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Archive for the ‘Mobility’ Category

Maxim Defense Develops PDX Insert for Raptor Motorcycle Saddlebags

Friday, October 18th, 2019

At the request of a LE motorcycle unit, Maxim Defense has developed a PDX insert for Raptor Motorcycle Saddlebags.

It accommodates the PDX 300 and three magazines.

It can be inserted in a Raptor motorcycle saddlebag.

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Deployment is quick.

Contact www.maximdefense.com

AUSA 19 – General Motors Infantry Squad Vehicle Candidate

Thursday, October 17th, 2019

General Motors displayed their ISV candidate at AUSA.

It’s on the Chevrolet Colorado midsize truck architecture and its ZR2 and ZR2 Bison variants, supplemented with both custom and commercially available parts proven by Chevy Performance engineering in more than 10,000 miles of punishing off-road development and desert racing in the Best in the Desert Racing series.

Powered by a 186-horsepower, 2.8L diesel powerplant and six-speed automatic transmission, the nine man crew is protected by a Roll Over Protection System which serves as a roll bar. It can be stored for air transport.

AUSA 19 – SAIC Showcases Polaris DAGOR for Infantry Squad Vehicle Requirement

Wednesday, October 16th, 2019

Of the many Army initiatives to improve the capability of its Close Combat Forces, the Infantry Squad Vehicle program offers mobility to the light infantry squad. It carries nine Soldiers and the roll over protection system protects those seated in the bed from injury, but can be rotated forward for internal transport in a CH-47. It can also be sling under a UH-60 or airdropped.

The SAIC-Polaris team has delivered a baseline vehicle sample to soldiers in the 82nd Airborne Division for soldier assessment. The DAGOR vehicle can carry up to nine soldiers with their equipment and supplies. It provides the speed, mobility and communications support Army small units require to obtain and maintain situational awareness of the battlefield.

General Dynamics at AUSA 2019: Investing Now in the US Army’s Future

Monday, October 14th, 2019

Stryker A1 MCWS: The Stryker A1 Medium Caliber Weapon System is the next generation of the Stryker Infantry Carrier Vehicle Dragoon (ICVD), which is currently in theater with the Army’s 2nd Cavalry Regiment in Europe. Featuring a lethal 30mm cannon mounted on a combat-proven Double-V Hull chassis, the Stryker A1 Medium Caliber Weapons Systems was successfully live fired in August 2019. It provides a solution for the Army’s operational need for greater lethality in the Stryker fleet. This low-risk, proven solution is ready to meet the Army’s program timelines.

 See it in Booth #803.

Night Driving With The Boyz…

Monday, October 7th, 2019

This photo was taken by Army Photojournalist, SGT Henry Villarama and posted to his Instagram account.

I took this photo last night while photographing our brigade’s new Army Ground Mobility Vehicles.

I took this photo around 2230. There wasn’t much illumination from the moon and there wasn’t much I could grab from the sky.

I was having zero luck capturing the GMV moving in the night. After a few runs with these guys driving past me at 40mph, I decided to paint the vehicle with the lights from my headlamp.

White light was lame and everyone has seen red light photos. I decided to use the blue. I think it works just fine.

Here are the settings I used to take this photo:

Nikon D500 | 13mm | 7 seconds | f/5 | ISO 4000

My name is Henry Villarama. I’m an American paratrooper, photographer and student of leadership. I am proud to visually articulate the work of our Paratroopers and Soldiers to the world every day. It’s an honor to serve and I greatly appreciate the unique opportunity I have to tell our Army’s story through photography.

Follow SGT Villarama on Instagram instagram.com/villarama_photo

Fine-tuning the Corps’ Amphibious Combat Vehicle in Preparation for IOT&E

Friday, October 4th, 2019

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

Three thousand miles away from the epicenter of Marine Corps Amphibious Combat Vehicle acquisition, a cadre of Marines, civilians and contractors are hard at work completing a logistics demonstration effort on the vehicle.

