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Posts Tagged ‘Pat McNamara’

American Gunfighter Episode 3 – Pat McNamara, TMACS – Presented by BCM

Monday, December 1st, 2014

BCM is proud to feature Pat McNamara in the third episode of our ongoing series, American Gunfighter. American Gunfighter has given been a unique opportunity to pull back the veil and highlight both the history and motivations of the instructors in our BCMGUNFIGHTER program.

Pat McNamara has 22 years of Special Operations experience, 13 of which were in 1st SFOD-D. He has extensive experience in hostile fire/combat zones in the Middle East, and Eastern Europe. Today, he trains individuals at basic and advanced levels of marksmanship and combat tactics. He retired in 2005 from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major. But that is only a small part of the story. Watch to learn the rest.

www.tmacsinc.com

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, November 15th, 2014

We guys are notorious for practicing what we are good at. It gives a warm and fuzzy. I’ve made mention of this in the past and have encouraged folks to include more strong hand training in their range time. It is an elusive way to bridge the gap and to sneak off of a plateau.

I have modified the National Match course of fire and have included it in my current curriculum. This is a great bang for the buck drill.

The course of fire is as follows; Use an IPSC target. Firing lines are at 50 yards and twenty five yards.

Course of fire is shot in three strings.

String one is slow fire five rounds from the 50 strong hand only

String two is timed fire from the 25 yard line. Five shots, from the holster, strong hand only in twenty seconds

String three is rapid fire from the 25 yard line. Five shots, from the holster, strong hand only in 10 seconds.

It is a 75 point course of fire.

The scoring system I use is to deduct one point for ‘C’ zone or head shots. Deduct two points for ‘D’ zone hits. Deduct five points for misses.

Way more forgiving than the National Match course of fire but works well for varied skill sets. Good use of fifteen rounds.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

I recently started to re-incorporate ‘Calling Your Shot’ drills into my Basic Rifle Marksmanship (BRM) curriculum.

Knowing where the sites are when the hammer falls is not only good marksmanship training but a liability concern and a tactical necessity. We must know whether the shot is good or not, before the rounds impacts the target.

One should perform this drill at a distance where he cannot see the impact of the round register on the paper target. So,…50-100 yards.

One should also reduce the amount of stability in one’s shooting platform to increase his wobble area. There for, prone position is out. Use an alternate position like sitting, kneeling or standing.

Use a marksmanship data book or a simple notebook with your target drawn in it. Fire five rounds. After each round, annotate on your drawn target where you believe that round hit your target.

After the five round group, compare your note pad to your target. Your notes and target do not have to be an exact match. For example; if you called two high, two low and one left, and if your target’s feedback mirrors your notes, you have succeeded in this drill.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

Being able to perform focal shift is a skill we sometimes neglect to practice on the range. I call this being omni-cognizant. Learning to see things full spectrum while performing a focal shift is a necessary skill and easy to neglect as we get sucked into the flat range training mindset. We should train ourselves to train our eyes. At a minimum, to perform a focal shift from our sights to the fight and from the fight to reference points beyond the fight. A way to exercise our eyes is by using a Brock String (easy to find instructions on the web). This is easy to build and easy to use. A Brock string (named after Frederick W. Brock) is an instrument used in vision therapy. It consists of a white string of approximately 10 feet in length with three small wooden beads of different colors.

The Brock string is commonly employed during treatment of convergence insufficiency and other anomalies of binocular vision sometimes developed by those of us who work strictly one eye on the range. It is used to develop skills of convergence as well as to disrupt suppression of one of the eyes. It is worth the few dollars on wooden balls, spray paint and string.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, July 26th, 2014

Social media has informed me that lots of people do not like LEOs. I have been bombarded by film clips of cops tuning up some POS. Sometimes the clips have subtitles or are put to music or include a narrative. A recent one was narrated by that pinko douche nugget Bill Maher. In his lefty diatribe, he pissed and moaned about how abusive LEOs are and referred to them as Jack Booted Thugs, because they wear assault kit. His rant included video clips of ass whoopings. As I watch these clips, one thing comes to my mind… 95% of the time, that is: “That shit licker deserved it.”

If I ever put my cops in a position where they have to question whether or not I am hostile, or compliant, because there is a clear distinction, I deserve to get throttled. If I am resisting arrest, and if I am not beaten to within an inch of my life by my LEOs, I will think of them as pussies.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, June 21st, 2014

“Albert Einstein” Drill

I’ve got a new drill that I run on line and it’s been tough for me to put the proper vernacular to it. The drill is prefaced by asking where we should stand, time-wise, as far as single shot from the holster at 10 yards.

