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Archive for the ‘Ammo’ Category

PolyCase Ammunition Names CMG Marketing & Events and Murray Road Agencies of Record

Thursday, August 10th, 2017

PolyCase® Ammunition has announced that CMG Marketing & Events and The Murray Road Agency will become their Agencies of Record effective immediately. CMG will be responsible for public relations, media buying and event planning and Murray Road will cover creative services and social media.

PolyCase has been adopted as an excellent alternative to traditional ammunition in the self-defense, hunting, law enforcement and military markets. Terminal effects, accuracy and reliable performance from these lighter, faster polymer projectiles are revolutionarily different from traditional ammunition. The Inceptor® and Ruger® brands of ammunition are growing in popularity and the new team will focus on continuing the momentum and increasing exposure with customers and consumers alike.

“CMG’s expertise in media planning, public relations and event planning stands out from the crowd,” said Ric Brown, Sr. Vice President of Operations of PolyCase. “We have an ever-broadening product line and a diverse customer base that requires targeted and strategic engagement. The Murray Road Agency has a unique understanding of our industry and what it takes to move the needle. The ability of these two established agencies to manage our marketing efforts will be a major factor in our success.”

As part of the overall program, CMG will handle all elements of media buying and planning, including day-to-day contact with media outlets and their sales representatives. In addition, CMG will be responsible for all public relations and editorial product requests and will be the point of contact for all media inquiries to PolyCase. CMG will also oversee trade show and event planning needs.

The Murray Road Agency will assume responsibilities for all creative and marketing services as well as social media planning and execution.

“We are excited to be partnering with the PolyCase Ammunition team,” said CMG President Cathy Williams. “We will ensure the PolyCase brand is present in the most prominent publications and digital platforms. We are also here to help our influential endemic media obtain products, information and assets for their editorial needs. We look forward to helping the brands and company continue to grow.”

FightLite Reveals Next Generation (Squad Automatic) MCR and Lightweight Polymer Ammo

Friday, July 21st, 2017

FightLite® Industries, a division of ARES Defense Systems® Inc. located in Melbourne, Florida announces a development program for next generation, lightweight polymer ammunition to work in conjunction with its patented Dual-Feed™ Squad Automatic MCR® (Mission Configurable Rifle).

In a radical departure from the directions of both case telescoped ammunition and conventional polymer ammunition, FightLite® is pursuing an innovative development strategy for a 5th generation hybrid cartridge that is projected to lighten ammunition weight by up to 30% and deliver reduced ammunition cost, while also supporting legacy infantry weapons and machine guns.

There are millions of 5.56mm and 7.62mm NATO weapons in both the US military and around the globe where users stand to benefit from a significant reduction in ammunition weight without sacrificing performance or reliability. FightLite® Industries and its parent organization ARES Defense have been very successful with their outside-the-box approach to problem solving in the small arms business during the past 20 years.

The company’s flagship weapon is its 8.5 lb. select-fire Squad Automatic MCR® that shares the excellent ergonomics of the M4A1 and feeds reliably from both M27-linked ammunition belts and standard M16 magazines at operator discretion. Featuring reliable gas-piston operation and a tool-less quick-change barrel system; the patented MCR® is the lightest and most portable belt fed machine gun in the world. Suppressor and grenade launcher capable, its select-fire operation allows soldiers and contractors to quickly and accurately engage both point and area targets. And when coupled with FightLite’s finalized 5th Gen lightweight cartridge, the MCR® and FightLite® ammo combination will represent the lightest 5.56mm automatic rifle with full combat load available anywhere.

The select-fire FightLite® MCR® is derived from the ARES-16 AMG-2™ (Assault Machine Gun) that was selected for testing by the US Army’s Soldier Enhancement Program (SEP) and includes product enhancements that were made to the AMG-2™ following experience with M855A1 EPR ammunition and earlier military testing done during the Army’s AEWE Spiral H experiment at Fort Benning.

Such enhancements include further weapon weight reduction and simplification, a square shaped feed roller housing, a heat treated steel feed plate that reduces feed ramp wear from M855A1 steel tipped projectiles, refinements in the breech bolt lug profile, a reinforced charging handle assembly, the company’s highly effective RipBrake™ muzzle compensator, and a proprietary method of mitigating cookoff risk while maintaining a select-fire, closed bolt system of operation that is more accurate and user-friendly than standard open-bolt light machine guns.