The logistics demonstration effort—or Log Demo—is one of the last steps the Advanced Amphibious Assault program office at Program Executive Officer Land Systems needs to execute before training Marines in the Operating Forces to use and maintain the vehicle during IOT&E, the integrated operational test and evaluation activities scheduled for next year.

“Log Demo’s main purpose is to verify the validity and accuracy of the ACV’s technical manuals,” said Tommy “TJ” Pittman, Log Demo’s technical manager lead for PM AAA. “We want to make sure that the Marine can do the job, given the technical manual, training and tools [provided to them].”

For the logistics demonstration team, this means individually reviewing and performing nearly 1,500 work package procedures in the Interactive Electronic Technical Manual designed for Marines in charge of vehicle maintenance.

The demo also involves reviewing 125 work packages—spanning over 2,000 pages—in the Electronic Technical Manual designed for Marine ACV operators. The Common Remotely Operated Weapons System—or CROWS—on the ACV also has its own technical manual that the team must verify.

“This is less about our ability to perform the task or our skills as a mechanic, and more about whether the IETM can direct us to do the task properly” said Staff Sgt. Justin Hanush, lead ACV maintenance instructor for Advanced Amphibious Assault program office’s new equipment training team at PEO LS. “We’re painstakingly going through the IETM word-for-word, letter-by-letter, illustrations, everything—to make sure we can do the task as the IETM is written.”

A next-generation technical manual for a next-generation vehicle

The IETM is especially noteworthy because, for the Marine Corps, it’s the first of its kind for ground vehicles.

“I’ve personally worked for 15 years on getting the Marine Corps an interactive electronic tech manual that can be updated within moments,” said Pittman.

As a former Assault Amphibious Vehicle operator, the 24-year Marine Corps veteran has extensive experience operating and maintaining vehicles in the amphibious assault community. Pittman worked with Army Aviation and Missile Command to integrate the ACV’s IETM onto their software system and servers.

The interactive aspect of the technical manual streamlines the diagnostic and troubleshooting process Marines use when performing maintenance on a vehicle. By collaborating with the Army on a virtual manual, the Marine Corps can also reduce the amount of time needed to make updates to the IETM.

In the past, it could take up to a year for the technical manual for the ACV’s predecessor, the Assault Amphibious Vehicle, to be updated, said Hanush. With the introduction of the new IETM software, updates to the technical manual are implemented overnight.

On the ACV operator side, the team is ensuring their technical manual is clearly written so Marines can properly operate the vehicle and provide first-level maintenance on the vehicle if needed, said Sgt. Jarrod Warren, lead ACV operator instructor for the NETT.

“It’s important that the outcomes we reach when going through the ETM are the same outcomes stated in the book,” said Warren. “It’s also important to make sure we can maintain the vehicle at our level and, if not, we know when to bring it up to the maintenance side.”

The importance of meticulously reviewing the technical manuals to ensure the validity and accuracy of the document is not lost on Hanush, who noted, “I could have grandchildren someday who join the Marine Corps, and they could be working off the manual that I’m helping to write.”

Technical manual writing aside, Hanush is appreciative of the dedication of his fellow Marines during Log Demo, saying, “I couldn’t ask for a better group of ACV mechanics. They’re knocking it out of the park.”

One team, one fight, under one roof

Unlike other logistic demonstrations undertaken by the Corps, which typically take place at a contractor’s facility, this one takes place at the Marine Corps’ Amphibious Vehicle Test Branch at Camp Pendleton, California.

The three-month logistics demonstration took more than a year-and-a-half to plan, said Pittman. He said a unique aspect of Log Demo was that the program office, rather than the contractor, planned and created the logistics demonstration plan.

Equally critical to the success of the Log Demo effort are PM AAA’s industry partners, whose participation spans multiple states and continents, and whose roles vary from field service representatives to technical illustrators.

“We have about 65 individuals on the ground here, between the Marines, civilians, BAE, and one foreign representative from Iveco, which is the subcontractor to BAE on the vehicle,” said Pittman. “We have the right people—the writers, the illustrators, the engineers, the Marines, the data collectors, the safety people and the —in one location, which makes communication between the groups so much easier.”

