SureFire

Oral I.V. Supports 30th Annual Best Ranger Competition at Fort Benning

Oral I.V. and Warrior Wound Care are proud to have supported the 2013 Best Ranger Competition, which recently took place at Fort Benning, Georgia. Warrior Wound Care supplied Oral I.V. hydration solution to all 100 participants for the 30th anniversary of this grueling competition, which has evolved from one originally created to salute the best two-man “buddy” team in the Ranger Department at Fort Benning to determine the best two-man team from the entire United States Armed Forces. The Best Ranger Competition is a U.S. Army event and supported by The National Ranger Association, Inc.

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Major Nathan M. Setka, Ranger Brigade Surgeon, stated in a letter of appreciation to Warrior Wound Care:

“During both the 2012 and 2013 competitions, Warrior Wound Care provided an individual aid kit featuring Oral I.V. rehydration formula to each competitor, as well as Oral I.V. packages for the medical staff and support cadre. The 2012 event was the first time that there were no reported heat or dehydration injuries or illness. In the 2013 Best Ranger Competition for the second year employing Oral I.V., the competitors suffered no dehydration or heat-related injuries during this most grueling and physically exhaustive event, open only to the most prepared and elite soldiers of the U.S. Armed Forces.”

The Oral I.V. proprietary formula is based on the science of hydration, one of the most fundamental drivers of human performance. Oral I.V. provides the critical electrolytes and minerals the body needs and nothing else – no caffeine, sugars, stimulants, preservatives, additives or artificial flavors. Due to their crystalloid form, the electrolytes in Oral I.V. are absorbed in the body directly upon contact with mucous membranes, creating an immediately noticeable improvement in performance for demanding operations and long-term or explosive short-term exercise. Oral I.V. restores proper blood sugar levels and promotes correct blood volume, resulting in higher energy levels, heightened concentration and alertness, faster recovery from injury or strenuous exercise, and much more.

The Oral I.V. product is now available via GSA Advantage, the government’s premier online shopping system, at www.gsaadvantage.gov. Customers can also purchase Oral I.V. under the Warrior Wound Care GSA schedule (GSA Contract V797D-30120) by contacting [email protected].

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2 Responses to “Oral I.V. Supports 30th Annual Best Ranger Competition at Fort Benning”

  1. Sal Palma says:

    I would like to open my comments by stating that I do not have a vested interest in either Wounded Warrior Care or Oral I.V.; in their success or failure as companies or in their products.
    However, I do have a problem with Major Setka’s endorsement for a number of reasons.
    The issue of proper hydration is not a simple matter. As healthy athletic individuals, your intra and extra cellular functions are carefully regulated through a biochemical process known as homeostasis. Through a series of complex biochemical pathways your bodies regulate themselves; including how much water is absorbed and the rate of that absorption. In extreme environments or extreme levels of activity more water is needed. Electrolytes facilitate your body’s absorption of fluids in the digestive track. Given a good diet, your body has all of the electrolytes it needs it then simply needs water to keep your systems functioning properly. So, the key to hydration is a reasonable diet and regular intake of water.
    Concentrated electrolytes are generally used only in pre and post-surgical procedures and in cases of severe dehydration. There are also hazards associated with concentrated electrolytes particularly where potassium is involved.
    The majority of concentrated electrolyte formulations on the market are listed as dietary supplements; as such, there are no clinical trial requirements under FDA guidelines and manufacturers are free to claim, within reason, anything about their product performance.
    Major Setka’s endorsement is in appropriate and leads the reader to believe that using Oral I.V. accounts for no heat–related injuries.
    “The 2012 event was the first time that there were no reported heat or dehydration injuries or illness. In the 2013 Best Ranger Competition for the second year employing Oral I.V., the competitors suffered no dehydration or heat-related injuries during this most grueling and physically exhaustive event, open only to the most prepared and elite soldiers of the U.S. Armed Forces.”
    Major Setka, I respectfully submit that ambient temperatures, or the hydration practices of participants could account for that observation. Your observation may very well be accurate but where is your control group, etc. Your comment is equivalent to the U.S. Army endorsing the FN SCAR over the Beretta AX-160

  2. Canadian says:

    I have looked all over, and found no reliable peer-reviewed studies showing that this is anything but a gimmick. All individual reviews are entirely anecdotal.