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Archive for the ‘MARCORSYSCOM’ Category

Marine Corps Systems Command to Showcase Tech, Innovation at Sea Air Space

Sunday, April 8th, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, VA. —

As the Marine Corps presses towards modernization to meet the demands of the strategic environment, Marine Corps Systems Command will showcase some of its latest gear at the 53rd annual Sea Air Space Exposition April 9-11 at the Gaylord Convention Center in National Harbor, Maryland.

“This year’s exhibit demonstrates a slice of what our Command is doing to equip our Marines,” said command spokesperson Barb Hamby. “The future maritime environment and threat landscape requires the latest advances in technology to outperform our competitors in lethality, speed, maneuverability, and fires.”

The following systems and equipment will be showcased in the MARCORSYSCOM booth #2705:

Target Handoff System Version 2

The Target Handoff System Version 2, or THS V.2, is a portable system designed for use by dismounted Marines to locate targets, pinpoint global positioning coordinates and call for close air, artillery and naval fire support using secure digital communications. Marine Corps Systems Command will feature the THS V.2 along with other equipment at the Sea Air Space Exposition April 9-11. (U.S. Air Force Photo by Staff Sgt. Joe Laws)

The Target Handoff System Version 2 is a portable system that uses commercial off-the-shelf smart phones designed for use by dismounted Marines to locate targets, pinpoint global positioning coordinates and call for close air, artillery and naval fire support using secure digital communications. The upgraded system includes a laser range finder, video down link receiver and a combat net radio.

An upgrade to the current system, THS V.2 reduces the system’s total weight by half and includes more intuitive software.

Additive Manufacturing

In the last few years, the Marine Corps has continued its exploration of additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, to quickly repair and replace parts for weapons, vehicles and equipment.

The Corps uses additive manufacturing to reduce maintenance costs, increase equipment readiness and improve combat effectiveness. Additionally, it offers Marines opportunities to solve day-to-day and low-risk challenges, such as those encountered on aircraft, weapons, vehicles and communications equipment, by offering the capability to repair and replace individual parts onsite.

Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer III

The Indoor Simulated Marksmanship Trainer III has three added weapons, 3-D imagery, and enhanced training modes, giving Marines a better, more realistic training experience as they prepare for the complexities of modern warfare.

ISMT III ups the ante by providing wireless connectivity to the M9 service pistol, M4 carbine and adding three new wireless weapons—the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle, M32A1 Multi-Shot Grenade Launcher and M72 Light Anti-Tank Weapons. ISMT helps to build fundamentals of muscle memory for Marines so that when they hit the range, they are ready to respond to real-life scenarios.

Away from the exhibit floor, Brig. Gen. Joseph Shrader, commander, MCSC will participate in the “Accelerated Acquisition” panel April 11, to discuss Marine Corps initiatives to speed delivery of systems and equipment to the fleet.

As the systems command of the Marine Corps, MCSC equips Marine forces with ground weapon and information technology systems to accomplish their warfighting mission.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

US Marine Corps to Assess Boots at Parris Island

Saturday, March 31st, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

In an effort to continually improve the clothing and equipment Marines are issued, Marine Corps Systems Command will conduct an assessment to see if lighter boots can improve recruit performance. Plans are to compare two lighter boots to the Marine Corps Combat Boot during a recruit training cycle at Parris Island.

One boot, the Danner Reckoning Hot Weather Boot was authorized for optional wear by Marine Corps Systems Command in 2017.

“The feedback we’ve received from Marines on the Reckoning boots, is positive,” said Todd Towles, project officer for the Clothing and Equipment Team at Marine Corps Systems Command. “The boots are lightweight, durable, and there’s virtually no break-in period.”

Now, program officials plan to compare the Reckoning and another relative newcomer—the Rocky Tropical boot. The Rocky Tropical performed well in jungle environments during a 2017 user evaluation with 3rd Battalion 3rd Marines in Hawaii.

U.S. Marine Corps recruits of Bravo Company, 1st Recruit Training Battalion, march during a six-mile conditioning hike on Parris Island, South Carolina. In an effort to continually improve the clothing and equipment Marines are issued, Marine Corps Systems Command will conduct an assessment to see if lighter boots can improve recruit performance. Plans are to compare two lighter boots to the Marine Corps Combat Boot during a recruit training cycle at Parris Island. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Joseph Jacob)

The program office will issue 700 Reckoning boots and 700 Rocky Tropical boots to male and female recruits. Half of the Danner and half of the Rocky will go to a male company and remaining boots will be issued to a female company.

The purpose of the assessment is to do a comparison between the Rocky and Reckoning and the Marine Corps Combat Boot to see if there is a decrease in lower extremity injuries.

The MCCB has been in the Corps’ inventory since 2001 and is a seabag issue item.