Some additional key elements of the MCR® are that it shares a 52% part commonality with existing NSN components already in the government system and the core technology can retrofit to any MIL-Spec AR15, M16 or M4 type lower receiver; meaning that it is rearward compatible to the very first Colt Mod. 01 (M16) manufactured in 1960. These accomplishments reduce a military’s logistical footprint and costs including spare components and operator and armorer training. Additionally, the dual-feed MCR® permits squad automatic rifle users to operate during the assault with 100 and 200 round magazines of M27-linked ammunition, but also retains the ability to reliably feed from 4179 STANAG (M16/M4) magazines from other squad members should linked ammunition run low during combat.

“The Army and some of our commercial customers have been interested in lightweight ammunition for quite some time, so our R&D team is pretty excited about the progress we’re making to finally solve the elusive lightweight ammunition equation for conventional rifles and machine guns,” says Geoffrey Herring, CEO of ARES Defense Systems®. “We’re aware that various iterations of polymer cased ammunition have been introduced to the commercial market during the past several years, but we also know some of the setbacks they’ve experienced along the way such as ballistic underperformance, case melt, moisture absorption, case separation or deformation, and catastrophic failures when the heat or pressure is up. Most of the polymer ammunition manufacturers are employing first through third generation technology which can be predisposed to fail when subjected to rough handling, temperature extremes, environmental conditions, and the pressures necessary for full ballistic performance of modern rifle ammunition.”

Brass cased ammunition has been relied on for over 150 years and has presented many challenges for the arms industry to find an alternative material that accomplishes everything that a standard brass case does. In addition to providing a convenient capsule to house the bullet and components, keep the powder dry and reliably feed into the chamber, it is also a critical gas container that keeps the shooter safe from the 50,000-70,000 psi chamber pressure when the round is fired. When the malleable brass case expands against the chamber wall during obturation, it performs as a mechanical brake reducing bolt loading and embeds many impurities from the chamber such as grit, carbon or unburned propellant into the case body which is then extracted from the chamber in a semi self-cleaning arrangement. Since brass is an excellent thermal conductor, it also absorbs and removes with each shot a small amount of heat generated by the friction of the projectile traveling down the bore. It can be stored for extended periods of time and can tolerate temperature extremes such as freezing cold, rough handling, hazardous environmental conditions and water submersion. But some of the biggest strikes against it are weight and cost, and depending on the individual manufacturer the 12 to 20 step manufacturing process necessary to fabricate a single cartridge.

FightLite® isn’t sharing any proprietary details at this stage about the (5th Generation) construction methods being privately developed in house with IRAD until its patents for the hybrid technology are solidified. But the FightLite® R&D team is systematically addressing and overcoming the hurdles that have plagued early players in the lightweight ammunition space and is confident in its decision to pursue development of a lightweight cartridge that will also support legacy weapons in the US arsenal and NATO countries, and other users around the world.

“Our company’s approach to product development has always been to invest in inclusive technologies that benefit a greater consumer base as exemplified by our MCR® being rearward compatible from today’s production M4A1 to the very first M16’s that the Army ever purchased. To date, our company has produced and delivered thousands of dual-feed MCR® type upper receiver assemblies and rifles throughout the US and overseas, so we’re very comfortable with our product, its capabilities and the ability to produce it,” says Herring. “The primary objective for developing polymer ammunition is to additionally lighten the soldier’s ammunition load by at least 20% and we think that our hybrid case will be able to achieve that while maintaining safety and ballistic performance and also supporting legacy systems. We’ve already accomplished significant weight savings for the soldier with our squad automatic MCR® which currently weighs 50% less than the current M249 and is 3-times more accurate as verified by US military testers during live fire exercises. In fact, our gun was so effective at improving the squad’s speed and mobility during our participation in the Army’s AEWE Spiral H experiment that there is soldier support on record for adding two additional weapons to the current 9-man squad for a total of two of our guns per fire team.”

No firm date is being stated at this time for delivery of FightLite® 5.56mm hybrid ammunition to market. In the interim, FightLite® Industries and its parent organization ARES Defense Systems® will continue supplying its customers with its commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) Squad Automatic MCR® and AMG-2™ weapons which can currently use almost any of the billions of rounds of 5.56 NATO ammunition stockpiled throughout the world. Once the R&D cycle on FightLite® 5.56mm hybrid ammunition is completed, the company will likely either seek mass production of the ammunition through established high-volume ammunition producers or consider licensing its next generation squad automatic rifle (NGSAR) and ammunition technology to one of the USA’s larger prime defense contractors.