Opinions and answers vary, as they should. I then propose to set up timers on a par of 2.5 seconds and ask shooters to pick a zone on an IPSC target where they know, without a shadow of a doubt, they can maintain consistency. The zones are ‘A’ Credit Card Head, ‘B’ Head, ‘A’ Body, ‘C’ zone, or entire target. I tell shooters to outline their zone with a sharpie and stay in it for five consecutive, 2.5 second, single shot draw strokes.

The objective is not only to stay in it, but to strive to achieve better.

Thanks to Albert Einstein for assisting me in amending the verbiage for this course of fire; “One must develop an instinct for what one can barely achieve through one’s greatest efforts. Mark the boundary of your current ability, and aim a little beyond it.”

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, May 31st, 2014

I occasionally get push back or skepticism during courses when I have guys utilize the rifle’s safety while doing mag changes up close at say…7-10 yards. So I present them with this situation; you and I are fighting side by side from behind cover. The fight is mid-range. The cover is small. This is close quarters. I am within inches of you while performing a magazine change, or while moving around you to better my position. At times my muzzle may be oriented over your bow. Do you want me to use my rifle’s safety? I’m thinking your answer will be “Yes”.

If we are fighting together in close quarters, not only do I want you to use your safety while working alongside of me, but I am hoping that your safety manipulation is spontaneous.

Push back comes from those too lazy to perform the appropriate amount of meaningful repetitions until safety manipulation becomes an intuitive task or until one can perform this at a subconscious level.

If you can’t think to ‘Safe it’ at seven, what makes you think…you can think to do it instinctively, in close quarters?

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He also served as the Principle of TMACS Inc.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, March 15th, 2014

IMG_0515

Preparedness not Paranoia

My in and around car for day to day use is pretty non-descript. I’ve got no flashy in plain view inside worth stealing and “Kill ‘Em All” stickers plastered on the outside.

The items in my trunk are for when “Shit’s Gone South”. It would have to be a really bad day if I’ve got to deploy and employ my items, but I’d rather have and not need than to need and not have. If an active shooter is reaping havoc in a venue where my kids are, and if my local guys are not on the scene, I am going into that crisis site like a scalded ape.

The big dumb reflective vest is to separate me from the shit head in the venue. The rifle’s sight has cross hairs as well as bats (in the event the bats shit the bed). The battle bag has eight loaded mags. Inside of the battle bag I’ve got water, eyes, ears and lube. In the Day and a half bag I’ve got more “Shoot, Move, Communicate and Medicate.” I’ve got also, grease pencils, multi tool, chem lights, reading glasses (that’s right), lighter, 550 cord, and a few other nick knacks.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting).

Gunfighter Moment – Pat McNamara

Saturday, March 1st, 2014

Members of Law Enforcement and the military have a job to protect and serve others. At times, they need to think about themselves and their team mates as well. Combat effectiveness is not limited to gun skills. Being physically fit is non-negotiable in the tactical arena. We are all built differently and have accrued miles of varying numbers. Some of us have been broken and repaired, battered and bruised through an abusive work style or ageism. Some LEOs work horrible shifts and can’t muster the motivation to better themselves physically. If you are strapping forty pounds of lightweight shit onto an already gelatinous mess of cottage cheese, you are not only less effective in the field but are a detriment and a liability to your teammates and to those who you need to protect. Make a functional PT program part of your normal. Much can be achieved in thirty minutes daily to ensure you can leap a five foot wall in full kit, run 400 meters and body slam a douche nugget fleeing from a crime scene.

Patrick McNamara
SGM, US Army (Ret)

McNamara_pistol
Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting).

tmacsinc.com

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

FIREClean – Pat McNamara + KAC SR-16

Friday, February 7th, 2014

It’s always fun to watch Pat McNamara at work and in the above video, he wields a custom 1911 to demonstrate a ‘turn and burn’ drill at 10, 15, and 20 yards. In the time leading up to the drill seen here, Pat put 2500 rounds through that same pistol, which was treated with FIREClean, cleaning it only just prior to the drill.

This bonus video shows the results of using FIREClean on a KAC 11.5″ select-fire SR-16 Direct-Impingement carbine. 3000 rounds of 5.56 ammunition were run through the gun, and it received no additional oiling or cleaning, only an initial treatment with FIREClean. All shots were suppressed, mostly fully-automatic fire.

Impressive? I think so.

www.cleanergun.com