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Archive for the ‘Suppressors’ Category

MDM 17 – Super Night Owl Suppressor by Geissele Automatics

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

This is Bill Geissele holding the Super Night Owl Suppressor which was developed for a special application. Look for details tomorrow on SSD.

www.geissele.com

SilencerCo Releases First-Ever 50-State-Legal Suppressed Muzzleloader

Tuesday, September 19th, 2017

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WEST VALLEY CITY, UT – September 19, 2017 – For the first time since the National Firearms Act (NFA) was created in 1934, civilians can enjoy suppressed shooting in all 50 states with SilencerCo’s latest innovation: the integrally suppressed Maxim 50 muzzleloader. In addition, this product can be purchased right now on the web with no regulation (no 4473, no tax stamp, no photographs or fingerprints) at store.silencerco.com and be shipped immediately to the purchaser with few exceptions*.

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Residents in the 42 states that allow civilian ownership of silencers have to pay a $200 tax, fill out forms, send in photos, submit to fingerprinting, and wait months for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives (BATFE) and the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) to review their forms and check their backgrounds—just to acquire an inherently-harmless product. With all the hoops to jump through, it’s no surprise that many Americans have difficulty committing the time or money it takes to save their hearing. Citizens may have had their Second Amendment rights suppressed, but innovation cannot be silenced.

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With the invention of the Maxim 50, SilencerCo has created a product that is 100% legal for civilian ownership in all 50 states while providing hearing-saving suppression at a reasonable price point. How is this possible? By paying very close attention to the law.

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The BATFE defines a silencer as a “device for silencing, muffling, or diminishing the report of a portable firearm . . .” By that definition, a silencer is only a silencer if it can attach to a firearm. The Maxim 50 is built on the base of a Traditions™ Vortek Strikerfire Muzzleloader. For those who know muzzleloaders, you’ll also know that they are not considered firearms by the BATFE but are instead antique firearms, a definition and difference that is very distinct. Because of this, a moderator that is permanently affixed to a muzzleloader is not legally defined as a silencer, since it does not attach to a firearm. With this realization, the Maxim 50 was born.

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“It took a lot of creativity to arrive at this solution,” said Josh Waldron, SilencerCo CEO and Co-Founder. “We have been working on this product for three years, with most of that time spent waiting on a determination from the Technology Branch of the BATFE as to how this product would be classified. As soon as we received official word that it wouldn’t be considered or regulated as a silencer, we got to work on bringing the Maxim 50 to customers across the country.”

SilencerCo expects the Maxim 50 to be a hit not only with the NFA-loving crowd, but also with hobbyists and hunters. In many states, muzzleloader hunting begins days (sometimes weeks) before standard rifle season, giving hunters using this platform an edge. But this edge does come with caveats – antique firearms are usually loud, have lots of recoil, and the shooter has to battle the thick cloud of black powder smoke billowing from the barrel as they try to see if their shot connected with their game. The Maxim 50 solves all of the issues experienced by muzzleloader shooters while also drastically reducing the resulting smoke by more than two-thirds, allowing hunters to see the location of their shot and track their game.

SilencerCo is honored to finally be able to bring suppressed shooting to its customers across the country, especially in states such as California, Illinois, and New York, where civilian ownership of silencers is not currently allowed.
To see more on the Maxim 50 visit silencerco.com/maxim50.

* Visit SilencerCo’s website for a complete list of shipping restrictions.

SureFire Ryder 22-Mini Suppressor Now Shipping

Thursday, August 31st, 2017

Fountain Valley, CA—SureFire, LLC, manufacturer of the world’s finest—and most innovative—illumination tools and tactical products, is proud to announce the launch of the all new SF RYDER™ 22-MINI suppressor. The RYDER 22-MINI offers the same great benefits to that of the RYDER 22-S only now in a more compact, shorter overall length with minimal increase in sound attenuation. The 22-MINI is optimized to strike the perfect balance between length, weight, and sound for rifles. The 22-MINI features heat-treated stainless steel baffles that offer increased durability and is capable of handling pressures of 17 HMR and .22 WMR ammunition—even full-auto fire. These simple-to-maintain suppressors are easy to disassemble and clean, thanks to individually numbered and indexed baffles that provide quick, easy reassembly. A fluted aluminum body helps reduce weight. The stainless steel back section utilizes a 1/2 X 28 single-point-cut stainless steel thread that quickly and securely attaches to the host weapon.