To learn more about FightLite® Industries visit www.FightLite.com. Follow FightLite® Industries on Facebook at facebook.com/FightLite , on Twitter @FightLite and on Instagram @FightLite.Industries.

“New Calibers, the Fight to Come” by Frank Plumb

Monday, July 10th, 2017


In my efforts to enhance the lethality of US weapon systems, my intent has always been to bring more people into the discussion. I do my best to not speak in absolutes, I intend to discuss things conceptually. This is so that experts in the finer points of cartridge construction, rifle barrel design, and ballistics could help drive the conversation. I am not some tier one super hero. I do not pretend to know everything and I would be highly skeptical of anyone who claims they do. But I have little fear in speaking out. I know this community has what it is needed to help drive the development of what could be the last cartridge based systems fielded by the U.S military.

There have been a few shifts in my thinking. The first was a firefight in 2003. Before then I was always under the notion that 5.56×45 mm projectiles would be modified to meet the demands of combat environments. When your perspective is based on ½ mass time velocity squared, 5.56×45 appears to the end all be all. But, I landed in Ft Bragg in November of 2003, with a new perspective.

I’ve mentioned the King and Queen of combat marksmanship. Energy Transferred into the target is the Queen and Shot Placement is the King. That these elements combine into the probability of killing the enemy. In the mid 2000’s a study was released that said 5.56 bullets need to yaw to transfer energy. If the 5.56 bullet does not Yaw or “tumble” shot placement becomes even more critical. It can kill without it, but the kill probability drops substantially. The Army study said a 5.56 bullet needs 4.75 inches of body penetration to Yaw. The people we have been shooting at for the last 16 years are not known for being more than 5 inches thick.

Until this study was released, I believed that the 77grain bullet and other larger 5.56 projectiles were going to be the answer in most applications. I then discussed with my father, a famous sniper in LE circles, the USMC’s experiences in the transition from the M14 to the M16. Stories of grown Marines on the verge of crying from frustration in shooting the M16 the first time are still visceral to him. Had we gotten it wrong all those years ago? Did we hamstring our forces for a half century in the name of lighter weight? Did we marry light, cheap, and easy at the expense of lethality and the military half mile? (I feel we should have ALL rifles capable of engaging targets to 800m not 500m as some have suggested)

Around this same time, I had a chance meeting with a staffer from Senator Tom Coburns office. One conversation led to an email. This email turned into hours of phone calls and a white paper. This white paper was sent to the Secretary of the Army and became the Individual Carbine program. At the time, I was a senior NCO assigned to a NG SF ODA. Not really the center of gravity in weapons modernization. But I kept in contact with Senator Coburn and his staff. I advocated for multiple weapons platforms that I thought would be effective solutions.

But what I tried to communicate more than anything else was the projectile. The bullet we were shooting was more important than the gun we were shooting it with. DoD was so tied to 5.56×45 that it there was no way any small arm wouldn’t use it. The Individual Carbine was cancelled a few years ago because none of the weapons offered any cost/performance benefit over the M4. It is the same reason the SCAR ® Mk.16 was cancelled. They all shoot the same 5.56×45 cartridge. Like I said the bullet we shoot is more important than the gun. No change in bullet equals no change in rifle, the M4 lived on.

Not long after this I went to the SCAR fielding at 1st Special Forces Group. While I liked the Mk.16, I completely forgot about it the second I shot the MK.17 SCAR®. It felt new, light, and a lot like the future. It was European so it had some quirks like ergonomics and not enough room for all the lights and lasers. But the aftermarket would resolve that. I started digging around in my network about the first field reports. I talked to friends at 2nd Ranger Bn. and 3rd SFG. I had faith this was going to be the system that was going put it all together. That the SCAR was a SOPMOD away from perfection. I figured the SCAR® was the answer. Now we can really knock people in the dirt. Simply put 7.62×51 is very lethal, and I could do house work with this gun.

But there is a problem. 7.62×51 does not have the legs to be effective past 1000m. For those that know there has been a long-standing need to have a +1000m battle rifle. I’ve known this for well over a decade. Until recently not many people listened. Some are now. One who agreed early was Jim Schatz.

