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Archive for the ‘Medical’ Category

SureFire Field Notes Ep 52 with Kerry Davis

Friday, December 27th, 2019

In this episode, Kerry Davis discusses the importance of not only carrying an IFAK, but having solid medical training.

Kerry Davis founder of Dark Angel Medical, has been taking care of people more than half of his adult life. Born and raised in Mississippi, he joined the US Air Force in 1991 and trained as a medic, working in an ER, then moving on to special duty with the only Tac Evac unit in the active USAF. In that station he was a flight medic and an Aircrew Training instructor.

That duty station gave Kerry the opportunity to go to the U.S. Army’s Airborne school and work with Airborne units at Pope AFB and Ft. Bragg.  After leaving North Carolina, he moved to Maxwell AFB, AL, where he instructed several thousand new Air Force officers at Officer Training School’s Medical Readiness Indoctrination Course at Gunter AFB Annex over a two and a half year period.

Kerry also taught, during his tenure in the USAF, ACLS, PALS, BCLS and Paramedic Cardiology. During that time he worked as a paramedic and after separation from the Air Force, he completed his training and certification as an RN.  He has now been in the Critical Care and ER field since 2003. He separated from the Reserves in 2007. He is an avid shooter and has instructed with Magpul Dynamics.  Today he is currently an adjunct instructor with SIG Sauer Academy where he teaches weapons manipulation as well as “Bullets and Bandages”.

darkangelmedical.com

www.surefire.com

UF PRO – K9 Tactical Field Care Episode 2

Tuesday, December 24th, 2019

Sneak Peek – The Ankle from LMS Gear x Black Lion Gear

Tuesday, December 17th, 2019

Coming this week from LMS Gear, in conjunction with Black Lion Gear, the Ankle, featuring six elastic pockets for carrying EDC or medical gear. Made in Germany with US materials.

UF PRO – K9 Care Under Fire

Monday, December 9th, 2019

UF PRO continues their video training series with a lesson on caring for a wounded K9 while under fire.

Sign up for a K9 morale patch offer.

Air Force Research Labs Enhances Safety of Survival Specialists Through Wearable Health Monitoring Technology

Friday, December 6th, 2019

WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, Ohio –An Air Force Research Laboratory team recently delivered version 2.0 of the Survival Health Awareness Responders Kit (SHARK) to U.S. Air Force instructors at Joint Base San Antonio (JBSA)-Lackland Camp Bullis, a 28,000-acre site in Texas, used to train Survival, Evasion, Resistance and Escape (SERE) specialists.

With SHARK, sensors embedded in shirts transmit key metrics including heart rate and estimated core temperature from smartphones to a server. As students undergo physical endurance tests during extended periods of isolation, the system allows instructors to monitor this data in real-time, and issues alerts for heart rate spikes and significant increases in temperature. Since the device identifies the user’s location, medical personnel can quickly respond to those in need of care.

2nd Lt. Matthew Dickinson, a biomechanical engineer within AFRL’s 711th Human Performance Wing (HPW), says that SHARK 2.0 is user-friendly and more secure. He explains that instructors and students alike are pleased with the streamlined setup process and the new web interface.

The commander of Detachment 3, 66th Training Squadron, Maj. Toby Andrews, said he appreciates that SHARK “gives [instructors] real-time alerts on the health and well-being of students.” The system “truly eases my mind as a commander,” he said since it “allows us to provide preventative care [in cases] that could otherwise lead to serious medical situations.”

Prior to SHARK, instructors checked on trainees at regular intervals to ensure their well-being. In certain cases, they administer ice baths to students with elevated body temperatures, said Tech. Sgt. John Garcia, a SERE instructor. However, since the introduction of this monitoring technology, zero ice baths have been required because the system alerts instructors before students reach what they call “the danger zone.”

To develop version 2.0, the SHARK team enlisted the help of Cedarville University students majoring in computer science. Loren Baum, who now works full-time in 711HPW, improved the code for his senior design project.  He optimized the software, added functionality, enhanced the security measures and streamlined the startup process.

