ADS is here to support your EOY Purchases.

Posts Tagged ‘Trident Concepts’

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, November 12th, 2016

Intermediate Positions

Recently I had the privilege of attending my good friend Pat Roger’s memorial weekend hosted by the Alliance PD to provide some blocks of instruction on the rifle and one of my favorite rifle drills.

Priorities

While getting setup for the rifle drill we spent time reviewing positions and specifically the kneeling position. I love a good kneeling position, but I am surprised by how little work most people put into the positions. First, this is how we look at any of the positions for use on a battlefield, they are designed to help take advantage of available cover. Kneeling is a great intermediate position, high enough to shoot over some taller oddities and low enough to get under some. The mistake people make is thinking a kneeling position is there to increase your accuracy. It is not, it is there to take advantage of cover first and if possible improve your shooting your position second.

Stable shooting platform

Since we focus more on the cover aspect we have to rely on good technique to improve our marksmanship. There are so many different forms of kneeling out there, but don’t get hung up on whether it is a double knee, high knee, speed knee or some other crazy kneeling position. The body is still broken down into two parts, the upper and lower units. So many focus only on the lower unit, how they are kneeling and forget to work their upper unit. Truthfully, it doesn’t matter what type of kneeling position you use as long as you can take advantage of the cover you are trying to use and are stable enough to get your hits on target.

Pulling power

The key to the kneeling position has to do with your upper torso. Most folks just “hold” the weapon in their shoulder pocket. You need to pull the weapon into your pocket and not with just your arms. You need to engage the muscular chain of the upper back region. All those large and intimidating muscles that have tremendous pulling power compared to your wimpy arms. Let’s face it, if all you have to work the rifle is your arms you are missing out, now image recruiting the larger muscle groups to see the range of your effectiveness.

Muscle recruitment

Through years of frolicking about we discovered the benefits of muscle recruitment as it relates to shooting, it is hard to find a better example than kneeling. While you might be able to assume a stable lower unit on the flat range, the battlefield is less forgiving. As long as you are balanced and won’t fall over, you need to concentrate on retractor your shoulder blades, almost pinching them as if you are holding an object between them. That is were you see the stability you need to make hits at the extended ranges. While most folks don’t play with the kneeing at extended ranges you may not have a say in your gunfight. If you have to hit a target at 75, 100 even 200 yards while taking advantage of cover you may have to rely on technique alone.

You can opt to employ other techniques such as resting on objects, sling use or even aftermarket devices to help with recoil, but those are not a replacement for skill. I have seen folks engage targets well outside the normal range, they did so because they took what God gave them and exploited it on the battlefield.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Bravo Company USA. Bravo Company is home of the Gunfighters, and each week they bring us a different trainer to offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, June 18th, 2016

Bringing nothing to a gunfight

How much thought have you given to carrying personal protection tools other than a firearm? With the rampant increase in “gun free” zones are you still able to effectively and quickly protect yourself and loved ones.

Be prepared

Often times we get wrapped around the axle whether we can or cannot carry a gun. The subject of gun free zones is not relevant to this article, at some point we will all be in what I prefer to reference as “victim rich zones” or VRZ. The real question is what do you have available and have you trained for this contingency. I think it is foolish avoiding this subject, it is inevitable not to mention the consequences for breaking the law can be far more severe. While I recognize it is a personal choice, make sure you have weighed the options as well as consequences.

Think outside the box

In our Concealed Carry classes we talk about a threat matrix. This matrix is a breakdown of your perceived threat level as well as various loadouts. I ask all students to think long and hard into how you would effectively manage each of the blocks reminding them some blocks may not have any weapons at all. This exercise is incredibly helpful at addressing what to do when you must navigate a VRZ. The difficult part of many is recognizing the firearm free blocks. It sometimes is helpful to provide scenarios to this firearm free blocks such as going to the pool, boarding an airplane or visiting your children’s school. Even if you are permitted to carry in these locations now, recognize at some point you might not and better to acknowledge that notion now rather than later.