I met Jim Schatz when he came to Seattle in 2012 for a small arms conference. I had a friend use his credentials to get me in. I remember it was in the convention center in Seattle, Washington. The same place I would meet Alan Handl just a few months later that same year.

I was advising the staff of Senator Coburn at the time on the Individual Carbine program. I had many questions and doubts about case less ammunition. How do you clear malfunctions? Can it fire out of a battery? What happens when it does? Jim told me about his experiences with an experimental case-less gun. Well if I had doubts before, they were concrete reasons now. It’s a conversation that makes me utterly scared of LSAT. While these solutions maybe the future, they have serious technical hurdles to overcome. Also, advancements in polymer cases will be probably too far advanced to make the effort cost effective.

I remember mentioning to Jim the bane of our existence, the PKM. That we had no proper counter. The Mk.13 had been fielded in 300WM. But two Sniper rifles vs area suppressing hit and run machine gun teams is a losing bet. He agreed and mentioned 6.5 calibers as a solution. I kept in touch with Jim irregularly over the years. I did not know Jim other than infrequent conversations and occasional emails. But it was very clear Jim was a person of immense experience, knowledge and professionalism. His was often the first opinion I would seek, which he freely gave. I found myself coming to some of his conclusions, long after independently covering the same ground. His input cannot be stated enough. I know everyone it the HK community knew exactly who Jim was. Unfortunately, Jim died recently. His death could not be more untimely. For the battle he had always advocated for is about to be fought. I feel it should be him telling this story.

I believe the answer to our problems is 6.5 projectiles. In my opinion, in a 2-cartridge solution. Handl Defense believes that all our solutions must fit three primary parameters. Something we produce must; improve performance, support doctrine, and show a cost benefit. Everything I’ve ever gotten approved in the military fit these three same tenets. It had to work better, be in left/right limits, and be inexpensive.

The new cartridges we adopt across the force needs to fit into these parameters as well. There is perfection and then there is effective. Perfection can be the enemy of the good. We can seek a solution that has the best performance. If it does not fit doctrinal applications and it is expensive, it will not get adopted. I see two solutions in both 7.62×51 and 5.56×45 sized platforms that fit the bill. The solutions we seek should emulate current supply chain structures as much as possible. This will reduce the cost of introduction an absolute key for adoption. I see four contenders each with their own strengths and weaknesses. I will discuss each of them superficially now. There will be a more in-depth discussion about each in their own blog post later.

What I see in small case solutions. While there are as many options as there are opinions, these two options reflect the most likely solutions to upgrade from 5.56×45.

The first option is 300 Blackout. Now before you shut down your browser or scream ” it is for suppressed use only!” There is more than meets the eye with this cartridge. Many people have been working diligently to get more out of 300 Blackout. Some of them have been successful. The issue with 300 BLK is that historically there has been much more bullet drop at comparable ranges to 5.56×45. Initial versions dropped the height of a 6 foot man in about 350-375 meters as opposed to about 450-475 meters for 5.56×45. Understand also 300 BLK required more training for the end user. You had to become more instinctive in compensating for bullet drop. Then there are issues with mechanical reliability in piston guns, they often had to be suppressed to get the extra back pressure to insure effective functioning. Handl Defense has been successful with 300 Blackout in our modified FN SCAR® 17s. But there was serious reworking of the operating group.

Regardless of its issues, the 300 BLK penetrates a target and begins to yaw in the target almost instantly. This means it carries a higher chance of being lethal round. There are some experiments with smaller 300 BLK rounds that show real promise. One 300 BLK producer who was using a blended metal technology that was claiming 700 meters with minimal bullet drop. There have been some projectiles under 120 grains that are getting 2600 fps and more. This opens the door for a EPR type of round in say 90-100 grains to make 300 BLK effective to almost 700 meters. I am sure this will require longer barrels (16 in and up). Then the fact this cartridge is based on 5.56×45, makes it a very viable option. The cost savings transitioning from 5.56×45 to 300 BLK would save millions upon millions of dollars and could be implemented very quickly.

