G-Code

Afghan Border Police Adopt Ghostex Pattern

HyperStealth Biotechnology Corporation has announced that the Afghanistan Border Police (ABP), an elite division of the Afghanistan National Police (ANP) with a strength of around 20,000 has authorized the Ghostex Kilo-1 pattern as their new uniform camouflage.

You may notice that the pattern looks complimentary to the Operation Enduring Freedom Camouflage Pattern (OCP) currently used in Afghanistan by the US Army and Air Force. This is because the US Government stipulated that the new ABP pattern must have similar coloration but yet be distinctively different. This is so that the forces could work in concert during operations but would not be mistaken for one another in close proximity. Based on this requirement, HyperStealth was able to offer three different patterns from the Ghostex line the same day the request came in.

A Purchase Order has been issued and the first 12,000 yards of fabric has been already been printed. The fabric is milled and printed in the US and then sent to Afghanistan for assembly by Afghanistan citizens working for Afghanistan companies.

This is not the first time HyperStealth has worked with the Afghanis. In 2009, the Afghanistan National Army (ANA) chose Hyperstealth’s Spec4ce Afghan Forest pattern for their uniforms.

Ghostex is a joint venture between ADS Inc and Canada-based HyperStealth Biotechnology Corporation.

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14 Responses to “Afghan Border Police Adopt Ghostex Pattern”

  1. Bob M says:

    “elite division of ANP”

    Boy, I laughed at that one. The ANP are corrupt but the border patrol takes it to a new level. Those yahoos are at the border to collect bribes and pass Iranian and Pakistani ordnance into the country. I didn’t meet a single border patrol unit that I felt safe around enough to not have a round loaded in the chamber.

  2. steve says:

    At least we will be more confused when they start shooting at us since they now have a derivative of multicam to wear.

  3. Grammarian says:

    The proper adjective used to describe people or things from Afghanistan is “Afghan” and not “Afghani.” This error is an unfortunate result of the two wars and the adjective “Iraqi” properly used to describe people or things from Iraq (Cf., “Iranian” and not “Irani”).

    Accuracy in all things.

  4. Buckaroomedic says:

    Great! Now when they start shooting at our troops it will be even harder to IFF. What a waste of money . . . BTW, who’s paying for this? I hazard a guess and say it’s probably “Uncle Sugar”. 10 years is long enough, it’s time to get the flock out of there.

  5. ThePesH says:

    Nice multicam variant … looks realy good

  6. Greg says:

    Just like when few people say somalian when its actualy somali accuracy usualy always takes the back door, and the ABP are such back wood retards.

  7. elleerre says:

    Nice camo.

    I was wondering how much they will pay this “unique” variant of multicam. It takes less than 2 minutes of a good skilled graphic operator to make that “swirled” version on the original pattern.

  8. kvålseth says:

    elleerre, as a good skilled graphic operator myself… it’s a bit more complicated than that to produce a camouflage pattern like this.

  9. elleerre says:

    I’m not talking about “production”. I’m talking about “modification”. If you start from the original MC file, or a variant of it, and you have professional software, it’s quite easy. Sure it hasn’t to be redesigned. Maybe Crye gave it to Hyperstealth under other’s request, who knows. As skilled graphic, if you look the picture (especially the top left and low right corners) you can clearly see the “swirl” on the pattern.

    What does this mean? Absolutely nothing. I was only reasoning.

    😉

  10. Johnny B says:

    Now the question is: Do they get custom Ghostex Multicam (Ghosticam? MultiGhost?) gear and boots, or does that come in the vanilla Crye variety? Or will they do my favorite thing – adopt a really effective camo pattern and promptly cover it in rectangular and other easily identifiable geometric shaped pieces of single-colored straps and packs?

  11. Guy Cramer says:

    The Kilo-1 pattern is not based on OCP but finds its origins in a 2nd Generation digital pattern Hyperstealth developed in 2004, that pattern has been objectively tested by the USMA and showed up publicly for the first time in a photo on a weapon in 2010 within this U.S. Army article on camouflage http://www.army.mil/article/40245/West_Point_explores_science_of_camouflage/ . In 2007 we used this same pattern as a base which was then further enhanced with a new algorithm which modified the squares and rectangles in such a way that they flare into a very detailed disruptive pattern, this new variation became the (3rd Generation) 5 color India-O8 pattern http://www.hyperstealth.com/india/index.html . For the Kilo-1 (4th generation) variation, we then compressed the India-O8 pattern added one extra color and added one more fractal algorithm to increase the disruption across the human shape with both a Macro and Micro elements to fool both the Ambient and Focal region of the eye and we ended up with one of the most aesthetic patterns to come from Hyperstealth.

  12. straps says:

    I would say that elleerre and kvÃ¥lseth are both right WRT the ease or difficulty of filtering Multicam into Ghostex. Not quite as simple as running a splatter filter on a raster file, but it’s obvious that they used the MC pallete (and gradient rules). I suspect they started with a similar (or identical) set of vector shapes which they then twisted, spherized and probably splattered.

    But yeah, effective camo for the ABP will serve only to make it harder for the people bribing them to make their drops.

  13. Johnny B says:

    For the Kilo-1 (4th generation) variation, we then compressed the India-O8 pattern added one extra color and added one more fractal algorithm to increase the disruption across the human shape with both a Macro and Micro elements to fool both the Ambient and Focal region of the eye and we ended up with one of the most aesthetic patterns to come from Hyperstealth.

    …… and looks a hell of a lot like Multicam.

  14. […] we mentioned that the Ghostex Kilo-1 pattern had been adopted for use by the Afghanistan Border Police. As you can see, it uses a similar color palette but the geometry is […]