The three-month assessment is planned to take place this summer, Towles said.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

SSD Note:

This is the Danner Reckoning.

This is the Rocky Jungle Boot.

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USMC Plans To Replace Newly Fielded Glocks With Modular Handgun System

Monday, March 19th, 2018

According to the Department of the Navy’s recently published DoD Fiscal Year 2019 Budget Estimates for Marine Corps Procurement, the service plans to spend $6.3 million in 2019 to purchase 35,000 Modular Handgun Systems.

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Way down in the notes on page 105 of this document, is the following statement:

The Modular Handgun System will be purchased to replace the legacy M9, M9A1, M45A1, and M007 pistols with a more affordable and efficient pistol for maintenance. The MHS also provides modularity and greater shooter ergonomics over the current models which will allow for more accurate fire for military personnel of different sizes. (Emphasis added)

SIG SAUER won the Modular Handgun System competition in January 2017 and since then has been delivering weapons which consist of a pistol, configurable as the full-size M17 or the compact M18, along with several new cartridges, including Ball and Special Purpose ammunition.

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Just last year, the Marine Corps adopted the FBI’s Glock 19M as the M007, a tongue-in-cheek nomenclature if there ever was one. But this purchase for their Criminal Investigation Division members, seems short-lived.

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Granted, this doesn’t mean that all Glocks in the Marine Corps will be replaced, just the M007s. MARSOC will keep their SOCOM-issued G19s. However, this move will most likely also affect the M007s requested under UONS to 2nd MARDIV.

To be sure, there are plenty of other gems in this document, like money allocated for additional M27 IARs as well as fielding CSASS and the M320 Grenade Launcher, but that the Marine Corps is announcing the replacement of the M007 so quickly is worth singling out.

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The Glocks won’t be the only things to go. Naturally, the Beretta M9 and M9A1 pistols are slated to be removed from service, since was the goal of the program all along. But even the 1911-derived M45A1 CQB pistols produced by Colt for the Reconnaissance community will be replaced as well.

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For those of you who think this is a new development, it’s really not. The Marine Corps is a participant in the MHS program and has been open about their plans to adopt MHS. Interestingly, when this slide was briefed at last year’s NDIA Armaments Conference in May, the M007 pistol hadn’t even been announced yet.

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Just a few years ago, the Marine Corps scrubbed most of the handguns from their unit-level Tables of Organization and Equipment. That 35,000 number for MHS may represent the vast majority of their service-wide buy. But that’s the way the Marines like to handle their procurements; swiftly.

United States Marine Corps Selects Leupold TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T for M38, Squad-Designated “Marksman Rifle”

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018

BEAVERTON, Ore. — The United States Marine Corps is in the process of fielding the M38, which features a Leupold TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T riflescope atop an M27. The configuration is to be known as the Squad-Designated Marksman Rifle. The TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T has previously been fielded with the Mk 12 Special Purpose Rifle.

“We pride ourselves on building optics that deliver elite optical performance and unparalleled reliability,” Bruce Pettet, president and chief executive officer for Leupold & Stevens, Inc., said. “We’re ecstatic that the Marine Corps selected the TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T. The men and women of the U.S. armed forces deserve the very best, and we’re proud to deliver it.”

The TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T, which features a 2.5-8x36mm design, was designed with mid-range applications in mind, and has easy-to-adjust tactical turrets and range estimating reticles. A 30mm maintube provides greater strength and light transmission. As with all Leupold riflescopes, the optic is waterproof, fog proof, and shockproof.

“The TS-30A2 Mark 4 is the perfect optic for those looking to deliver fast, precise rifle fire,” said Sam Horstman, director of military sales for Leupold & Stevens, Inc. “Further, like all Leupold optics, it’s been strenuously tested for durability, and fully meets the rugged standards set by the Marine Corps.”

For more information on Leupold® products, please visit us at Leupold.com.

Join the discussion on Facebook, Facebook.com/LeupoldOptics, on Twitter at Twitter.com/LeupoldOptics or on Instagram at Instagram.com/LeupoldOptics.

No, The Marines Haven’t Issued A Contract For Additional M27s

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018

I keep getting asked if the USMC has let a contract for additional M27 Infantry Automatic Rifles. Apparently, a few weeks ago a gun blog called Guns America reported that the Marine Corps had awarded Heckler & Koch a contract for additional M27s. The problem is, it’s untrue.

The author’s reasoning was that the “protest period” was over and consequently, a contract had been let. Once again, this isn’t true. For some reason, H&K representative Bill Dermody agreed with the interviewer during a video taken during SHOT Show by Guns America, giving further credence to the story.