Baum explains that the team moved SHARK from the mobile app arena to the web to make the system useable in a wider variety of scenarios. With the new approach, instructors simply log into a website from any computer to monitor students’ health status instead of launching an application, which requires installation and manual upgrades.

The team simplified the startup process with Quick Response (QR) codes that automatically input students’ information when scanned, Baum said. This measure reduced the total setup time from one hour to five minutes, and makes it easier for students and instructors to begin a new session.

In June 2019, the team traveled to JBSA-Camp Bullis and conducted initial tests with version 2.0. Once the team integrated additional software improvements, SERE instructors officially launched the upgrade in September.

The SHARK team continues to work with other squadron key leaders to address related needs. One such application involves using the included heart rate variability measurement to provide real-time feedback regarding students’ reactions to various training stressors.

This data would enable instructors to evaluate the effectiveness of interrogation techniques and determine the extent to which they affect individuals, said 1st Lt. David Feibus, a former software team lead, who is now a student at the Air Force Institute of Technology.

While SHARK is useful in various situations, Air Force instructors currently rely on this tool to offer “strenuous exercises in the safest manner possible,” said Ted Harmer, a 711HPW engineer who also leads a medical readiness personnel recovery training research team. When administering physical tests, instructors must achieve the purpose of the training and minimize negative impacts, whether they be physical or emotional, he explains.

Leadership from AFRL’s 711th Human Performance Wing originally learned about this need for additional safety measures during a visit to the USAF Survival School at Fairchild Air Force Base. School personnel explained that they needed a more proactive solution to monitor students’ health and performance during their rigorous training missions. Due to the ongoing research and development of wearable monitoring technologies in the 711HPW, experts decided the SERE training environment was another place this monitoring technology could improve the safety of SERE students and enhance their training program.

“Going in, we knew we needed a broad range of skillsets,” said Dr. James Christensen, a product line lead within the 711HPW. He explains that to produce an effective system, the team relied on expertise in wearable devices, electronics, software development, communications, human factors and physiology.

“We pulled together capabilities from several different parts of the organization to assemble the sensors, develop the software to pull sensor data together, and then build the communications capability to then send that data and be able to monitor it continuously and remotely.”

Following the initial design and development, the team arranged field tests with end-users. Several team members lived with JBSA-Camp Bullis instructors for one week to test SHARK 1.0 in 2018. Now, a year later, an upgraded system is in the field.

In the meantime, the SHARK team is also working with other groups who are interested in acquiring this technology including firefighters, NASA scientists and U.S. Army Special Forces. Members are currently exploring a version of the system that the Department of Defense Fire Academy can use under fire protection gear to prevent heat injuries.

U.S. Air Force Staff Sgt. Randall Moss and U.S. Air Force Master Sgt. William Davis, loadmasters assigned to the 16th Airlift Squadron, sort through survival equipment during a survival, evasion, resistance, and escape exercise August 21, 2019, in North, South Carolina. SERE specialists assigned to the 437th Operations Support Squadron conducted this exercise in order to identify potential areas of improvement in both SERE training and equipment provided to aircrew in case of a potential isolating event. (U.S. Air Force photo/Airman 1st Class Duncan C. Bevan)

2020 International Tactical Medicine Competition Registrations Opens 12/1/19 at 1200 EST

Wednesday, November 27th, 2019

REGISTRATION OPENS 12/1/19 at 1200 EST2020 International Tactical Medicine Competition

The International Tactical Medic Competition is an event created to allow tactical medical providers from around the world the opportunity to collaborate and compete in a community of peers. Civilian Tactical Medicine is a relatively new topic within the world of pre-hospital medicine. ITMC creates opportunities to increase awareness, collaboration and training. This competition is a great opportunity to bring like minded individuals together, and support a cause greater than self.