Create time and space

I find a firearm in the right hands to be incredibly effective at dealing with lethal threats. That should come as no surprise, but why is it effective? A major reason is it has the capability to launch multiple ballistic projectiles at varying distances. The key word is distances, in some cases you may not have access to your firearm even if it was permissible to carry so developing a layered defensive approach is sound. This approach can be scaled up or if necessary scaled down, but there is two more thoughts to consider here; metallic versus nonmetallic is one and whether you are subject to a physical search the other.

Plastic fantastic

Part of your threat matrix should include both metallic and nonmetallic weapons. If you cannot carry a firearm then you scale down to your next best options such as edged weapons, impact weapons, maybe chemical deterrents, stun guns and tasers should be considered. If you must navigate these VRZ’s frequently then suitable replacements must be explored and practiced with the same frequency as your firearms training. If you have to navigate these locations infrequently then scaling down is the better idea. On the nonmetallic side you may want to consider high impact plastic replacements for your normal array of edged and impact weapons. While these may lack some effectiveness as their metallic kin they will more than likely be adequate when you need them and can easily be replaced.

The black ops feel

If you must subject yourself to a physical search then stop and ask yourself is it really worth it for the simple reason your options are severely limited. However, there are still plenty to consider along with their covert method of carry and deployment. To me this is one of the most overlooked subjects within the concealed carry field. Carrying with no residual presence of any weapons. These types of options are available, but at a cost. Aside from the potential legal consequences the deeper the concealment the more difficult it will be to access; which puts even more emphasis on training.

Clothing attire, weapon selection and immediate actions to buy you time and distance to deploy your deep concealment options are becoming more and more relevant in our urban setting. This is were the art form of concealing really gets interesting.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, March 5th, 2016

By now most of us are probably sick of hearing or seeing posts about the recent negligent discharge. Surprised or not, safety is the top priority in any high risk training evolution.

It’s high risk for a reason

I don’t feel the need to regurgitate the incident, suffice it to say it was pretty stupid and I’m glad no one was hurt. The other day I was catching up with my good friend Pat Rogers and we were discussing the subject of negligent discharges. It is a very real possibility in firearms training classes and as instructors we have an obligation to ensure the safest training environment possible. Incidents like the one mentioned above are preventable by avoiding stupid behavior. The hard part is when your instructor is exhibiting the stupid behavior…ugh. My sincere hope is folks can look at this incident and see it for what it is, reckless and unnecessary. Learn from it and move on, focus on proper behavior during high risk training.

Set expectations early and often

Let’s pretend we live in a world where stupid shit like this doesn’t happen, or at least too often. As an instructor I set the tone early on for the expectations I have for our students while in class. It is clear and consistent from class to class because it is part of our programming and I hope it becomes a part of theirs once they leave. I truly believe if you hold your students to a higher standard, they will work tirelessly to meet the standard. From there we evaluate all training to determine it’s level of risk as well as ways to mitigate those risks. Sometimes, it means eliminating the risk completely as the best course of action. Next, we try to use redundant safety features where possible to minimize the known risks and even mitigate unknown risks that may pop up at times.

Begin with the end in mind

Safety briefing should be conducted and questions asked to ensure everyone knows their responsibility and what to do if the worse case should happen along with appropriate medical gear readily available. This type of training has inherent risks so creating a pre-mishap plan will help to expedite things should they go sideways. When a safety violation is committed it is important to deal with it at that moment and as a class. I can promise you, there are probably more of the same safety violations being committed and you are just not seeing them. So, it benefits explaining and addressing the situation as a group. If the same safety violation is committed by multiple students you need to evaluate your methods and your delivery of expectations as they are probably being overlooked.

