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FirstSpear Friday Focus – MIKE Force Pack

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For this week’s Friday Focus, we’re taking a look at the long-awaited MIKE Force Pack. Taking its name from MACV-SOG’s famed MIKE (Mobile Strike) Force during the Vietnam War, this jungle pack utilizes advanced construction and fabric technology, and is optimized for loads in the 60 lbs range.

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Currently, there are three different sized waist belts available for the MFP Suspension System.  Swapping them out is a cinch. The MIKE frame is one size fits most, and manufactured from an advanced thermal molded composition. For personnel not immediately familiar with pack systems designed for operations in heavily foliated, tropical environments, the frame may initially seem to ride high, however there is ample adjustment to raise and lower it on the body. The design intent is to minimize conflict with your load bearing/fighting load, accentuate stand off from the back of the body to aid in ventilation/cooling, and facilitate getting in and out of different body positions required for Jungle Warfare.

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The MIKE Force Pack features two external pockets positioned on the outside, back center to aid in organization and provide access to smaller immediately needed items. An overstuff skirt is manufactured of lightweight/compressible material that is highly water resistant. The top flap of the pack is completely removable and features an accessory strap letting you use it as a Bolt Bag. An internal radio pocket can securely hold the AN/PRC-117G or dense, heavier items that are desired to be transported high and close to the back. Additionally, two Sleeves on the inner, side walls of the pack will each hold a 3 Liter ‘On The Move’ drinking bladder, and are aligned with pass-through ports that allow the drinking hose to be accessed without having to open the pack. These same ports can be used for communication wires or antennas.

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There are also specially-designed load-carrying accessories for the MFP that secure on to the pack via FirstSpear’s proprietary Tubes technology, adding additional carrying capacity without having to switch to a larger bag. These pouches are ingenious and include the QD Side Pockets, both Small and Large as well as the LAW Adapter Kit.

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The MIKE Force Pack is currently available in two sizes, Standard and Medium. The Standard is 2500 cu in, with exterior pockets. The Medium is 2900+ cu in, and features a slick exterior and beaver tail, and is taller than the Standard. Sounds like we’ll eventually see a Large as well.  The two packs share the same yolk, waist belt, and frame.

Available in Black, Coyote, MultiCam, and Ranger Green.

MIKE Force Pack – Standard

MIKE Force Pack – Medium

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11 Responses to “FirstSpear Friday Focus – MIKE Force Pack”

  1. Historia says:

    I would like to see LTC Baldwin test this pack.

  2. 11B says:

    Realistically though, who has a 60lb load these days? It’s a cool looking pack but my squads average loads were in the 100 lb range; seems very niche.

    • paul says:

      Just pack lighter.

      • royced59 says:

        Pack smarter, not harder

        • lcpl1066 says:

          Cowards, thats who weighs in at 60. In all seriousness, I feel a lot of companies undersell their load carriage capacity. Most hiking boots claim to be for loads around 35 lbs. I know I can carry 100 lbs in my Camelback 3 day pack. I would expect similar quality from first spear.

          • lcpl1066 says:

            “Optimized for loads in the 60-Pound range certain features in this system will ensure that when required, excessive loads can be managed.”

            From First Spear website. The side pockets shown are also sold separately. This puts the price point in the high 600s. I would like to see if the LAW adapter kit can hold a 60mm tube or Cal G rounds.

    • nothanks says:

      Sounds like the ubiquitous combination of poorly-trained soldiers following the “nothing inessential left behind” checklists of seasoned AOR-CYA O’s who are at the root of the “poorly-trained” conundrum.

      • nothanks says:

        …and I should add that this pack, in medium, has a stated weight of 3.9lbs.
        Bravo, First Spear.
        I salute you for moving us one step away from tolerating 8,9 and even 10 lbs (empty!) that folks are humping around. If the carbon fiber frame can withstand real-world abuse, this is going to be one highly sought after pack. I will wait for the large and hopefully olive drab variant and some user feedback on the frame. A pack like this will find use well beyond the jungle.

  3. Dellis says:

    On a backpacking trip we would pick one person to secretly load up at each rest stop. We get lighter, they trail behind a few hundred yards wondering why in the hell their pack is so heavy.

  4. Ryan says:

    People underestimate the worth of a pack that doesn’t touch the majority of your back.

    Northern Australia, real tropics and crazy humidity this pack is very similar in design to Platatac Tropical Spur frame wise.

    I just wish they would incorporate these designs into larger packs.

    Who carries lots of weight? Average full marching order pack for 7+ days can weigh in and around 24kg without even trying to over pack.