Learn More: www.surefire.com/sf-ryder-22-mini

Black Aces Tactical Announces a New Suppressor at $199 for Both the .30 and 7.62mm Platforms

Monday, August 21st, 2017

Black Aces Tactical (BAT), an American manufacturer best known for its patented custom shotguns, is excited to announce the release of the company’s new PoBoy suppressor for both the 30 caliber and 7.62 models.

Said Lemoine, “Riding on the immense success of Pro Series 56 PoBoy suppressor, the customer demand for the both 30 Cal and 7.62mm suppressors has been nothing short of incredible. We at Black Aces Tactical have listened. Our larger caliber cans employ the same simple technologies found in our 556 models while being reinforced to take the punishment administered by the larger, more powerful rounds. And as always the end goal was to give the customer a suppressor they can be proud of while offering it to them for a price that is accessible and makes sense.”

At just $199 retail – with even the least expensive silencers on the market coming in at nearly over the price – customers are finally now able to purchase a quality suppressor at less than the cost of the required NFA tax stamp.

“For years, the suppressor industry has been producing an increasingly complex and costly product with little change in performance,” said Eric Lemoine, CEO of Black Aces Tactical states. “We were confident we could manufacture a simple yet rugged product that meets and surpasses expectations, while being affordable for gun owners.”

Named the Pro Series 30 and Pro Series 47 respectively, the “Po’Boy”, the suppressor features a number of details only found on much more expensive models offered by other manufactures. The “Po’Boy” not only quiets the report of an AK47 by 30+ decibels, it also is able to handle the more powerful rounds up to a 338 Lapua. It is fully automatic capable and the finish boasts 2000 degree cerakote. And in what might be Po’Boy’s trump card, the suppressor is fully serviceable by the end user using an AR15 stock wrench

“Through ingenuity and innovation, Black Aces Tactical has used a combination of time-tested design and modern technology to produce a suppressor that is as strong as it is quiet and affordable,” said Lemoine.

For more information about Black Aces Tactical, contact Eric Lemoine at 407-630-9359, email sales@blackacestactical.com, or visit www.blackacestactical.com.

ASA Statement Regarding Potential ATF Determination On Modular Suppressors

Friday, August 11th, 2017

ATLANTA, GA – Over the past week, multiple claims have stated that the BATFE’s Firearms and Ammunition Technology Division (FATD) is in the process of issuing an industry wide determination on the legality of modular suppressors. After speaking at length to several of our contacts within ATF, ASA has concluded that these assertions stem from misinterpreted comments made by ATF officials at a recent industry conference. According to our contacts at ATF, these are the facts related to three separate areas of discussion:

Modular Suppressor Design – FATD is in the process of reviewing a request from an independent industry representative regarding a single, specific modular suppressor design. The representative is seeking a determination regarding their specific product, not a blanket determination that would apply to other existing modular designs. The issue in question is whether or not the suppressor being reviewed has the ability to assemble more than one functional suppressor out of the component parts that are supplied as a single suppressor to the end-user.

ATF 29P – On May 4, 2016, ATF published an Advance Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (ANPRM) in response to an eight year old request by the National Firearms Act Trade & Collectors Association (NFATCA) made in 2008. In the ANPRM, ATF sought to specify that manufacturers must mark the outer tube of suppressors, not just any externally visible part. The ASA, along with many members of the industry, submitted comments to the ATF opposing ATF 29P. We have been told by ATF that 29P is no longer being worked on by the Bureau, as many current suppressor designs without an outer tube have made the proposed rules within 29P obsolete.

NFA Handbook – The NFA Division and Firearms & Explosives Industry Division are working on a long overdue update to the NFA Handbook. Within the updated handbook, new language will be included that addresses the repair or replacement of modular suppressor components. This language will be consistent with previously published guidance, which states that the serialized component of a suppressor cannot be replaced without the filing of a new Form 2 by the manufacturer, and a new Form 4 by the consumer, including the payment of applicable transfer taxes. Unmarked components of a modular suppressor may be replaced by a licensed manufacturer on a one-for-one basis, just as previously allowed in the silencer FAQ published by ATF on April 17, 2008.

In summation, there are currently no widespread determinations set to be issued by ATF with regards to modular suppressors.

americansuppressorassociation.com

Marine Corps Is Looking At Commercially Available Suppressors, Issues Sources Sought Notice To Industry

Thursday, August 10th, 2017

Last week, the Marine Corps Systems Command (MARCORSYSCOM) issued a Sources Sought Notice, often also referred to a Request For Information (RFI) to industry for commerically available suppressors for the 5.56mm NATO M4, M4A1, and M27. The RFI is an important step in developing a realistic requirement which leads to a solicitation and eventually, procurement.