Model behavior

As a student the best thing you can do is pay attention, pay attention to the details. I will be brutally honest; you cannot multi-task. If the instructor is briefing, listen! Don’t be loading magazines, trying to replicate the movements or wondering what’s for dinner. Stay focused during those moments and if you are unsure of what is expected ask for clarification. The worse possible thing you can do is try to argue over safety. The fastest way to be shown the door is when you try to save face or deny any wrong doing so own up to it if you make a mistake. The last thing I would add is look out for one another, don’t let someone do something dumb on the range because they are not paying attention or had a brain fart. Each class has the opportunity for failures, but also successes because we are helping one another. These are but a few considerations regarding safety, but it seems with the current incidents we have had it might be a good time to review them.

Safety is free; pay attention, know what you are doing and ask questions when unclear.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, January 16th, 2016

Going fast and being accurate are not mutually exclusive. Everyone likes to think so, but they are independent skill sets.

Assumptions…

Marksmanship fundamentals are one of the most talked about subjects, but most misunderstood. Being a marksman means you hit what you are aiming at on command. The moment speed comes into the equation many folks have difficulty because their marksmanship fundamentals are lacking. We make certain assumptions in our Concealed Carry class, assumptions based on marksmanship prerequisites. We are not there to teach them as much as apply them under concealed conditions.

The reluctant truth

What I am discovering is fundamentals are lacking more than I might like to admit. Then I’m forced to acknowledge we either do something about it or allow countless rounds to go downrange reinforcing bad habits. I choose to do something about it so in a sense we have to “lift lite to lift heavy”. What I mean is simply focusing on fundamentals from both a knowledge and application point of view. You have to have the knowledge of sight management, trigger management and follow through. These are the known and non-negotiable concepts for marksmanship. We have started to cover the fundamentals in every class in an effort to break the cycle.

It’s all in the technique

I love lifting philosophies and the one I mentioned above is a great example. The way we interpret it is you may want to lift the heavy weight, but you probably should lighten the bar and focus on your technique so you can eventually lift heavier. So how do we lighten the bar when it comes to shooting. We slow down, but slowing down is not the best way to describe the process. Instead what you need to do is perform each of the movements and actions at a speed you can execute them flawlessly. The tough part is forcing folks to go slow enough so we borrow a drill from the lifting world called a “tempo” drill.

Precise micro tasks

Nothing fancy about this, each action of firing a shot has a prescribed time limit or tempo you are to perform it within. A good example is the drawstroke, we ask the students to take 4 seconds to come from the holster to the target. Not fire the shot, not even align their sights, but move the pistol from the holster to the target. In this time period we are looking to see how precise their movements are and rather than rush them into making mistakes we give them plenty of time to do it correctly. The beauty of this drill is it eliminates the ego, it is no longer about speed. It is about how precise you can execute this micro-task; which sets you up for the correct application of the next micro task; sight management and so on.

Knowledge base

I feel too much emphasis is placed on speed and I see many students who move faster than they are able to guarantee their hits. If you move so fast you miss your shot, it really doesn’t matter. The tempo drill is harder than it sounds because you now have the opportunity to “think” your way through all the tasks and thinking requires the knowledge part. Remembering all the little details when you have the time challenges your knowledge base for sure. It doesn’t matter how skilled you are or think you are, using a tempo to execute a micro task is about the precision of your movements.

Just like in the lifting world, many students are interested in their speed or how heavy they lift. They should be more interested in the precision of their movements, in this case marksmanship fundamentals.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, December 5th, 2015

I think it’s safe to say the majority of the American citizenry does not expect violence. This mentality has lead to a weakening of not just our societal norms, but our national security.

Why bother

I can sit here and pontificate on how screwed up our government is, how one sided our media is and how “sheepish” the masses are, but it really isn’t going to fix the problem we face. Sure, there have been a few converts who have moved away from the dark side, but the efforts are largely wasted. If you finally realize you need to take your personal safety more serious forgive me if I don’t jump for joy. I don’t want to be all doom & gloom here, I would rather be matter of fact. What would the majority of those who already know we are at war gain value from, what really matters to their survival?

