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Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

UF Pro Presents : The Pro’s Guide To Tactical Shooting

Friday, March 16th, 2018

This video covers DRILL No. 1: Protect VIP in a Vehicle.

In this scenario, a car carrying a VIP and 3 bodyguards is frontally attacked. The driver is KIA and the car rolls along uncontrolled until it comes to a stop, leaving the 2 surviving bodyguards no choice but to evacuate the VIP and protect him until support arrives. Learn how to shoot behind cover while protecting a VIP.

ufpro.com/tactical_shooting

Redback One – Active Shooter Awareness Seminar

Thursday, March 15th, 2018

Redback One Active Shooter Awareness Seminar
Presented by Jason Falla
When: March 24, 2018
Time: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Where: Aloft Hotel, Crossways Blvd. Chesapeake (may change to Colonial Shooting Academy)
Cost: $85

Registration: www.redbackone.com or email info@redbackone.com

What To Do During An In Progress Active Shooter Crisis

As active shooter situations are generally over within 5-15 minutes and often before the arrival of law enforcement officers, individuals must be prepared both physically and mentally to deal with an in progress active shooter situation.

Active shooter incidents are unpredictable and generally evolve quickly: Typically, the immediate deployment of law enforcement is required to stop the shooting and

mitigate the threat. However, many active shooter situations have been stopped by armed citizens or those that are prepared to intervene to stop the threat.

SEMINAR COVERS THE FOLLOWING TOPICS

• Response procedures following our ESCAPE methodology.

• Mindset and mental toughness.

• Profile of an active shooter.

• Fear response and dealing with combat stress.

• Human combative behaviors and rapid threat recognition.

• Responsibilities of managers and staff during an active

shooter crisis.

• What to do when the shooter is in your vicinity.

• Room hardening procedures and how to barricade.

• Procedures to disrupt or incapacitate the shooter.

• How to respond when Law Enforcement and first responders arrive.

• Evacuation procedures and what you can do to assist.

• Casualty care and life saving techniques.

WHAT IS AN ACTIVE SHOOTER?

The National Tactical Officer’s Association (NTOA) defines active shooter as… “one or more subjects who participate in a random or systematic shooting spree, demonstrating their intent to continuously harm others. An active shooter’s overriding objective appears to be that of mass murder, rather than criminal conduct such as robbery kidnapping, etc.”

DON’T BE A VICTIM

This seminar explains in detail the appropriate response protocol that should be used during an in progress active shooter crisis in the workplace.

Announcing The Creation Of The Firearms Trainers Association

Saturday, March 10th, 2018

The state of firearms training in the United States is a mess and does not further the interests of law abiding firearms enthusiasts. Perception of firearms enthusiasts is so crucial to our civil rights provided in the 2nd Amendment. However, the unregulated internet world of posting videos and attempting to obtain celebrity through inappropriate tactics, ill founded curriculum, lack of safety and unprofessionalism highlights the need for creation of an organization that protects and professionalizes the profession of Firearms Trainers, in an apolitical way.

Therefore, we are proud to announce the formation of the Firearms Trainers Association, www.FTAProtect.com. The FTA is an organization founded by 5 of the most well respected and distinguished professional firearms trainers in the world. Ken Hackathorn-Chairman, Larry Vickers-Vice Chairman, and Board members Jeff Gonzales, Dave Spaulding and Scott Reidy have worked with 2A Association Management and Executive Director Kyle Sweet, to create for the first time, an organization delivering national standards for firearms trainers, protecting the profession of firearms training through standards, insurance (professional liability and property and casualty), business development services, curriculum certification, safety and risk management. The Board members have decades of training experience in military and law enforcement and have dedicated their professional lives to training all levels of civilians. Their recognition of the need to create a mechanism to serve the interests of firearms trainers as well as increase the professionalism of the profession through their experiences, resources and core values lead them to create FTA.

Firearms Trainers Association will provide content that has been vetted, is reliable and trustworthy in addition to being tactically sound. FTA, operating with the the hashtag #ProtectingtheProfession will provide three levels of membership to firearms trainers based on the extent of their teaching and career in the industry. FTA will serve as the industry leader in providing professional development to trainers through resources, networking, marketing assistance (including joint marketing initiatives), web content consulting, video safety briefings from Board Members, and legal forms for Waivers of Liability, and other business related forms as well as use of the FTA logo in marketing and training materials. A comprehensive suite of insurance services are provided with each membership. Certificates of Insurance are available to all members when needing them for conducting classes. Insurance is provided to the FTA through 2A Insurance, a Captive Insurance company reinsured through Port Royal Captive Re-Insurance. FTA has established for it’s members the only stable insurance in the firearms industry available to trainers. This insurance is not subject to political changes, protest or tragic event. It exists for the purpose of protecting the interests of it’s firearms associations.

