FN Herstal

High Angle Solutions – CTOMS – TRACE Systems Authorized Trainer Course

TRACE Course Photo 1

The TRACE Systems Authorized Trainer Course is a 5 day program that covers advanced use of TRACE Systems. Topics include professional and hasty rescue systems with 1 and 2 person loads, guiding lines, high lines with reeves, multi-pitch work climbing, glacier travel and crevasse rescue among other topics. The 5 days of training will bring a unit/agency’s instructor cadre to the Authorized TRACE Systems Trainer level for the agency, and Instructor level for the Instructors, authorizing them to teach basic and advanced use to their unit after completing the online pre-course/pre-use packages. This course is ideal for military units requiring complex terrain negotiation, law enforcement special tactics units and even civil Search and Rescue Team. TRACE Systems is not to replace traditional systems, but to fill a gap, provide a light weight alternative, without compromise of safety or capability, when traditional systems are weigh prohibitive.

TRACE Course Photo 5

Venue’s for the training can be urban, mountain or a mixture of both depending on the agency’s mission requirements. A typical course will start with a day of basics, getting into the details and the importance of specific progression in the training when running a course. Glacier travel and crevasse rescue can be taught on a tower or rock. A glacier is not a key component to learning the systems. Two days of rescue systems follow learning professional rescue with one and two rescuers. Included in those days is high lines that can be used with a reeve for rescue, or for bridging in complex terrain negotiation. The fourth day will get into the process of climbing with the system, setting up fixed lines and the always interesting discussion of self-rescue. The work week finishes off, depending on venue, with a multi-pitch climb. And all this done on the TRACE Systems 6mm rope.

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High Angle Solutions is a weekly feature by DMM, CTOMS, and Atlas Devices.

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