Moving forward to IOT&E

Currently, the Marines on the NETT are the Corps’ uniformed subject matter experts on the ACV. Following Log Demo, Hanush, Warren and the rest of the NETT will use the verified training manuals as their guide to train and prepare Marines for IOT&E.

IOT&E is the program office’s final evaluation of the ACV before fielding the vehicle. During IOT&E, executed by Marine Corps Operational Test and Evaluation Activity, the NETT will take a step back from operating and maintaining the vehicle and instead enable Marines to put the vehicle through its paces.

“IOT&E is sort of like a dress rehearsal for the system,” said Maj. Scott Jennings, a project officer at MCOTEA who will be involved with IOT&E of the ACV. “Marines will operate the vehicle in realistic environments and go on realistic missions so that we can evaluate the operational suitability and effectiveness of the system and see if it does what we want it to do in the way we want to do it.”

Until then, PM AAA’s focus is to ensure the ACV is ready for use. The modernized vehicle brings the Corps’ amphibious assault capabilities back to the forefront and will assist Marines in reestablishing themselves as a naval expeditionary force-in-readiness prepared to operate inside actively contested maritime spaces in support of fleet operations.

“I believe wholeheartedly in the mission these [Marines] do out there because I’ve been there,” said Pittman, who has dedicated over 48 years of his life to the assault amphibious community as an active duty Marine and a civilian. “I believe that we need to give them the best assets that we can possibly put in their hands, to not only save their lives, but to also protect our freedom.”

By Ashley Calingo, PEO Land Systems Public Affairs | Marine Corps Systems Command

Raytheon Rheinmetall Land Systems Selects US Manufacturer for Army Combat Vehicle Competition

Thursday, October 3rd, 2019

Textron Systems Joins Lynx Team
TUCSON, Ariz., Sept. 30, 2019 — Raytheon Rheinmetall Land Systems, a joint venture of Raytheon Company (NYSE: RTN) and Rheinmetall Defence, has selected Textron Systems as the U.S. chassis manufacturer for the Lynx Infantry Fighting Vehicle. The team of industry leaders is offering Lynx to meet the U.S. Army’s requirement for an Optionally Manned Fighting Vehicle (OMFV).

“Building Lynx in America will support U.S. manufacturing jobs and revitalize the nation’s defense industrial base,” said Sam Deneke, Raytheon Land Warfare Systems vice president. “Textron Systems is an experienced manufacturer central to our strategy of leveraging a reliable U.S. supply chain to deliver the world’s most advanced combat vehicle to the U.S. Army.”

Textron Systems brings unique capabilities in hull fabrication, rolling chassis assembly, integration and testing to the OMFV program. The company will support final integration during the development and prototyping phase of the program. In parallel, Textron Systems will prepare to build the Lynx chassis during future production phases. Textron Systems intends to perform the work at its Slidell, Louisiana, manufacturing facility.

“When we say Lynx will be built in America, we mean it,” said Ben Hudson, global head of Rheinmetall’s Vehicle Systems Division. “Together with Textron Systems, we will provide the Army with a next-generation combat vehicle that will protect troops and give them a significant advantage in battle.”  

The U.S. Army’s OMFV, scheduled for fielding in 2026, is expected to replace the legacy Bradley Fighting Vehicle.

“Textron Systems brings a decades-long heritage of supporting the U.S. Department of Defense and its allies with highly reliable and capable combat vehicles to enhance mission outcomes,” said Lisa Atherton, president and CEO of Textron Systems. “We are proud to be a part of the Lynx team and stand ready to support our teammates and our customer.”

Lynx is a true next-generation, tracked armored fighting vehicle designed to address the critical challenges of the future battlefield. Lynx provides an overmatch advantage for soldiers, growth capacity to support new technologies over the vehicle’s lifetime, and lower life-cycle costs.

Raytheon technology offered for inclusion on Lynx for the U.S. Army includes the company’s advanced weapons, Active Protection System, next-generation thermal sights, the Coyote® unmanned aircraft system, as well as cyber protection.

I Must Admit, I’m Intrigued

Monday, September 23rd, 2019