Level 1: Instructor: this level is for members who teach an occasional class such as Self Defense Act courses to license individuals for a concealed carry permit. NRA basic instructors who teach occasionally.

Level 2: Teacher: This level is for those teaching classes regularly, has had more advanced training themselves and possesses more advanced certifications. Someone who teaches classes beyond mere concealed carry classes, such as tactics, but does not do this for a living.

Level 3: Professional: someone with significant advanced training from military, law enforcement or significant civilian firearms training who is a firearms trainer for a living. The Professional level of membership will require peer reviewed acceptance by the 5 Founders.

All memberships are priced at $400. Payment online is available at www.FTAProtect.com For those who are not trainers and do not need the insurance for a trainer but want access to the content, and support the mission to create standards for trainers and training, an auxiliary membership is available for $100 per year. Support Members will have access to all content and information of all levels of membership.

For more information or access to Board members for media inquiries and interviews please contact Kyle Sweet at 405-684-0900 or e-mail info@FTAProtect.com

Enforce Tac 18 – Ase Utra

Thursday, March 8th, 2018

Finnish suppressor manufacturer Ase Utra displayed their new training suppressor. It’s a Denny device and can be used for non-blank firing training such as combatives or non-firing rehearsals. This sample has been painted but they are working on a Cerakote version.

If you need a blank firing device, Ase Utra offers this model from their partner Thales which was developed for use with the Austeyr and has been adapted to their muzzle attachment.

132d Wing Members Enhance Deployment Readiness at Sentry Aloha

Monday, March 5th, 2018

I’m sharing this story by the Iowa Air National Guard’s 132nd Wing PAO for two reasons:

1. My father was a full time Guard guy (technician) at the 132nd Fighter Wing while I was growing up, so I have a personal interest.

2. The Wing has given up its F-16s and now conducts ISR, as a ground control station for UAS. When they had fighters, it made sense for the Wing to deploy to other locales, in order to familiarize themselves with the operating environment and practice wartime tasks. Now that they don’t have airplanes, it’s interesting to see the Wing’s personnel still conduct exercises at other bases.

Des Moines, Iowa —

Hawaii. A beautiful island paradise full of scenic ocean and mountain views, pleasant tropical breezes and piña coladas. What the members of the 132d Wing were preparing for though is anything but pleasant. Throughout the beautiful island, gas masks were being donned, weapons readied, sleeves rolled up, boots muddied and sweat falling as Iowa Air Guardsmen prepared themselves and others for hazardous and deadly situations.


Master Sgt. Patrick Kazeze, 132d Communications Flight, takes inventory of computer equipment February 13, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d CF Airmen inventoryed equipment, disposed of outdated computer hardrives and performed maintenance on underground network cables. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

Approximately 69 Airmen of the 132d Wing deployed to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii, February 10-23, 2018 for Exercise Sentry Aloha to develop their deployment readiness skills alongside their active duty and Hawaii Air National Guard counterparts.

Airmen from civil engineering, emergency management, fire emergency services, communications, security forces, force support squadron and medical all trained in a variety of environments and scenarios with local active duty and guard members.


Master Sgt. Matt Henning, 132d Wing Command Support Staff, acts as a casualty during an active shooter drill at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The drill was conducted to measure the response time and readiness of emergency personnel. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

The Emergency Management (EM) team trained approximately 466 active duty, Guard, and Reservist Airmen in Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear (CBRN) attack survival skills. The training included proper use of CBRN equipment, simulation of different disaster scenarios, decontamination training and self-aid and buddy care (SABC).

“Getting to see the different perspective each instructor brings really helps pinpoint better ways to help people survive, especially those deploying,” said Tech. Sgt. Rachel Albee, 132d Wing Emergency Management.

Tech. Sgt. Rachel Albee, 132d Wing Emergency Managment, instructs Hawaii Airmen in proper decontamination tactics February 13, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d EM trained approximately 466 active duty, Guard and Reserve Airmen. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)
Tech. Sgt. Rachel Albee, 132d Wing Emergency Managment, instructs Hawaii Airmen in proper decontamination tactics February 13, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d EM trained approximately 466 active duty, Guard and Reserve Airmen. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

EM had access to equipment and facilities unavailable their home station which allowed them to effectively train Airmen for disaster scenarios. The efforts of EM were instrumental in deployment readiness of the Hawaii Airmen and were greatly appreciated.