But for a 5.56 based gun solution, 6.5 Grendel needs serious consideration. 6.5 Grendel does not use a 5.56×45 case. Even though it can hold more powder and provide higher velocities, the fact it would require a new case to be adopted is its most serious draw back. The expense of new cases on top of other new expenses cannot be discounted in these budgetary environments. One other drawback to the 6.5 Grendel is that it would also reduce the number of rounds in the magazine by four. But for these drawbacks you get serious performance that will fit in an M4. 6.5 Grendel cartridges shooting lighter bullets (90-100 grains) can achieve 2900 fps. There is equal and in certain cases superior performance from 6.5 Grendel to the 7.62×51 147 grain M80 round. Sierra states that their 123grain 6.5 bullet has 2900 joules of energy at 2700 feet per second. An EPR type M80A1 or M855A1 cartridge in 6.5 Grendel could be a powerful solution for 5.56×45 based rifles. This could be the 800 meter solution for the M4. But startup costs and fewer rounds per man in a light infantry role could very easily stymie 6.5 Grendel.

When it comes to 7.62×51 cartridge solutions, I believe the requirement is that it must fit in SR 25 pattern magazine. One other item I have always pushed for is a common 7.62×51 magazine. I believe any mid-sized cartridge must fit in legacy 7.62×51 systems with minimal retooling.

The first is 6.5 Creedmoor. My first experience with this cartridge was in early 2013. I was testing the AK conversion kit Handl Defense was developing for FN SCAR® Mk.17. Another shooter was a lane or two over with a 6.5 Creedmoor match gun. I knew of the cartridge but I had never fired it. He allowed me to fire about 30 rounds out of the rifle. It was instantly apparent this was a new beast. Flatter, faster, and seriously tight groupings. Not unlike the first time you ride a Ducati superbike, you had no idea you were going that fast.

6.5 Creedmoor is immensely popular in precision shooting circles. There is a lot of data, history, and success behind the cartridge. There are numerous advocates across all shooting disciplines. 6.5 Creedmoor has high-BC 6.5 mm bullets fired at good velocities (2700-3000fps). It has a very similar trajectory to 300 Win Mag. and less recoil than 7.62x51mm. When you look at match grade 7.62x51mm like the 175 grain M118LR, the 6.5 Creedmoor has about ¼ less wind drift. It will have about 100 inches less drop at 1000 yards. Then even with 20% lower mass, the 6.5 Creedmoor will retain 20% more energy. It will also hit the target at 1000 yards at about 300 fps more speed.

The 6.5 Creedmoor does not use 7.62×51 as its parent case, which could present the same issue with 6.5 Grendel. Which might mean the adoption of a new case system wide and the extra expenses that go with that. I have had discussions with some re-loaders who say you can make 6.5 Creedmoor from 7.62×51 cases. It just takes extra work. If used military brass can be converted to 6.5 Creedmoor easily, it will overcome its biggest stumbling block. Think of all the ASPs across the military. Think of the millions upon millions of rounds of 7.62×51. Without a way to use them and reuse them, it will be harder to justify the caliber change. Remember this decision will be made by Generals and Politicians. They do not care that one cartridge has 300 extra FPS. its BC is 4% higher, or 2% more accurate at 1000m. They care about cost to benefit ratio for project that pales in comparison of strategic impact to the JSF or Virginia class attack subs.

Which leads me to 260 Remington. This cartridge does not have a portion of the following that 6.5 Creedmoor does. It has almost all of the same performance in SAMMI spec versions as 6.5 Creedmoor. But 6.5 Creedmoor is more developed, better supported, and does perform that little better. For match shooters that little bit better is all the difference. But that does not mean that 6.5 Creedmoor is the better fit. 260 also flies much like 300 Win Mag. It also has the high BC bullets. It also will provide overmatch to the PKM.

260 Remington has two things going for it. The first is cost. To convert the metric tons of 7.62×51 brass to 260 Rem is far simpler and straight forward. Converting 7.62×51 to 6.5 Creedmoor might be just and extra step or an extra tool. When we must add an extra 3-5 cents per round and multiply it by 2 billion, that could be all the difference.

The other thing 260 Remington has going for it is a group in the government is working very hard to close the small performance gap between 260 and 6.5 CM. I do not have permission to disclose the particulars so do not bother. Handl Defense has supported this effort in the government. I understand there will be implications of bias. Regardless, an optimized 260 Remington could provide near equal the performance of 6.5 Creedmoor. It could do this cheaper both in initial startup costs and over the lifecycle of the program. This is a serious advantage that cannot be discounted.

