FN Herstal

Triggrcon 18 – TriggerShield by Richetti Tactical Solutions

When I first saw TriggerShield at Triggrcon Range Day, I was understandably skeptical. It’s a hinged cover for the trigger to help avoid negligent discharges. Below, you see a prototype mounted to a Blue Gun.

Initially, TriggerShield is available for the AR family and mounted to both left and right sides of the rifle. Its spring loaded design doesn’t rotate upward more than 90 degrees so as not to over stress the springs. Additionally, it’s mounted to the weapon via replacement trigger pins. In this photo of inventor Ryan Richetti, you can see how the TriggerShield swings out of the way.

I fired a rifle with a TriggerShield mounted. I was surprised how easy it was to get to the trigger when I wanted.

While I am concerned that’s it’s a hardware solution to a software problem, I can see certain applications where it might be useful. I’m sure many in the Law Enforcement community would be against its use, but as it can be applied to a wide variety of firearms, it could be applied to weapons carried while in close proximity to bystanders. Additionally, some may want to use TriggerShield to avoid getting their trigger caught on equipment.

If anything, the device encourages debate.

shop.rtstriggershield.com

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22 Responses to “Triggrcon 18 – TriggerShield by Richetti Tactical Solutions”

  1. JM Gavin says:

    I’m not sure that the device encourages debate. The only people that seem to think it’s a good idea are the manufacturers.

  2. Db says:

    Poor and unnecessary “hardware solution to a software problem.” People are designing things just to design things. This is an infomercial product.

  3. Jack Griffin says:

    So it’s a Kydex holster for a slung weapon that has a selector switch.

  4. SShink says:

    I could imagine a negligent discharge happening from just fumbling around with this thing

  5. SLG says:

    I won’t say that it is a good solution, but I’d be willing to try it out before condemning it. A few issues come to mind. 1. Accessing the trigger via a different route than every other gun we ever use, that is, up from the bottom, rather than down from the top. This could also lead to failing to shoot in time or at all, under stress.
    2. Possibly having your finger get pinned in the trigger guard under some unforeseen circumstance.
    3. Who knows, I’m just spitballing.

    • Callmespot says:

      Breaking and sticking against trigger on any full auto gun?

      Breaking around supplied tigger pins? Causing trigger issues.

      I think there should be grip sensor that causes the doors to automatically open!! And the close whe released! Kidding of course.

      Maybe add a rear sight to it when open can turn the rifle 90 degrees and fire along that axis….hey just a thought.

  6. chariborne says:

    I see as unnecessary for several reasons
    1. more weight to the gun
    2. Not a standard piece of kit
    3. someone mentioned this is a training problem there are some truth to that
    4. 50 bucks? less money for training

  7. Dave says:

    now you can run the gun on fire 24/7, no need mess with the safety anymore because that takes to long

  8. Prevents ND’s – if you don’t want to press the trigger, don’t press the trigger

    • Will says:

      Exactly! Low tech and cost effective solution to the ND problem.

      This is a solution looking for a problem. I was recently involved with an AFRL Tech Warrior event where a vendor had an arm-band type device that analyzed your sweat. Short version was that the wearable sensor analyzed the users sweat to see if the user was hydrated. The COA was that a squad leader could pull up his squad on a tablet/phone/device and check out his squads hydration levels. I asked “what else does it do, and how much does it cost?” Answer: “nothing else and $100+”. To which I replied, “a good squad leader who has situational awareness can halt his squad, have them take a knee, and make them hydrate…that’s low tech and free.”

    • SSD says:

      Sometimes other things press the trigger and that’s really what this is intended to mitigate.

      • bloke_from_ohio says:

        Isn’t that what the selector switch is for?

        • Catherine says:

          Yes, until your kit catches on the selector and flips it off safe, which does happen. Rare, but it only takes one time to become paranoid over the safety.

  9. Richie says:

    I would say this would train new shooters to keep their finger over the center of the trigger area, if they picked up a different gun it would go straight to the trigger.

    A better device for safety training would be this but with an added capacitive sensor that beeps if you rest your finger where it shouldnt be.

    As for an ND or some kind of failure locking your finger in (or out) of place, it looks way too simple for that, and the forward action of moving your finger underneath should not create a pulling action on the trigger

  10. ED says:

    I see no use for this particular item. In any situation. I see a failing part keeping you from firing your weapon when its needed. If people really want to engineer something. Look at where technology has room for movement on firearms. i.e. ammunition,sighting systems, & 3D printable devices.

    PS somebody please build a viable GUAS gun lol.

  11. N says:

    I like this for your non dominate hand side, so left side for most of us. Could really cut down on AD/NDs during transitions to pistol and stuff like that. I heard about someone from my service that either forgot to put his rifle on safe or it got switched back to fire somehow and the trigger got caught on his kit during a transition to pistol and blew hi

  12. N says:

    I like this for your non dominate hand side, so left side for most of us. Could really cut down on AD/NDs during transitions to pistol and stuff like that. I heard about someone from my service that either forgot to put his rifle on safe or it got switched back to fire somehow and the trigger got caught on his kit during a transition to pistol and blew his knee out.

    For the right side? I will reserve judgment until I can see it in person but I can’t think of very many instances where it would be worth it.