Quantico Tactical

Phokus Research Group Standard IFAK Vs. Sons Trauma Kit

This video by Phokus Research Group demonstrates the difference in accessibility between a standard IFAK vs. the Sons Trauma Kit.

phokusresearch.com/

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27 Responses to “Phokus Research Group Standard IFAK Vs. Sons Trauma Kit”

  1. You've got to be kidding me says:

    I just love how difficult he makes it look trying to get his supplies out of the pouch, as he fumbles and drops stuff everywhere. Nice infomercial technique….shocked he didn’t throw out his back too.

    What goes in the back plate area, a litter?

  2. Adam says:

    What keeps your plate from falling out when you access the SONS IFAK? Unless your specific PC has plate retention other than the hook & loop closure flap; nothing. Bye, bye plate.

    • SSD says:

      I’m kind of curious. Do you often dip into your IFAK for shits and giggles? Because generally, you are using a casualty’s IFAK on him, after he has been injured. And generally, he is prostrate. That means lying down. So gravity isn’t going to grab ahold of the casualty’s plate and rip it from his vest.

    • Buckaroomedic says:

      They’ve addressed this. The kit comes with some self-adhesive velcro that one places on their trauma plate and on the inside of the plate carrier. Simple and elegant solution.

  3. ninjaben says:

    I just don’t like the added thickness. We are always trying to fine thinner plate / soft armor options. We pay thousands to reduce the thickness of the plates only to move our med supplies there.

    Two other issues. The first would be increase to training costs. We can pack an IFAK with soon to expire supplies and replace the ones that get ruined with mulage cheaper than we can buy a vacuumed sealed kit. The second would be tailored med kits. What goes in your IFAK is usually dictated by team SOP. Some Medics may want you caring different occlusive, or an extra needle of needle D.

    I like the vacuum sealed concept, but not the placement or lack of customization.

    On the other hand their Hoplite, is a creative build on the drilling of old scope caps, that is more cost inhibitive than some of the other pin hole aperture concepts that are available during these fiscally conservative times.

    • SSD says:

      So basically what you’re saying is, you don’t like them

    • Buckaroomedic says:

      Phokus states on their web site that “contents can be customized for a units specific needs.” Remember; this is an IFAK, not an aid bag. Only so much med gear can be put into an IFAK.

      IMHO, the location is the best place possible. The equipment that will save a life is located is the most protected spot on the warrior. Brilliant.

  4. DaveWs says:

    Was waiting for the…”HAS THIS HAPPENED TO YOU,” “TIRED OF DROPPING YOUR GAUZE IN A DRAINAGE DITCH”….In all honesty I like the idea but I still think a tear-off is a much better option.

    • SSD says:

      The whole idea was that traditional IFAK pouches take up real estate. These reconfigure the kit and place it in a different position. 6 of 1, half dozen of another. It suits you or it doesn’t.

  5. Dave says:

    Haven’t used these, but it’s a nice concept, especially for LowVis work. I believe these were created because some folks died because their traditional IFAKs were destroyed in the IED blasts that wounded them. In an effort to prevent that from happening, the Sons Trauma Kit was developed. Bear in mind that, as with any piece of gear, mindful practice is the key to success. Another tool for your tool kit, especially as things wind down in the types of theaters most of us are used to.

  6. randomjoe says:

    Over engineering at its best, concept is great however at 135 dollars it is NOT worth the money…

    • Buckaroomedic says:

      Have you actually priced an IFAK with this level of equipment? It’s really not too bad. Plus this is the “retail” price. MIL/GOV and bulk discounts will bring the cost down significantly.

  7. Bill says:

    I like the idea of the product. is it right for everyone every time? No, nothing is. My issued IFAK has all the items in one corded holder that can pull everything out at once, not in pieces like the video, and it would be pulled from a well attached or “Thoroughly wove” molle pouch. It doesn’t look like the product adds too much depth to the plate, but that isn’t what concerns me. As a CLS, if I happen upon my buddy, and he is face down, or has suffered major torso trauma, I would be hesitant to move him, even to access his IFAK. Most casualties fall flat, not on their sides, but it can be a toss up to front or back. An IFAK on their side, corded and all together, as per an SOP, would be just as effective as this product. Remember, as stated in some above comments, you usually aren’t the one pulling your own IFAK. Plus not resealing the plate pouch would, to me at least, seem like more of a liability in combat and/or extraction. The only positive I see is the freeing up of molle real estate for more combat critical equipment.