Marine Gunner Christian Wade (seen above) has been a big advocate of suppressing Marine weapons, even producing videos to educate Marines of their true capabilities. It’s good to see the Marines catching up with his vision.

They’ve certainly done their homework and have developed quite a list of what they are looking for. Additionally, they are keeping their options open, stating that future procurement quantities of suppressors could span between 18,000 and 194,000.

According to the RFI, at a minimum, suppressors should meet the following requirements:

1. The suppressor should be capable of detachment/attachment and disassembly/ reassembly by an operator in the field without the use of special tools for normal care and cleaning.

2. Suppressor should enable a noise level of 139 decibels or lower at either of the shooters ears.

3. Suppressor should be a design that minimizes the change in the host rifle internal operating system dynamics.

4. Suppressor may be of the over the barrel, or flush mount design and should not be longer than 20″ total barrel length (threshold), 18″ (objective).

5. Suppressor should be of the quick detachable design. A special muzzle device may be attached (by a unit Armorer) to the OEM weapon in order to facilitate installation and removal by an operator.

6. Must be able to withstand the sustained rate of the M27 IAR (capable of a rate of fire of 36 rounds per minute for 16 minutes, 40 seconds with firing starting at ambient temperature for a 600 round load).

7. The entire suppressor and muzzle device should weigh no more than 18 oz.

8. The use of the suppressor should not increase the dispersion of each respective weapon. It is acceptable for the weapon to experience a repeatable shift in the zero between unsuppressed and suppressed operating modes, but that shift should not exceed 3 MOA for each respective weapon.

9. The suppressed weapon should retain its dispersion through the life of the barrel (objective of 24,000 rounds)

10. The suppressor system is not required to have an internal projectile pathway which is the usual industry standard for a 5.56mm diameter round. The internal bullet channel may be larger than is typical of current suppressor designs. In other words, the suppressor may be able to be employed on multiple calibers (i.e. A059 Ball, AB49, AC12, AB57 etc.) without any modification to the suppressor. This attribute not only facilitates future caliber/weapon capabilities, but could also mitigate baffle strikes.

11. Suppressor should function with all Department of Defense Identification Code (DODIC) 5.56 mm ammunition, including A059 Ball, A063 Tracer, A080 Blank, AA33 Ball, AA53 Ball Special Match, AA69 Armor Piercing, AB49 Ball Carbine barrier, AC12 and AB57 Enhanced Performance Round.

12. Suppressor should not require permanent configuration changes to the weapon system.

13. Suppressor should not inhibit the mounting or operation of the M203 or M320 grenade launchers (objective).

14. Suppressor should not require the addition of a gas mitigating charging handle.

15. Should be able to accept a suppressor sleeve in order to reduce thermal signatures and mitigate operator burns.

16. All suppressor external surfaces should have a dull, low-reflective finish (to include pins, bolts, lanyards, sight posts, etc.). The external color of the system should be consistent with current camouflage colors and patterns.

18. The suppressor material should be able to accept approved USMC paint (e.g. rattle-can spray paint).

19. Suppressor should be resistant to corrosion, abrasion, impacts and chemicals, including standard Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) decontaminants.

20. The suppressor should resist maritime corrosion and/or effects of carbon/copper/lead fouling.
• MIL-L-46000C – Lubricant, Semi-fluid (Automatic Weapons)
• MIL-PRF-372D – Cleaning Compound, Solvent (Bore of Small Arms and Automatic Aircraft Weapons)
• MIL-PRF-14107D – Lubricating Oil, Weapons, Low Temperature
• MIL-PRF-63460D – Lubricant, Cleaner and Preservative for Weapons and Weapons Systems

22. The suppressor should not require a more frequent cleaning schedule than the weapon system.

23. The system, with suppressor attached should continue to operate and safely function after exposure to blowing dust, mud, salt fog, rain, and icing/freezing rain environments as specified in US Army Development Test Operations Procedure (TOP) 3-2-045 (Small Arms – Hand and Shoulder Weapons and Machineguns) dated Sep 2007.

24. The system, with suppressor attached should be able to withstand the shock from a user performing individual movement techniques in combat, and the vibrations of being transported in standard military aircraft and ground vehicles as loose cargo, without degradation of performance.