NOW ACCEPTING SPONSORS
For more information visit
www.TACMEDCOMPETITION.com

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Drinking Saltwater

Sunday, November 24th, 2019

I know most people will never be on a boat that sinks and be in the situation, whereas they would have to try and survive by drinking saltwater. First, don’t drink saltwater it will kill you. But there might come a time that you are on are out in the field for a long time, and you have to find water, and its either get it from the ocean or possible from a river or swap that has brackish water (half salt/ half fresh). The best method is to have a pump with you that can be used for saltwater. It will be a lot of work pumping saltwater and turning it into fresh is a lot of work for a little reward. There is also a way to get clean water out of saltwater that uses a leaching method that you can fill and forget. HTI uses Osmosis is the natural diffusion of water through a semi-permeable membrane from a solution containing a low concentration of dissolved solids to a solution having a higher level of dissolved solids. When it comes to the best method for you that depends on the situation, I am going to talk about a few different techniques and also suggest a few things you can just buy and keep around.

 

 

Getting salt out of seawater requires the following essential components. It doesn’t matter what you do to accomplish this, but they should be as clean as posable.

1. Method of evaporation

2. Something to catch condensation

3. A way to collect the condensation back into a substantial container.

There are a lot of things you can use to accomplish this, and during a real survival situation, knowing the necessary actions will go a long way. You should always carry the right items, so if you find yourself in this situation, it will make it a lot easier. All of this will go a long way and could save your life. You should always have items to purify water on your boat because you never know what will happen. You can have this in your boat, and if you need it, it is there.

 

Above is a basic Solar still, you can even just put a plastic bag on green vegetation and collect water that way.

This can be accomplished with a poncho also. Beach well. Along the coast, obtain water by digging a beach well. If you are near a beach you can go back on the beach or inland a little bit and dig a beach well, let it fill with water and drain it at least three times before you drink it. It should be boiled or treated.

 

There was an 18year old kid from Indonesia that survived 49 days on a tiny fishing boat, and he used his clothes to filter the water thru to make it (more) drinkable. He used his cotton shirt and drank the water thru it. Some studies have shown that filtering water through a sari, is a garment that is commonly worn by women in the Indian subcontinent, can significantly increase its potability. In 2003, scientists discovered that filtering water from rivers and ponds in Bangladesh through a folded piece of cotton cloth taken from a sari cut the risk of infection with cholera by half. Interestingly, they noted that old fabric makes for a better filter than new material because the pore size of loose threads is smaller.

In a follow-up study in 2015, researchers found that a filter made of four layers of worn cotton material could filter out more than 99 percent of all cholera bacteria.

One of the biggest things to remember in a survival situation is, do not eat if you don’t have water. If you have water available to you, you should try and filter it as much as possible. But if it comes to, I am going to die if I don’t drink the water. Well, most survival experts say to drink it. (that only counts for freshwater not water with salt in it) When you are rescued, a lot of what you can get from drinking bad water can be treated.

 

ITS Releases an All-New Bleeding Management Kit

Friday, October 25th, 2019

ARLINGTON, TX, 10/28/2019] Imminent Threat Solutions is proud to release a compact solution for treating the number one cause of preventable death, extremity hemorrhage, aka traumatic bleeding. This kit was designed to fulfill the requirements for a kit to control bleeding that many states across the country are now mandating in schools, government buildings and other public venues.

All components of the Bleeding Management Kit™ are stored inside the proven ITS Nylon Zip Bag and sealed with one of the breakaway tamper-evident ITS Security Seals. This provides peace of mind that if your kit is stored in a publicly accessible location, a quick glance will let you know it’s still sealed.

Additionally, the ITS Bleeding Management Kit™ fits perfectly into a desk drawer, backpack or even tucked inside a wall-mounted defibrillator case commonly found in buildings.

Imminent Threat Solutions provides indispensable skill-sets and products to explore your world and prevail against all threats.

For more information on ITS Medical products, please visit store.itstactical.com/collections/medical