    • Buckaroomedic says:

      I concur, the current Army issued IFAK is probably one of the best things to come out of the past 13 years of conflict. That and the new generation of tourniquets.

      Sometimes you gotta move a casualty to save them, especially if their still on the “X’. Moved and living is better than stayed and dead.

      With some training, it would be very easy to access these IFAKs. Even with the casualty in the prone, there is enough “negative” space to reach in there and extract the kit.

      See my velcro comment above about the plates falling out when moving.

  8. Bill says:

    I like the idea of the product. is it right for everyone every time? No, nothing is. My issued IFAK has all the items in one corded holder that can pull everything out at once, not in pieces like the video, and it would be pulled from a well attached or “Thoroughly wove” molle pouch. It doesn’t look like the product adds too much depth to the plate, but that isn’t what concerns me. As a CLS, if I happen upon my buddy, and he is face down, or has suffered major torso trauma, I would be hesitant to move him, even to access his IFAK. Most casualties fall flat, not on their sides, but it can be a toss up to front or back. An IFAK on their side, corded and all together, as per an SOP, would be just as effective as this product. Remember, as stated in some above comments, you usually aren’t the one pulling your own IFAK. Plus not resealing the plate pouch would, to me at least, seem like more of a liability in combat and/or extraction. The only positive I see is the freeing up of molle real estate for more combat critical equipment.

  9. JP says:

    Nice kit. However, no IFAK I’ve ever had, issues or purchased, has deployed like that, and I’ve never had to fumble for anything I needed to treat boo-boos. Lame demo.

    And the FUCKING FLAG IS WRONG. Again, super-duper-high-speed makers of kit for the troops, have no goddamn idea where a reverse flag patch is supposed to go. I know – totally not the point. But I’m so fucking sick of it.

    • jbgleason says:

      Legit gripe IMO.

    • Buckaroomedic says:

      Concur with the flag rant. Please display it properly!

      I also found the demo a little amusing. If I had found one of my troops with an IFAK in that condition, I would have . . . well let’s just say it wouldn’t have been nice.

      I hope you’re not putting your “first aid” item in your IFAK? Two separate kits; one for “life and limb” injuries and another (usually carried in your third line gear) for “boo-boos”. Don’t clutter your IFAK with bandaids and moleskin . . . yes I’ve seen it.

      • JP says:

        Nah, I treat everything with tape, of which I keep a small roll. Who need adhesive bandages when there’s tape – medical or duct?

  10. Glen says:

    You put the IFAK contents in a plastic bag in the pouch to protect it, roll it down to close it, do not seal it with tape etc! To deploy open pouch, pull out plastic bag using rolled down portion as a handle. You will then have all the contents on the deck in / out the plastic bag ready to go!

    From a foreigner looking in it’s like the old NASA spent $7 million developing a pen that would blah, blah,……….the Russians used a pencil! Sometimes folks really lose the plot with this gearcentric focus on solving mostly “perceived” not “real” problems.

  11. Buckaroomedic says:

    Gotta say there’s a lot of haters here today. From a medic’s standpoint I love this concept. It truly centralizes the IFAK and keeps it in the exact same location on every troop. Plus it’s in the most protected spot on the warrior’s body.

    I don’t know about you, but we always had two pieces of gear. One for training and the other for war. This is definitely in the “war” category of gear. It would be very easy to make some training versions of these for FTXs and ARTEPs. Kind of like what Glen said; make your own training version with large zip-lock bags.

  12. Attack7 says:

    You can’t please everyone! As a retired guy I love the concept along with Buckaroomedic (I was not a medic, but two duty positions I held had a medic(s) with me at all times). Shame on that video, he wasn’t…..you know the deal, that’s the first casualty I’ve seen standing up, casually pulling out his kit after being shot in restricted terrain on Route Trans-am near the woodcutters camp, East Paktika!!! IFAK has it’s problems as well. Price, you should never pay retail if you have a CAC. Find the right distributor/dealer/vendor who will honor your service!