Last Summer, Marine Corps Systems Command issued a pre-solicitation intent to solicit and negotiate with Heckler & Koch (H&K), for up to 50,814 M27 Infantry Automatice Rifles (IAR)Since then, they’ve publicly said and done nothing. There hasn’t been a “protest period” because there hasn’t been a contract award issued by the Marines.

Unfortunately, other websites who didn’t know what they were talking about, picked up the story and shared it.

Sure, the Marine Corps is interested in purchasing additional M27s to outfit their Infantry Forces and H&K would love the business, but the reality is that it hasn’t happened. At least, yet. The Commandant of the Marine Corps has publicly stated his desire to do so and I know the Marines are working toward that end, but they’ve still got some things to work out.

I promise you; as soon as I can tell you it has happened, I will.

USMC Plate Carrier Gen III

Wednesday, February 14th, 2018

The Marine Corps developed this Gen III design for their Plate Carrier and is currently working through the wickets to get it into production.

Look for lots of new equipment for the Marine Infantryman in the near future.

Marine Corps makes history with mine plow prototype for Assault Breacher Vehicle

Saturday, February 10th, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

The Marine Corps’ Assault Breacher Vehicle made history last year when it conducted its first amphibious landing with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during a long-range breaching exercise in the western United States.

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, prepare to load an Assault Breacher Vehicle onto a Landing Craft Utility at Camp Pendleton, California. All vehicles were loaded onto LCUs then transported to the USS Rushmore to conduct the first amphibious landing in an ABV with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

In December 2017, Marine Corps Systems Command used Exercise Steel Knight as an opportunity to test the Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype for the first time. Steel Knight is a division-level exercise designed to enhance command and control, and interoperability with the 1st Marine Division, its adjacent units and naval support forces.

In the future, this piece of equipment will make it easier for Marines to land and deploy an ABV from a Navy Landing Craft Utility boat to the shore to complete their mission.

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Lance Cpl. Rhita Daniel)

“Our legacy Full Width Mine Plow on the ABV could not fit onto an LCU because it was too wide,” said Timothy Barrons, ABV project officer for Engineer Systems at Marine Corps Systems Command. “The prototype we are testing fills a current capability gap and gives commanders the flexibility to use multiple surface connectors to get ABVs in the fight.”

The modified plow prototype is not only easier to transport, but safer to use, Barrons said. Once the LCU drops the bow ramp onto land, Marines can drive the ABV off the boat, open the plow and breach the area to ensure they eliminate any unsafe obstacles.

“The Assault Breacher Vehicle is the premiere breaching tool in the Marine Corps, and there is no other tool like it,” said Alvin “Tommy” West, ABV platform engineer. “It can carry two Linear Demolition Charges (commonly referred to as the line charge) on the back with over a thousand pounds of C4 explosives in each of the charge. A rocket is attached to each line charge to propel the charge, which is critical when clearing a path through mine fields.”

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U.S. Marines from 1st Combat Engineer Battalion, 1st Marine Division, conduct the first amphibious landing in an Assault Breacher Vehicle with a Modified Full Width Mine Plow prototype during Exercise Steel Knight on the west coast. Marine Corps Systems Command tested the prototype which will make it easier to transport the ABV from ship to shore. (Courtesy photo)

After the line charge detonates, landmines in its path are destroyed or rendered ineffective. Marines use the mine plow to sift through the mine field and push any remaining landmines off to the side, leaving a safe path for the assault force.

“This plow prototype makes the ABV transportable and gives the commander options to accomplish his tasks on the battlefield,” said Barrons. “The capability makes the force more lethal because it helps keep other combat vehicles intact and saves the lives of Marines.”

The ABV Program Team plans to take the information and feedback from Marines gathered at Steel Knight to refine the design and improve the overall performance of the modified plow. The team wants to ensure the modified plow will meet all requirements of the legacy mine plow in performance and survivability. After the redesign is completed, the articles will be tested at the U.S. Army Aberdeen Test Center in Maryland.

“Because the plow is foldable and deals directly with explosives, it is going to take some hits, so we need to ensure it is more reliable than the legacy mine plow which was not hinged or foldable,” said West. “There is no other piece of gear in the Marine Corps that does what the ABV with the Full Width Mine Plow does. Our goal is to make the new plow even more reliable and easier to maintain.”
The ABV Program is a part of Engineer Systems under the Logistics Combat Element Systems program at Marine Corps Systems Command.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

Program Office Begins Fielding Upgraded LAV Anti-Tank Weapon System to Marines

Wednesday, November 22nd, 2017

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. — The Corps is upgrading the turret system on one of its longest-serving fighting vehicles–the Light Armored Vehicle-Anti-Tank.