Hierarchy of needs

I’m a big believer in biology. In my opinion it doesn’t take a rocket scientist to figure out why, it is the survival of our species. Why are men attracted to certain women and women attracted to certain men? Eliminate the touche-feelie crap and it boils down to procreation, the continuation of our species. Breaking it down even further, survival has a lot to do with mindset. In this day an age, the majority of grass eaters have forgotten or have no idea the importance of survival and how to ensure their own, much less their family’s. It is really quite sad, but in the end your survival depends on your mindset, skill set and the tools at your disposal.

Be prepared

Mentally preparing for unplanned violence requires only it’s acknowledgment to get the proverbial ball rolling. If at a fundamental level you can acknowledge there is the possibility of unplanned violence it makes a huge difference mentally. Once you can look the animal in the eye, it frees you up to prepare. Preparation is key. A good friend of mine was on vacation over Thanksgiving holiday literally a few blocks from the Colorado shooting. In a brief discussion he commented how important preparation was and as the old Boy Scott motto goes, “be prepared” really epitomizes the situation. What have you done to prepare for that or other similar situations. Mental preparation motivates you to then physical prepare in the form of training.

How sharp is your blade

This is where the rubber really meets the road. All your mental preparation will be for not, if you don’t have the physical training to back it up. Unless your control of the Force is Jedi level you will have to fend like the rest of us. In this day an age with the escalation of terrorist threats the two most important training blocks you can obtain are combat marksmanship and concealed carry. Your skill with a firearm must be at the highest level you can obtain, then one more above that. You will never rise to the occasion you will default to your level of training. One of the reasons our standards are so tough is because nothing I do can honestly mimic the stress of real combat. If you have crappy technique based off a crappy program with crappy standards don’t be surprised by your crappy performance. Once your marksmanship skills are honed to a razor’s edge next comes having a firearm on you as often as possible; daily concealed carry. The art of concealing has evolved from the photographers vest of lure so get with the program and spend time perfecting your concealment game. When violence knocks on your door, will you answer with good intentions or hot lead. Once you get this part of the game down it will motivate you to then selecting your gear.

Water, water everywhere

Selecting your gear will be much easier once you have defined your mission. Until then, you are easily swayed by marketing and propaganda rather than truly fulfilling your needs. You also have probably asked yourself if you are fully prepared, could you use this or that or whatever new shiny object is that hits the market. At some point you have to recognize it is a come as you are war. Whatever you brought is all you got so choose wisely. It will either end the fight, allow you to strong point or allow you to move to a safe area or exit. The situation will always dictate. In other words, do you have enough ammunition to put the threat down fast. If not, will you have enough ammunition to keep them at bay while you strong point. If not, will you have enough ammunition to effectively maneuver to cover or an exit. All of the above it is implied your combat marksmanship skills are legit. So, yes, it is a good idea to create your jump bag, go bag or E&E bag whatever you want to call it, but realize you will probably not have it when it counts. You will have to win the fight, to survive, with your daily load out.

In the end, the world is not complicated. It is filled with evil, evil that must be confronted by righteous strength and courage. In the end, some people just need to be killed.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, October 31st, 2015

There is a lot of talk about having the brightest light possible these days. For the most part, I find it comical and here is why.

Do you even carry a light bro…

Let’s be clear we are talking about self defense scenarios, scenarios where your personal safety is at risk. Due to this risk you may have to employ lethal force from your firearm. To further define this, you will more than likely be carrying concealed. Seems reasonable, so why do I find it comical? We have conducted a dozen of our Concealed Carry Tactics classes this year alone. So much information has been discovered in the process. For instance, the average student does not carry a flashlight. Oh, they might have a flashlight, but they do not carry one with them every day. A very small percentage of students will employ a dedicated weapon mounted light for concealed carry. If they do have a weapon mounted light they have opted not to carry a handheld flashlight.

Que the crazy

Granted, this is a small sampling, but damn it is still very telling. One of the most versatile tools you can carry on a daily basis is a rugged, compact and powerful light. This is the criterion we use to select our lights and we recommend folks follow as well. The real question is how powerful? Que the crazy… I am not going to get wrapped up in the crazy, there is plenty to go around on this, but what I will say is there IS a point of diminishing returns. I don’t care what some folks think, at some point the juice is not worth the squeeze. In this case, the juice is the ability to carry the light consistently; like every damn day.