25. The system, with suppressor attached should continue to safely function after being dropped in any orientation from a 1.7 meter height onto a smooth concrete or steel surface at temperatures ranging from -25º Fahrenheit (F) to 140º F. The addition of the suppressor on the weapon system should not result in a discharge when dropped from this height.

26. The system, with suppressor attached should safely function through a temperature range of -25º F to +140º F without degradation of performance.

27. In addition to the suppressor, request information on the ability of industry to provide a BFA type suppressor (that looks like, operates like and weighs the same as the live fire suppressor). This BFA type suppressor should be capable of catching a live 5.56mm round. This BFA suppressor should also be easily distinguished as a training device only.

Those interested in providing information to MARCORSYSCOM have until September 6th.  Visit www.fbo.gov for full details. 

Dead Air Armament Gives Us A Tease

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

Hearing Protection Act Language Incorporates Into Comprehensive Sportsmens Package

Tuesday, June 13th, 2017

This is some great news regarding the future of removing suppressors from the National Firearms Act. Most of us have heard of the Hearing Protection Act, a bill championed by the American Suppressor Association which seems to have recently lost steam. But, they’ve been working hard behind the scenes to make the language even more effective and to package it into new legislation with more sponsors and additional enhancements for outdoorsmen amd firearms owners.

WASHINGTON, D.C. – The House Committee on Natural Resources has scheduled a hearing for the morning of June 14, in which the Federal Lands Subcommittee will hear a discussion draft of the Sportsmen’s Heritage and Recreational Enhancement (SHARE) Act. The SHARE Act, which is being championed in a bipartisan manner by Congressional Sportsmen’s Caucus (CSC) Co-Chairs Representative Jeff Duncan (R-SC), and Representative Gene Green (D-TX), is a comprehensive package that covers a wide range of hunting, fishing, and outdoor related issues. Included in the legislation is Title XVII, a strengthened version of the Hearing Protection Act.

Since the re-introduction of the Hearing Protection Act by Rep. Duncan and Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) in January (H.R. 367, S. 59) the American Suppressor Association (ASA) has met with the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF) on multiple occasions to discuss technical amendments to the language. As a result, we were able to create several technical amendments that were incorporated into the current draft of the SHARE Act. These include:

Sec. 1702: Removing suppressors from the National Firearms Act, subjecting them to the same instant NICS background check as long guns, and issuing a refundable tax credit to anyone who has purchased a suppressor since the HPA’s original date of introduction
Sec. 1703: Ensuring that suppressors will remain legal in all 42 states where they are currently legal, after suppressors are removed from the National Firearms Act
Sec. 1704: Preempting states from levying taxes or registration requirements on suppressors. However, this will not make suppressors legal in any state where state law currently prohibits them.
Sec. 1705: Granting the ATF 365 days to destroy all suppressor related records from the National Firearms Registration and Transfer Record (NFRTR)
Sec. 1706: Developing a “keystone part” definition, and requiring that such keystone part is serialized on every suppressor. This will ensure that individual suppressor parts, like pistons and endcaps, will not require serialization.
Sec. 1707: Imposing a 10% Pittman-Robertson excise tax on the manufacture of each new suppressor, a tax that is currently imposed on all Title I firearms

“The inclusion of the Hearing Protection Act in the sportsmen’s package highlights the commitment of the Sportsmen’s Caucus to make the hunting and recreational shooting experiences safer and more enjoyable for all,” said Knox Williams, President and Executive Director of the American Suppressor Association. “We know for a fact that exposure to noise from recreational firearms is one of the leading causes of hearing loss, which is why the CDC, NIOSH, and the National Hearing Conservation Association (NHCA) have all recommended using suppressors as a tool to mitigate the danger. We look forward to working with the Sportsmen’s Caucus to make this legislation a reality.”

Suppressors have been federally regulated since the passage of the National Firearms Act of 1934. Currently, prospective buyers must live in one of the 42 states where they are legal, must send in an application including fingerprints and passport photos to the ATF, pay a $200 transfer tax, and wait for an indeterminate amount of time for the ATF to process the application. As of June, 2017, wait times are in excess of 10 months. In stark contrast, many countries in Europe place no regulations on their purchase, possession, or use. This legislation will remove suppressors from the onerous requirements of the NFA, and instead require purchasers to pass an instant NICS check, the same background check that is used during the sale of long guns. In doing so, law-abiding citizens will remain free to purchase suppressors, while prohibited persons will continue to be barred from purchasing or possessing these accessories.

To voice your support for the Hearing Protection Act, visit www.HearingProtectionAct.com.