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Posts Tagged ‘Military Child Education Coalition’

April Designated Month of the Military Child

Thursday, April 5th, 2018

April is the Month of the Military Child, a time to recognize and appreciate military children for their service and sacrifice. Military children live with on-going challenges presented by frequent moves, family separations, and life transitions. They move 6-9 times during their K-12 years. In their own way, military-connected children serve, too.

As a demographic, military-connected children number almost 4 million, 75% of whom are school-age. Almost every school district in America includes military-connected children and youth whose parents serve or served in the Active, Guard, and Reserve components of the Armed Forces. Over 80% of these students attend U.S. public schools while less than 8% attend Department of Defense schools.

The Military Child Education Coalition (MCEC) works to address the needs of military-connected children through programs, services, and resources designed to enlighten and empower parents, educators, other supportive adults and the students themselves. After more than a decade of war, the well-being of all military-connected children and youth depends on a strong, consistent network of supportive adults. Parents, teachers, mentors, and role models play a pivotal role in the life of a military child.

You can make a difference in the life of a military child by seeking opportunities to acknowledge their sacrifice, volunteering for organizations that support them, and recognizing their contribution to the nation. MCEC invites everyone to wear purple on Friday, April 13th, as a visible gesture of support for military kids, and to financially support MCEC in our endeavors to ensure military-connected students overcome challenges to become college, workforce and life-ready.

The Military Child Education Coalition serves the children of those who serve us all and encourages efforts that strengthen our military children and ensure opportunities for their quality education.

To learn more, visit MilitaryChild.org.