I recognize there is a lot in this post, and others, that I do not discuss. For example, I do not discuss doctrinal applications, or if that one 6.5 bullet could work in both 5.56 cases and 7.62 cases, or bullet composition. That even when I delve into the calibers that there will be a lot I leave out. Even in these posts themselves, I cannot cover it all. These blog posts are not intended to be closing arguments. They are intended to start discussions. I know this is a highly contentious subject, so I expect vigorous debate. Additionally, the e-mails I have gotten recently and other input is not only welcome, it is exactly what I seek. It is what we should seek from each other.

My next blog post will be about the King and Queen of combat marksmanship; shot placement and energy transfer.

This blog post is in Honor of James Richard Schatz, Jr. Who died March 16, 2017. He was a paratrooper and an Army Marksmanship Unit Instructor. God Bless him and his family.

-Frank Plumb

The article was shared ny permission from Handl Defense.

PRIME Announces Ammunition Subscription Service

Monday, June 12th, 2017

NEVER WORRY ABOUT AMMUNITION AGAIN

Introducing PRIME Ammunition’s Shootscription™ Service


Las Vegas, NV, June 12, 2017– PRIME Ammunition is now offering an ammunition subscription service, dubbed Shootscription™, with the aim of providing more convenience to their customers. PRIME’s program has been designed to offer shooters of any volume the ability to accurately forecast their ammunition requirements with the convenience and peace of mind often absent when taking on the task of reordering consumables. PRIME Ammunition is able to offer this service with an unprecedented guarantee of price and availability due to their exclusive manufacturing partnership with RUAG Ammotec, the world renowned Swiss munitions company.

“You hear it pretty regularly from people who come out with new products…I worked with a talented team to build something that I personally wanted and would use on a regular basis.”, says Jim O’Shaughnessy, PRIME’s founder and CEO. He continued, “but PRIME’s Shootscripition™ service was born from the basics of how I train: I enjoy shooting, I shoot the same calibers and loads on a regular basis, I don’t enjoy shopping for ammunition, it bugs me when I can’t find the products I like, I don’t like it when prices go up, and I understand what my time is worth.”

When asked what the catch was, O’Shaughnessy replied, “It really is as simple as that. To have an uninterrupted supply of very dependable ammunition at a fair price that I don’t have to think about is the goal…it just shows up at my door on a regular basis with no contractual gotchas – that’s valuable to me. I hope our PRIME customers find Shootscriptions™ valuable and convenient as well.”

PRIME has set up their zero fee service with Shootscriber™ exclusive benefits like discounted pricing on all products, complete scalability for every type of shooter, free shipping for orders over $250 per interval, exclusive promotions, sales, and giveaways, as well as a complete guarantee of delivery and stable price.

Long time PRIME customer, multi discipline shooter and instructor, Michael Furrer, offered this testimony as to why PRIME Ammunition is his go to source for quality ammo and why Shootscriptions™ make sense to him, “I’m a business owner and rifle coach, working with juniors in Olympic style shooting and as a volunteer coach for the police department in my area. My precision long range experience began 40 years ago while in the Army. I made the decision to shoot PRIME Ammo for two primary reasons. First was quality. This ammunition is some of the most accurate consistent I have ever fired and consistency is the name of the game in long range precision shooting. The second is time. I enjoy spending my time on the range shooting, competing, coaching kids, and relaxing with my family. Why in the world would I spend my time at the reloading bench when I can get PRIME Ammunition at a competitive price? And now with an automated subscription option like this, PRIME is an even more obvious choice.”

Shootscriptions™ are available now and can be managed via your customer account dashboard. For more information, please visit www.primeammo.com/shootscription

A New 7.62 Round?

Wednesday, June 7th, 2017

Last month, Chief of Staff of the Army, GRN Mark Milley gave testimony before the Senate Armed Services Committee regarding an unspecified, new 7.62 round which can defeat threat body armor. The Program Manager, Maneuver Ammunition Systems recently gave a presentation on the capabilities of the Army’s current small arms ammunition at Ft Bragg. This target coupon was shown as an example of 5.56mm and 7.62mm rounds being shot at 3/8″ mild steel from a distance of 300m.

Long story short, the ammunition is better than ever. The 5.56mm ammunition is optimized to offer the desired effect on target. Its 7.62mm equivalent, M80A1, went through that steel like a hot knife through butter.

