FN Evolys Machine Gune

Posts Tagged ‘Alias Training & Security Services’

Mike Pannone – New CTT-Solutions Class Policy

Tuesday, June 23rd, 2015

No student was injured in a CTT-Solutions class or any other Alias class. This is to ensure it stays that way.

There have been several incidents where students in handgun classes carrying in a concealed appendix holster have discharged their pistol while re-holstering with subsequent injury. Therefore, I will be instituting a much stricter program of instruction and range policy designed to make every effort to ensure that all holsters in class are properly worn and safe for use both in and out of class. My evaluation will be based on body type, holster design/location and trigger design/weight. It will be in your best interest to have a belt slide holster and a cover garment suitable for use with it if you are planning to shoot from appendix in the event I deem your set-up unsuitable.
APPENDIX CARRY IS NOT FOR EVERYONE AND IS LIMITED TO CERTAIN BODY TYPES AND SKILL LEVELS. DO NOT ASSUME THAT JUST BECAUSE YOU BUY A GOOD QUALITY HOLSTER THAT YOU ARE FINE. THE HOLSTER MUST BE WORN PROPERLY AND IN THE PROPER LOCATION AND THE GUN MUST HAVE A TRIGGER THAT IS SUITABLE FOR CONCEALED CARRY.

The above mentioned problem is the result of one or more of the following factors:

  • Holster selection- certain body types cannot wear an appendix holster without their stomach forcing the gun into a position where it is pointed at their legs or genitals. When I carry appendix my pistol is not pointed at any part of my body unless I get in an awkward position.
  • Holster location- the holster genre is call “appendix” and if one looks on an anatomical chart, your appendix is not in the center of your body where your navel is. Improper wear causes it to be a safety concern by orienting the muzzle at the legs or genitals.
  • Trigger weight and design- a striker fired gun with a chambered round and an aftermarket lightened trigger is NOT suitable for concealed carry in an appendix holster with a round chambered in my classes. You can carry what you want on your time but NOT IN AN OPEN ENROLLMENT CLASS. I am quite confident in my skills and
  • 1.) I carry a DA/SA CZ P07 which gives me a much greater level of inherent safety.
    2.) When I did carry a striker fired gun the trigger was of stock weight with stock parts.

  • Technique and skill- when one is learning he/she should be going exceptionally slow so as to be able to identify EXACTLY the method by which they manage their gun and garment in conjunction with each other. With bad technique any firearm related task becomes risky and when learning new skills, speed can injure or worse.
  • Attention to detail- Don’t paw at a garment or gun to draw it or try and stuff it back in your holster like a sandwich into a bag. Think of the desired end state and never forget the nature of the device in your hands.
  • When re-holstering strictly adhere to the following steps:
    S-low down, straighten your trigger finger along the frame and well outside the trigger guard
    A-lways ensure the garment is completely cleared from the holster and surrounding area
    F-inal visual check that gun/holster are clear of clothing and finger is outside of trigger guard
    E-nd the action by slowly re-holstering the pistol

    *Other than a mechanical failure of the pistol, negligent discharges when drawing or re-holstering are always due to a mistake by the shooter. These mistakes are overwhelmingly caused by excessive speed and sloppiness. From this point on in every Covert Carry Class I will reserve final say on whether or not your holster is worn properly, in a suitable location and is appropriate for your body type and the pistol being used. It will be a requirement for all attendees to bring a belt holster along with their desired appendix holster. An inexpensive belt holster is worth the investment and should be integrated into any concealment training regardless of primary carry method.

    www.ctt-solutions.com

    Jeff Gonzales Joins Alias Training & Security Services

    Wednesday, December 10th, 2014

    Alias Training & Security Services has announced the addition of Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC to their instructor line-up. As a retired US Navy SEAL, Jeff brings years of experience with personal protection tactics and training to the Alias fold. Additionally, look forward to seeing Jeff’s experience and knowledge applied to our weekly ‘Gunfighter Moment’ segments in the coming weeks. The full release from Alias can be read below:

    image1

    Alias Training & Security Services is very proud to announce the addition of Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC to our line-up of world-class instructors. Jeff needs no introduction to the training industry. He has been one of the most respected and sought after instructors in the world for well over ten years. Jeff will bring this experience and Naval Special Warfare background to enhance our line-up for classes starting in 2015.

