Quantico Tactical

MBITR Tip Out Radio Pouch from ATS Tactical

One of the major shortcomings of current issue load carrying systems is the lack of any radio pouch let a lone a decent one. If a pouch does come with your military radio at all, chances are good it was thrown in as an afterthought by the radio manufacturer. Does anybody remember this awful Black ballistic nylon pouches with the ALICE clips?

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ATS Tactical has introduced their answer to the problem with the Tip Out Radio Pouch. The design was inspired by an 18E, specifically for use with the MBITR which has now seen widespread use among SOF and conventional forces alike, it does exactly what its name implies. Once mounted on your equipment, it “tips out” so that you can more easily manipulate the radio. Yet, it remains attached to your vest. The ITW hardware can be manipulated one-handed for ease of use.

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Available in MultiCam, Coyote Brown, and Ranger Green. Like all ATS brand gear, it is made in the USA and covered by a lifetime warranty against manufacturer defects in materials and workmanship.

www.atstacticalgear.com

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9 Responses to “MBITR Tip Out Radio Pouch from ATS Tactical”

  1. majrod says:

    GREAT IDEA!

  2. Mike says:

    Tilt-out has been done before, notably by High Ground and Tyr, but this looks like it not only tilts out but allows you to get it out a bit and really look at it. Looks good!

    • Bryan says:

      You’re absolutely right that tilt-out has been done before and I would like to add TAG to the list, as that is the pouch I have personal experience with.

      In respect to your second comment, I really don’t see that as a plus. The TAG pouch and the High Ground pouch have a 550 cord tether that prevents the pouch from extending too far and also allow for hands free operation.

      I wish ATS would have added a similar tether to their MBITR pouch but until then, I’ll be sticking with TAG.

      • Haji says:

        The reason we didn’t is because everybody we discussed this with end users who said they’d never have the radio tilted out and not in their hand. Some of our beta testers took it afield and verified that, so we left it out to keep the cost down.

        • Toby says:

          This is right, the only reason you’d have it tipped out is to check or modify channel/crypto/etc, and for that I wouldn’t want to be relying on 550 cord to take the weight of me jamming buttons
          With the HGG/Tyr/TAG models you’re more restricted when your using it tipped out because of the tether, so since you’ll be holding/supporting the radio anyway it makes sense to do away with the tether
          The only downside I can see is if the buckle fails then the radio is just gonna drop and slide out

  3. Diddler says:

    If my eyes don’t deceive me, that’s the split front rig I spec’d to which the MBITR pouch is attached. Been running them both in theater for a while now. They are awesome. The great thing about the tip out pouch is that it’s super low profile, and incredibly light. I haven’t used every pouch out there, but this one is by far the lightest and slimmest I’ve used.

    • Haji says:

      Shhh! I just finished the first draft of the description of the split front. The rig in the photo is the 7.62 Modular Chest Harness. The Split Front is a lighter, more streamlined design that I’m going to need one of. I’ll get the particulars to SSD ASAP. The first run came out of the factory, straight to a pallet and were gone before I got much more than a glance at ’em.

    • Haji says:

      Shhh! That’s still secret. LOL! I just finished the first draft of the description of the split front. The rig in the photo is the 7.62 Modular Chest Harness. The Split Front is a lighter, more streamlined design that I’m going to need one of. I’ll get the particulars to SSD ASAP. The first run came out of the factory, straight to a pallet and were gone before I got much more than a glance at ’em.

  4. Rob says:

    This piece of kit is nice if you dont have any cables or antenna attched. Anyone who has used this equipment would tell you that to take full advantage of the “tilt” you would have have to disconnect the antenna and PTT from the radio. Painful. This would be an aweosme idea for a GPS or Smart phone.