A Light Armored Vehicle Anti-Tank Modernization A2 model sits under an awning aboard Marine Corps Logistics Base Barstow, Calif., June 15. Marine Corps Systems Command’s LAV-Anti-Tank Modernization program team completed its first fielding of four upgraded ATWS in September. (U.S. Marine Corps Photo by Keith Hayes)

In September, Marine Corps Systems Command’s LAV-AT Modernization program team achieved initial operational capability by completing its first fielding of four upgraded Anti-Tank Weapon Systems to 1st Light Armored Reconnaissance Battalion Marines at Camp Pendleton, California.

The ATWS fires tube-launched, optically-tracked, wire-guided, or TOW, missiles. It provides long-range, stand-off anti-armor fire support to maneuvering Light Armored Reconnaissance Companies and platoons, and observation capability in all climates and during periods of limited visibility.

The LAV-ATM program was established in 2012 to enhance the reliability, availability and maintainability of the vehicle’s turret system.

The team’s goal was to get a new turret system on the LAV-AT platform that was easy to maintain, reliable and effective, said Jim Forkin, Program Manager’s Office LAV-ATM team lead.

“Compared to the legacy version, the new turret is unmanned, it fires both wire-guided and radio frequency TOW missiles, and it can acquire targets while on-the-move with an improved thermal sight,” said Forkin.

It also has a Far Target Location system, new commander/gunner video sight displays, and an electric elevation and azimuth drive system, which helps rotate the weapon system onto the target.

“The turret is important because it protects Marines and gives them an enhanced capability that they didn’t have before,” said Chief Warrant Officer 4 Michael S. Lovell, Ordinance Vehicle Maintenance officer, PM LAV team. “The new turret on the LAV-AT helps us watch over other vehicles and target enemies with increased vision.”

The LAV-ATM team provides new equipment training to units receiving the ATWS upgrade. It lasts for two weeks, and the first week is focused on operators and the second week is on maintainer training. Continued training on the system can be conducted by the units using the embedded training mode.

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A Marine tests the enhanced vision capability–part of an upgrade to the Light Armored Vehicle’s Anti-Tank Weapon System–during new equipment training Sept. 18-29, at Camp Pendleton, Calif. Marine Corps Systems Command completed its first fielding of four upgraded ATWS in September. (Courtesy photo)

Thanks to advances in technology, Marines can initiate a built-in test to conduct a system check of the components that make up the ATWS to help the operator and maintainer diagnose and troubleshoot the system, a feature not previously available on the legacy turret, said Forkin.

The operator can also use an embedded training mode in the ATWS, which is software driven, to support individual and crew training by simulating the firing of the weapon system while viewing targets through the biocular display unit.

“This function is new to the LAV-ATM platform and will enhance sustainment training while in garrison or the field without wasting resources,” said Forkin. “With new technological advances, the overall design and functionality has improved.”

In addition to training in the field, anti-tank gunners and maintainers also train in a classroom setting environment with stations using existing 3D computer simulated technology leveraged by the U.S. Army to train their maintainers. This modernizes how the Corps trains its maintainers to meet the requirements to sustain the new ATWS.

By incorporating a blended training solution, all four existing Tactical Turret Trainers are upgraded with the ATWS and a 3D Diagnostic Turret Trainer, or DTT, is added. The DTT consists of two classrooms with eight student stations and one instructor station each. The Corps’ 3D DTT maintenance training system is unique to the ATWS and will be fielded in November.

“Using the 3D DTT, students will interactively conduct troubleshooting and remove and replace ATWS components in a simulated environment, which will be followed by training on actual hardware on the Tactical Turret Trainer and vehicles,” said Paul Kopjoe, Logistics Management specialist, PM LAV team at Program Manager’s Office LAV.

With a combination of an interactive 3D DTT, which allows the instructor to train multiple students at the same time, the ATWS Tactical Turret Trainer provides the student with the tactile feel of a real ATWS system. Benefits of DTT by other programs include the reduction in student attrition rates and the ability for maintenance tasks to be repeated numerous times, without risk of injury or wear and tear on equipment.

The U.S. Army Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC, is the overarching Army agency used to acquire and develop the 3D DTT training products. The Gaming Interactive Technologies & Multimedia and the Automated Test Systems Directorate are the primary organizations within ARDEC that completed the majority of the work to help make this happen, Kopjoe said.

“Traditionally, training products are procured utilizing industry which can take 18-24 months just to get effort on contract,” said Kopjoe. “We were able to eliminate that time by utilizing existing Army resources, so that our Marines would be properly trained when the ATWS was fielded. This also allowed the ATM Team to meet the training needs of the USMC Ordnance School located at Fort Lee, Virginia.”

Fielding for the ATWS will be completed at the end of 2019.

“Marines who serve as anti-tank gunners will be able to do their job better,” said Lovell. “We’re providing a product that gives Marines an enhanced anti-tank capability improving their forward reconnaissance and combined arms fire power on the battlefield.”

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command