    Jeff Gonzales of Trident Concepts, LLC is a decorated and respected U.S. Navy SEAL who has worked in a variety of environments and capacities throughout the globe. He specializes in personal protection tactics and training for armed and unarmed conflicts. His motto is “Concepts that meet reality”. Jeff’s goal is not simply to train you, but to better prepare you for the worst-case scenario.

    Link to Jeff’s Training Class Schedule: aliastraining.com

    Alias Training & Security Services Announces Addition Of SGM Daryl Holland As An Instructor

    Tuesday, August 12th, 2014

    This is an announcement from Alias Training & Security Services regarding the recent addition of SGM Daryl Holland as an instructor under their fold.

    DSC_0909

    Alias Training & Security Services is proud to announce the addition of long time Special Operations Veteran & firearms instructor Daryl Holland to our family.

    Daryl Holland is a retired U.S. Army Sergeant Major with over 20 years of active duty experience, 17 of those years in Special Operations. He served five years with the 1st Special Forces Group (SFG) and 12 years in the 1st SFOD-Delta serving as an Assaulter, Sniper, Team Leader, and OTC Instructor.

    He has conducted several hundred combat missions in Afghanistan, Iraq, Bosnia, Philippines, and the Mexican Border. In particular, he is the veteran of combat missions in Afghanistan’s Hindu Kush Mountains as a Sniper and experienced Mountaineer and on the streets of Baghdad as an Assault Team Leader.

    He has a strong instructor background starting as an OTC instructor and since retirement training law abiding civilians, Law Enforcement, U.S. Military, and foreign U.S. allied Special Operations personnel from around the world.

    A link to Daryl Holland’s current class schedule can be found here: aliastraining.com

    Gunfighter Moment – Frank Proctor

    Saturday, January 25th, 2014

    Shooting in Kit

    What’s up shooters! I’m gonna talk a bit about my thoughts on shooting in kit and kit in general. There’s a key word in the title and it’s the shooting part! If you are wearing kit as part of your job and you carry a gun I think you should set up the kit to allow you to shoot the gun the best way possible and do everything you need to do in the line of duty. Too many times I think dudes bulk up their kit way more than they need to. I’m a bit of a minimalist so I like less to give me more. In this case, less kit equals more mobility and therefore more offensive capability.

    Here are some key areas for me on kit setup:

  • Have everything you truly need, but nothing you don’t
  • Firing side shoulder clear to mount the rifle
  • Firing side area clear to reach the pistol
  • Essential equipment (ammo, radio, tourniquet) reachable with both hands
  • Be able to go to a full squat without the plate choking you at the neck or waist
  • Be able to climb, buildings etc, without snag hazards on the front of your gear
  • I’ve recently been doing some of my YouTube videos in kit for 2 reasons. The first reason is just to demonstrate that kit doesn’t have to impede your ability to shoot and move well and for a fact it shouldn’t. If it does you should fix it I think. And that leads me to the second reason, Test your equipment and yourself. I recently got a new armor carrier so I’ve been testing it out and shooting in it to see how well it allows me to do what I need to do. So far it’s awesome. The kit is the MOAB from Rogue Gunfighter. It’s pretty cool, low profile and designed to fit many operational needs. It can go low profile or quickly add or take away more gear to it including a chest rig and back pack. Something I like about it is right out of the box is it’s ready to go. I can put everything I need in it with out having to weave one piece of MOLLE! The MOAB is super comfortable and handles weight well also. Another huge plus is I can shoot very comfortable in it with zero interference from the kit. In the week or so that I’ve had it I’ve shot some USPSA style stages in it, run CQB, did a one man break contact deal at my range 400 yards bounding back though my berms spaced about 50 yards apart and some other maneuverability exercises. It’s working great. I highly recommend everyone go out and run through some sort of stress event in new gear to validate the kit and the set up. If you identify a deficiency, it’s better to know up front and fix it.

    That’s all I’ve got for now for more info on the MOAB check out www.roguegunfighter.com.

