V7 Portdoor Rod
-New Titanium EraThr3 Forward Assist
AXTS Raptor Charging Handle
AXTS Talon Ambi Safety
AR Gold drop in Trigger
-Titanium Takedown pins/mag-catch
Ultra Light Bolt Catch
PWS Enhanced Buffer Tube/ratchet design end plate & castle nut
PWS Mod 2 H2 Buffer at 4.5oz
-Magpul STR Stock & MIAD Grip
Atlas V8 Bipod or FALKOR DEFENSE MANTIS depending on rifle issued
Dueck Defense Rapid Transition Sights

The Grunt
EraThr3’s Sheri Johnson had this to say about the guns, “These 12 rifles were built with a grip of hand selected parts and accessories, some of which being new to us, and provided just for the event in Utah. As a grassroots, custom rifle manufacturer, we’re not married to a specific line of goods or accessories. Maintaining the ability to reach across the table, work with most everybody in the industry, and configure a handful of rifles for an event like this is what we’re all about. There’s always risk in the unknown, yet that seems to be where we’re most comfortable. There was most definitely plenty of that when we committed to putting on a show in the mountains of Utah. Win, lose, or bust, you can bank on the idea that we’re always out to test the limits, regardless of the venue.”

I asked about how the production version of “The Grunt” will be rolled out and EraThr3 CEO Stirling Becklin related this to SSD, “Our objective with the Grunt is to address those end-users who aspire to have the most refined, yet rugged rifle available, and we acknowledge that this limits our customer base to a small fraction of the industry’s make-up. All the better, and we’re proud to be in a class of our own. The Grunt will be available at two price-points, one with a carbon barrel, Ti parts, etc., and another being a sub $3k model with a more standard bill of materials, including a single-point cut 416R stainless barrel, but maintaining the same level of accuracy and attention to detail.”

What’s Up With Those Colors?
The rifles we used at the course were offered in a variety of vibrant colors and Sheri did play a trick on me, initially pairing me with a pink rifle. She told me that the colors were inspired by a box of crayons and sure enough, she included a pack in each rifle case along with a bag of Skittles.

She said, “Production rifles probably aren’t going to ship with a bag of candy, but you never know how things may just stick.” Turns out, the Gray tone on the rifle I used for the event is kind of their trademark color, and is more likely a standard color than any of the others that showed up on Buck’s range.

But Does It Shoot?
Whenever you write about a gun, people obviously want to know if it can shoot. At least with carbines, generally they all do and in this case, yes, it does. At this point in the game, Stoner-style rifles aren’t exactly rocket science and EraThr3 has already been building them for several years. Virtually no expense was spared. Take one look at the rifle’s components and you see that it’s going to work unless they don’t know how to put them together. Like I already said, EraThr3 does.

No torture tests were run on the guns we shot and we didn’t go downrange and measure shotgroups. This was a course on long range gunfighting, like a service member might encounter in Afghanistan; shooting from one ridgeline to another. Once they were zeroed, hits were the evidence of the weapon’s fidelity. The guns worked well. Rather than the weapon, it was the environment we had to contend with for those hits. Temperature swings and shifting winds tested our ability to compensate and the high altitude of the range location drained our bodies. Despite this, the rifle didn’t let me down.

However, I’ll give it all to you; the good, the bad and the ugly. I did have two ammo related malfunctions. No biggie, I applied immediate action, and went right back to it. But this wasn’t like shooting a typical long range course of fire. Although we used 20 rd PMags, we went through a lot of ammunition, engaging targets both near and far.

Additionally, EraThr3 did an awesome job mounting the SureFire WarComps on the PROOF Barrel blanks. The timing was perfect; threaded right on with no need for crush washers. However, they had to learn a thing or two from SureFire about mounting the WarComp to ensure that it would offer correct alignment for a suppressor. Consequently, not every rifle was equipped with a suppressor during the event lest we risk a baffle strike. This stuff happens, and I’d say it had a lot to do with how quickly they built these rifles.

In the end, neither one of these issues detracted from my experience. My goal for attending this event was to see if I could effectively engage targets past 1000 yards with a 5.56mm rifle and with this combination of rifle, optics and ammunition, I could. Mission accomplished.

What’s Next?
As I understand it, most of the rifles we used on the course are going to put up for sale at a discount to benefit some USMC charities in honor of Buck Doyle’s service. I’ll post details as soon as I get them but I can tell you, they’ll go fast.

EraThr3 on Erathr3
I had a great time in Utah and got to do some really fun shooting. This was also the first time I had met anyone from EraThr3 but I think this note they sent me sums them up best, “Call us boutique, niche, crazy, or whatever else makes it easy to recognize our inability to conform to the masses. Truth is, we’re just a handful of misfits out to make our own luck and do what makes us happy. It’s what started the madness, and is sure to drive us into the future.”

Shout out to DEFCON Group for the images!

Follow Through Consulting – Weapon Grip For Rapid Movement

Thursday, April 21st, 2016

This week I got to spend some time out in Utah with Buck Doyle, owner of Follow Through Consulting. Buck is very well known and respected in the Marine Reconnaissance and MARSOC communities, as well as industry. I expected to learn a lot from him and he did not disappoint.

One quick takeaway I picked up during the scoped carbine course he presented for hosts Proof Research, Erathr3, Leupold and Surefire, was this weapon grip for fast movement. I thought it was a great, quick share because anyone can easily adopt it on their own.

In the Army, I was taught to carry my rifle in a modified port arms by wrapping the fingers of my firing hand around the pistol grip with my trigger finger extended along the lower receiver above the trigger. Alternatively, I’ve seen guys extend their finger across the trigger with their fingertip resting on the magwell, as seen above. Additionally, I was taught to position my support hand under the forearm with my finger and thumb holding it securely.

Buck was taught the same thing in the Marine Corps. But the realities of combat taught him to modify this grip. Twice, he injured his trigger finger during falls in combat while rushing from one position to another. The first time he dislocated his finger and on the second, he sprained it. He said the sprain was worse because it took longer to heal. Once Buck started wrapping all of his fingers around the pistol grip, he didn’t injure it again.

I told Buck, “That makes sense for the firing hand, but what gives with the upside down grip on the support hand?” He told me that this method of carry served two functions. First, it serves the four rules of firearms safery quite well. It forces the muzzle down in a safe direction during movements. If you stumble, you won’t bring your muzzle up in the air like you would with the more tradtional port-style carry. Second, you can more naturally pull the weapon down into yourself in a full fall.

An important note. Buck adopted this technique for moving rapidly (ie running) while in combat. He fully acknowledges that you will have to transition your grip to shoot your weapon.

One of the things I find most refreshing about Buck Doyle is that there’s no BS. I talked to him about the grip and asked him what he called it. Unlike many tactical trainers, he didn’t have some fancy, trademarked name for it. For Buck, this wasn’t some theory-based technique he had dreamed up, but was based on years of actual combat as a Marine. It’s just an adaptation of a long-standing technique for use in certain circumstances. That’s the kind of thing you take away.

For those curious, the rifle is by Erathr3 with a PROOF Research barrel. The scope is Leupold and furniture by Magpul. More on all of that soon, but yes, I was hitting steel at 1164 meters with this 5.56mm package.

If you’re interested in learning more about Follow Through Consulting, visit www.followthroughconsulting.com.