Look, it’s covered…

I would prefer someone who is carrying concealed have a good light over a spare magazine if forced to choose. I find it far more likely you will use the light versus the spare magazine. The crux of the issue is your ability to conceal your full load out versus just “covering” it all. Too many folks live in a fantasy camp or downplay the importance because they cannot conceal properly. Some will go so far as to dismiss the importance of concealing properly with a hint of bravado. If you are going to carry concealed, the operative word being “concealed”, then do it better…case closed.

The wheels come off fast

Then there is the argument for having a light with ridiculous light output because they need to penetrate six rooms deep as they conduct assaults on some structure. The funny part is many of these folks are the same folks who will fall back to statistics to support their inability to demonstrate true marksmanship. Hitting their target on demand from the extended ranges. They practice almost exclusively at the extreme close ranges creating a house of cards. The irony is so thick you could cut it with your knife you probably do a poor job of concealing as well.

Could of, would of, should of

If you do subscribe to statistics and find yourself at close range, the likelihood of having the time to deploy an uber bright light is a pipe dream. A prime factor for most criminal acts is proximity. The suspect has to be close enough to do harm, threaten to do harm or force you to do something unsafe. Even in the blackest of nights, your ability to observe the gun or knife shoved in your face is probably better than you think. But still some believe it is better to have all those lumens in case they need it to identify a far threat. I’m good with that, maybe you do. Here is another issue few recognize; your ability to accurate identify friend from foe. So, while your light may be ridiculously bright can you actually see the threat and when I say see, I mean be able to articulate in a court under oath you positively identified your threat before you employed lethal force.

Carry a light, carry it all the time and conceal it better.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.

Trident Concepts – The Blue Pill

Friday, October 16th, 2015

The title is a reference to the scene in The Matrix where the main character is awoken to reality. I like to use this reference when someone I know “wakes” up to our reality as it relates to Islamic terrorism.

POLITICALLY INCORRECT

The world has become so politically correct these days we are afraid to ask questions or speak the truth. We are afraid of being labeled, labels such as racist and Islamophobic. The truth is the answer to many of our problems, we need to seek the truth whenever possible then share what we have learned so others can see the same thing. There is no right or wrong to the truth, however the way we choose to look at it can have a right or wrong viewpoint. Recently I had an intense conversation with a close friend, someone I have known for years. They have not shared my views prior, but it was like a damn had burst.

FIRST PERSON ACCOUNT

I have been lucky to have seen the truth behind many of these terrorist organizations overseas. The oppression, cruelty and fear is real, ask any of us who have been overseas to share their experiences. I can vividly recall being asked to speak at a formal engagement about my experiences in Afghanistan. I was leery at first, but believed it was important the world know our efforts at the time were hugely successful. I didn’t know what to really talk about so I discussed what I saw and in particular the women. From the first to the last deployment I made I saw incremental changes to how women acted. There was fear in the beginning, fear we would abandon them, then as we had more success on the battlefield they slowly moved to more freedoms. These freedoms were concrete and started with their attire. In the beginning it was full on Burkas, then walking alone, then head pieces only, then I can recall seeing a women dressed in western business clothes walking freely in Kabul’s business district. Before our arrival this would have NEVER happened, but it was a testament to our success.

THE AWAKENING

Back to our friend, when they “awoke” and realized the clear and present danger Islamic terrorism present to our way of life it was very scary. It’s like being in a coma all your life and when you wake up everything is different. I tried to ask them to pinpoint the singular event that was the genesis to their awakening. They had to think about this since they had spent a huge amount of time researching and discovering the truth. When they got back to me, this article, “Why Islam is More Dangerous than other Religions” stuck out as being a pivotal point. I encourage folks to read the article, this information and thousands of others like it are out there. It has nothing to do with political correctness, political correctness is an insidious ally to the fundamental deconstruction of our way of life and I refuse to be PC. You don’t have to like what you learn, but you must acknowledge it as truth.