    Also here’s a video of me yapping about it and shooting in it:

    And of course you can check out my website for more info on what I’m all about. Thanks y’all!
    www.wayofthegun.us

    -Frank Proctor

    20130823-210852.jpg

    Frank Proctor has served over 18 years in the military, the last 11 of those in US Army Special Forces. During his multiple combat tours in Afghanistan & Iraq he had the privilege to serve with and learn from many seasoned veteran Special Forces Operators so their combined years of knowledge and experience has helped him to become a better operator & instructor. While serving as an instructor at the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course he was drawn to competitive shooting. He has since earned the USPSA Grand Master ranking in the Limited Division and Master ranking in the IDPA Stock Service Pistol division. He learned a great deal from shooting in competition and this has helped him to become to become a better tactical shooter. Frank is one of the few individuals able to bring the experiences of U.S. Army Special Forces, Competitive Shooting, and veteran Instructor to every class.

    All this experience combines to make Frank Proctor a well-rounded shooter and instructor capable of helping you to achieve your goal of becoming a better shooter.

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Gunfighter Moment – Frank Proctor

    Saturday, December 14th, 2013

    Performance Shooting…in my opinion

    I started my training company in January 2012 and as I started it I struggled with what flavor of shooting I would focus on, tactical or competitive. I ended up at a blend and for a lack of a better term I simply call it Performance Shooting.

    I define Performance Shooting as: Applying the correct ratio of speed and accuracy to dynamic shooting situations with a goal of scoring maximum points in minimum time with 100% accountability. As I see it that definition applies to whatever we do with the guns if winning is a concern. If you are a competitive shooter you need to score more points in less time than the other shooters you are competing against. If you are a tactical shooter I think you absolutely need to score more “points” in less time than the other guy that’s shooting at you or someone else.

    That correct ratio of speed and accuracy is a key factor that will allow us to score more points in less time. Accuracy is awesome and it has been said that accuracy is final and I believe that for sure, but if it takes longer than it needs to, you will loose. Case in point, if shooter A can fire 5 accurate rounds from 25 yards will 100% accuracy at a rate of a shot every second and shooter B can deliver the same accuracy for 5 shots at a rate of a shot every half second, who wins? Speed is also awesome, however if we shoot fast and miss, we loose and for the tactical shooter…where did those bullets go?

    I push for the correct blend of speed and accuracy with a heavy dose of accountability and repeatability and the ability to deliver it under stress. I think a great place to test your shooting abilities under stress is to go out and shoot a match. Competitive shooting is the thing that drove me to become a better shooter and I have taken a lot of lessons away from it that have made me a better tactical shooter and operator. I encourage anyone that carries a gun in the line of duty or for self-defense to go out and compete. Do it with an open mind and use it as a tool to evaluate your shooting abilities under stress and your ability to process information quickly. You’ll find out what you need to work on (I certainly did and still do) and have a good time doing it with some like-minded people. Not a bad way to spend a Saturday morning!

    I’ll probably do another one of these articles focused on my take aways from competitive shooting and how those things crossed over and made me a better operator. Until then go out and shoot a match and see what YOU think, see if your shooting skills under stress are where you want them to be.

    -Frank Proctor

    20130823-210852.jpg

    Frank Proctor has served over 18 years in the military, the last 11 of those in US Army Special Forces. During his multiple combat tours in Afghanistan & Iraq he had the privilege to serve with and learn from many seasoned veteran Special Forces Operators so their combined years of knowledge and experience has helped him to become a better operator & instructor. While serving as an instructor at the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course he was drawn to competitive shooting. He has since earned the USPSA Grand Master ranking in the Limited Division and Master ranking in the IDPA Stock Service Pistol division. He learned a great deal from shooting in competition and this has helped him to become to become a better tactical shooter. Frank is one of the few individuals able to bring the experiences of U.S. Army Special Forces, Competitive Shooting, and veteran Instructor to every class.

    All this experience combines to make Frank Proctor a well-rounded shooter and instructor capable of helping you to achieve your goal of becoming a better shooter.

    Gunfighter Moment is a weekly feature brought to you by Alias Training & Security Services. Each week Alias brings us a different Trainer and in turn they offer some words of wisdom.