Even the 5.56mm M855A1 makes quick work of threats, as long as it hits the target. The Army has excellent ammunition; now it needs to work on improving its combat marksmanship.

Photos via 82nd Airborne Division Master Gunner page on Facebook.

Rampart Range Day 2017 – AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems

Tuesday, May 30th, 2017

AMTEC Less-Lethal Systems is exhibiting their 460 Tactical Bang Strip. It’s compact and can be remotely detonated or detonated via time delay. They often use the strip in conjunction with IV bags to breach doors.

www.lesslethal.com

Barnes Product Safety Recall Notice

Thursday, May 25th, 2017

Product Safety Recall Notice
Warning

Do not use Barnes 300 Weatherby 180 grain TTSX VOR-TX Ammunition with Lot Numbers: Z08SA15L, Z08SB15L, Z09SA15L, Z09SB15L, Z11SB15L, Z11SC15L, Z12SA15L, Z12SB15L, Z12SC15L, Z08SA15R, Z08SB15R, Z09SA15R, Z09SB15R, Z11SB15R, Z11SC15R, Z12SA15R, Z12SB15R, Z12SC15R

Barnes Bullets, LLC determined that eighteen (18) Lots of its Barnes Bullets, LLC 300 Weatherby 180 grain TTSX VOR-TX ammunition (the “Ammunition”) packaged product may contain cartridges of a different caliber (collectively, the “Affected Product”). The eighteen (18) Lot Numbers are identified above. Firing a rifle with the incorrect caliber of ammunition may result in damage to the firearm, serious personal injury, or death.


To determine if you have Affected Product, please note the following:

• If you have a case of the Ammunition, the Lot Number is stenciled on the outside of the case; and,
• If you have a box of the Ammunition, the Lot Number is stamped on the inside flap of the box.

If you have Affected Product, immediately discontinue use of it and contact Barnes at the telephone number below. Barnes will arrange for the return shipment of your Affected Product and, upon receipt, will send you replacement Ammunition at no cost to you. If you are unsure whether you have Affected Product or if you have mixed boxes of ammunition, please immediately discontinue the use of the ammunition and contact Barnes Bullets, LLC at the below telephone number – we will replace this ammunition for you. For any other questions relating to the return of Affected Product, please contact the Barnes Consumer Service Department at 435-856-1115.

We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Safety First

Always observe Remington’s Ten Commandments of Firearm Safety and wear approved eye and ear protection anytime you are shooting.

SIG SAUER Expands its 9mm FMJ Ammunition Offerings

Wednesday, May 10th, 2017

Newington, NH (May 9, 2017) – SIG SAUER, Inc. is pleased to announce the expansion of its 9mm full metal jacket (FMJ) Elite Performance Ammunition offerings with the addition of 124gr and 147gr bullet weights. With these new rounds, SIG customers now have three 9mm bullet weights – 115gr, 124gr and 147gr – available in both the V-Crown® jacketed hollow point (JHP) personal defense ammunition and the SIG FMJ target loads.

The perfect combination of affordability and performance, the SIG FMJ ball ammunition is designed to approximate the performance of the corresponding JHP loads, making a seamless transition from target ammo to carry ammo. The copper-coated lead bullets in the SIG FMJ ammunition were engineered to have the most precise, uniform profile, resulting in consistent accuracy.

“SIG FMJ ammunition is designed specifically for practice and competition shooting, and given the sheer popularity of the 9mm caliber, expanding the FMJ line to mirror the V-Crown offerings was an important next step,” said Dan Powers, President of the SIG SAUER Ammunition Division. “These premium target rounds feed as smoothly as our V-Crown JHP rounds and perform and feel almost identical to the V-Crown loads when shooting, making them ideal practice rounds.”

Manufactured to meet or exceed SAAMI specifications, the SIG FMJ centerfire pistol cartridges feature solid brass cases and durable copper jacketed bullets that stay with the lead at impact. Dependable primers and clean-burning powders are used for reduced barrel fouling and more reliable functioning. All SIG SAUER Elite Performance Ammunition is manufactured by SIG SAUER at its new ammunition manufacturing facility in Jacksonville, Arkansas to the same exacting standards as the company’s premium pistols and rifles. For more information, visit www.sigsauer.com/ammunition.