TRUTH

After reading the article and discussing it with them I suggested they read a few books that gave amazingly clear view of the dangers we face. The first was a New York Times best seller and entitled The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam. This was a great read and one of the best statements made on the book came from Andrew G. Bostom of the American Thinker,

“Robert Spencer’s The Politically Incorrect Guide to Islam (and the Crusades) is a very readable, highly informed critique of living Islamic institutions and historical practices incompatible with modern constructs of human rights, and peaceful international relations. One hopes his trenchant observations will motivate the public to cajole media and policymaking elites into initiating a candid discussion of Islam—a discussion these elites have thus far scrupulously avoided.”

Another book I found very interesting and got to listen to her speak was from Bridgett Gabriel entitled Because they Hate, a first person account of growing up in Lebanon and having to witness the atrocities of that time period. Much of which are not known to the public. Her views are brutally honest and difficult to dismiss. I strongly encourage folks to read both these titles and research on your own if you have doubts as to the dangerous position we are in as a country. Our way of life is currently under attack, there is no other way to put it and if we do not take action now it may have dire consequences for generations to come.

We cannot be afraid to seek the truth, to speak the truth and take action to protect our way of life. We are at war, whether you want to acknowledge it or not.

I am politically incorrect, that’s true. Political correctness to me is just intellectual terrorism. I find that really scary, and I won’t be intimidated into changing my mind. Everyone isn’t going to love you all the time. Mel Gibson, Actor

This OpEd was written by my friend Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts and shared at his request.

Gunfighter Moment – Jeff Gonzales

Saturday, September 26th, 2015

During our classes we ask students how do you train to run fast? At times we get some interesting responses, but the one we are looking for is “run fast”.

The ultimate balance

The balance of speed and accuracy should be everyone’s ultimate shooting goal. The mistake we see most often is when a student wants to put speed over accuracy in the early stages of their development. The basics form your foundation and that foundation will need to be rock solid because at some point you will need to hit the gas. A slow accurate shot is no better than a fast miss. I’m sure we have all heard the expression of not knowing your limits until you push yourself. I couldn’t agree more with that statement, but it is a tad bit more complicated.

Hitting the track

When we talk about pushing the limits a race track is the usual analogy. You hit the straightaways with your hair on fire, but have to negotiate the turns and this is where we find our limits. However, the mistake folks make is thinking they are a race car in the first place. A race car is built from the ground up to handle those high velocities with pinpoint steering. However, the average student is riding a mini-van with little family decals on the back (not that that’s a bad thing). While I can drive it on the race track, it is really not going to go fast and it will definitely not handle those curves well.

The failed road test

That is where the foundation comes into the equation, you have to build it from the ground up. I can get that minivan over 180mph, I just throw it out the back of a cargo plane. Obviously the sudden stop isn’t the best for return trips. Taking the time to ramp up is critical, it is also the most frustrating. There is so much that you have to think about, while it looks easy, shooting is a complex task. Once you have taken the time, put the work in to build up your vehicle you have to take it out on the track and push the limits. You will never know if the new tires or the engine are going to perform to your expectations until you push the limits.

Hit the gas big time

At a certain point in the class, usually once we have covered the fundamentals well enough and students have demonstrated satisfactory performance the next step is to get them to shoot fast. I literally tell them I want you to shoot as fast as you can guarantee the hit. That means every time you are engaging the target you are doing so as fast as your vehicle can handle the curves. Having standards are the only way of knowing if you are pushing your limits, without them you are guessing. Standards for both speed and accuracy. When I see a student fail, it is not because he wasn’t fast enough, it was because he wasn’t accurate enough to meet the standard.

Speed is important, but not at the sacrifice of accuracy, but being accurate needs to be fast enough.

– Jeff Gonzales
Trident Concepts, LLC

Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn, they offer some words of wisdom.