    Alias Training & Security Services – Defoor Proformance Shooting Flexfit Trucker Hat

    Thursday, December 12th, 2013

    Defoor Proformance Hat

    It’s been called the greatest shooter & operator accessory in the history of modern firearms. Guaranteed to increase accuracy and make you faster at the same time, it’s first appearance on the scene 3 years ago resulted in increased pregnancies and a shortage of IPSC and NRA bulls nationwide. Made in mesh trucker hat style paying tribute to Kyle’s Alabama upbringing, the DPS logo in patriotic red, white and blue channeling the artistry of the 1950’s when putting your name on something meant everything. It’s sans Velcro, silly Latin sayings, and that damn hole in the back that sunburns the bald, but in a pinch can be used as a signal panel, brass bucket, currency in most countries or a shooting rest for a rifle. The bill can be worn West Coast or Southern Style. When you spot another in this hat it guarantees a like minded friend for life and we look forward to you sending in the pics and stories.

    V/R,

    Kyle Defoor

    “Trainer of Feeders”

    Kyle Defoor is a former Special Mission Unit combat decorated Navy SEAL and sniper who served in Afghanistan. Kyle teaches firearms and tactics to military and law enforcement personnel in the United States and worldwide. He also offers marksmanship related open enrollment classes to the public.

    www.kyledefoor.com

    You can get the hat here: aliastraining.com/defoorproformanceshootingflexfittruckerhat/

    Alias Training & Security Services – TMACS, Inc. ‘Gas It Up And Burn It Down’ T-Shirt

    Friday, December 6th, 2013

    Gas it up and burn it down

    Alias Training & Security Services is currently selling TMACS, Inc. t-shirts. The shirt is black and features Pat McNamara’s ‘Gas It Up and Burn It Down’ logo on the front, the TMACS logo on the back, an American flag on the right sleeve, and ‘Angry Angry Angry’ on the left sleeve, all in white print. Available in sizes Sm-XXL.

    aliastraining.com/patmcnamaratmacsincapparel

    McNamara_pistol

    Patrick McNamara spent twenty-two years in the United States Army in a myriad of special operations units. When he worked in the premier Special Missions Unit, he became an impeccable marksman, shooting with accurate, lethal results and tactical effectiveness. McNamara has trained tactical applications of shooting to people of all levels of marksmanship, from varsity level soldiers, and police officers who work the streets to civilians with little to no time behind the trigger.

    His military experience quickly taught him that there is more to tactical marksmanship than merely squeezing the trigger. Utilizing his years of experience, McNamara developed a training methodology that is safe, effective and combat relevant and encourages a continuous thought process. This methodology teaches how to maintain safety at all times and choose targets that force accountability, as well as provides courses covering several categories, including individual, collective, on line and standards.

    While serving as his Unit’s Marksmanship NCO, he developed his own marksmanship club with NRA, CMP, and USPSA affiliations. Mac ran monthly IPSC matches and ran semi annual military marksmanship championships to encourage marksmanship fundamentals and competitiveness throughout the Army.

    He retired from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting).
    tmacsinc.com

    aliastraining.com/

    Sentinel: Become the Agent in Charge of Your Own Protection Detail

    Friday, December 14th, 2012

    Pat McNamara retired after 22 years of Army service from the Army’s premier hostage rescue unit as a Sergeant Major and is also the author of T.A.P.S. (Tactical Application of Practical Shooting). He is a renowned tactical trainer, leading TMACS, Inc. His services are available through Alias Training & Security Services.

    20121213-163601.jpg

    Anything can happen to anyone, anywhere, at any time. Wouldn’t you rather know that you had done everything in your power to have prepared yourself for that moment when something goes wrong? None of us plan to fail, but we may fail to plan.

    In Sentinel, author Patrick McNamara provides an instructional guide filled with survival techniques for the family. Drawing from his background as a special-operations agent for twenty-two years, McNamara discusses the importance of being the protector of the family and provides a host of techniques, strategies, and procedures to ensure safety. He offers simple steps for being better prepared for power blackouts, home invasions, and attacks on the street and more. From your home to your vehicle and beyond, McNamara discusses how to plan for contingencies.

    Sentinel provides the information necessary to help you take charge of your own domain and be able to count on yourself to protect your own life and the lives of those close to you.

    Available in Kindle or Paperback editions from www.amazon.com