“They integrated well with our flight members and provided much needed support in the readiness surge getting Airmen deployment ready,” said MSgt. Kareem Fuertes, emergency manager, 154th Wing, Hawaii Air National Guard.


Master Sgt. Randy Warden, a combat arms training and maintenance (CATM) instructor, 132d Security Forces Squadron, gives instructions to shooters February 14, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The CATM team oversaw the weapons training and qualification for deploying Hawaii Airmen. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

Instructors from the 132d Security Forces Squadron’s combat arms training and maintenance (CATM) team oversaw the weapons training and qualification for deploying Hawaii Airmen. The training was conducted in new, state of the art indoor range which allowed for a greater diversity of shooting scenarios and allowed for faster qualification time.


Hawaii Air National Guard Airmen fire M-4 carbines during weapons qualification February 14, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor- Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii.The 132d Security Forces CATM team oversaw the weapons training and qualification for deploying Hawaii Airmen. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

“It was great being able to see how it works and talk to the CATM group here to find out the pros, cons and all the maintenance that is needed if we were able to obtain one,” said Tech. Sgt. Savannah Page, CATM instructor, 132d SFS.

The 132d Medical Group trained on administrative systems and also worked real world medical operations at Tripler Army Hospital in Honolulu, Hawaii. The training included a rare hands-on Aerovac training mission, the on and off loading of patients in critical condition from aircraft. The training, which most ANG members seldom receive except in deployed locations, presented many challenges which the 132d MDG used to prepare themselves for future missions.

“The biggest obstacle for the training is the unpredictability of the actual flights,” said Staff Sgt. Kelsey Searls. “Aircraft availability, stability of the patients, weather, paperwork; all of it can change the flight times at any moment, making training on actual aircraft and running live missions, sometimes impossible to get during an annual training tour.”

132d Communications Flight Airman from the 132d Wing, Iowa Air National Guard open up a manhole cover while working on underground cables February 22, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d CF Airmen inventoryed equipment, disposed of outdated computer hardrives and performed maintenance on underground network cables. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)
132d Communications Flight Airman from the 132d Wing, Iowa Air National Guard open up a manhole cover while working on underground cables February 22, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d CF Airmen inventoryed equipment, disposed of outdated computer hardrives and performed maintenance on underground network cables. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

132d Communications Flight worked on a variety of projects on base including inventorying equipment, disposing outdated computer hard drives and tapes as well as prepare underground network cables for use in base operations. They also upgraded the base’s computer systems and software.

“It was great getting to work with new people in a total force integrated environment,” said Senior Airman Ben Trotter, spectrum operations technician, 132d Communications Flight. “We provided manpower which organized their assets as well as training for us which will make us a more efficient communications flight.”

Communications Flight Airmen disposed of over 200 computer hard drives, inventoried and processed in approximately 250 computers, updated the software on 40 computers and fixed approximately five thousand feet of network cable.


Staff Sgt. Megan Newton, services, 132d Force Support Squadron, makes a pie in the Hale Aina Dining Facility, February 14, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The 132d FSS Airmen provided five thousand meals for base members. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly)

The 132d Force Support Squadron’s services Airmen provided meals at the Hale Aina Dining Facility on Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam. The Airmen were able take inventory of the produce and supplies of the dining facility which helped them gain more knowledge of accountability systems.

“Working hand in hand with the active duty was rewarding as was the mutual exchange of ideas and knowledge of the services field which will make our shop better,” Chris Newton, services shift leader, 132d FSS.

The services Airmen also helped prepare a special meal for the base in honor of Black History Month. In total, the 132d FSS served approximately five thousand meals to active duty, Guard and Reserve Airmen. They also conducted the physical training tests of approximately 500 Airmen.


U.S. Navy and Air Force security forces rush towards the scene of a shooting during an active shooter drill February 15, 2018, at Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam in Honolulu, Hawaii. The drill was conducted to measure the response time and readiness of emergency personnel. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Senior Master Sgt. Robert Shepherd)

Sentry Aloha exercises are held to provide the Air National Guard, U.S. Air Force and other Department of Defense agencies an opportunity to execute current, realistic, integrated training specifically designed to develop combat operations and skill sets.

By Staff Sgt. Michael J. Kelly, 132d Wing Public Affairs

SureFire Field Notes Ep 21 – Handgun Red Dot Sights with John Spears

Saturday, March 3rd, 2018

In this episode, John Spears of Forge Tactical discusses many misconceptions of red dot sights on handguns.

John “Doc” Spears is a former 18 Delta Special Operations Medic and sniper who served in the 7th Special Forces Group (Airborne). He has worked in counter-insurgency/counter narco-terrorism and interdiction projects throughout Central and South America. He specializes in small unit tactics and sniper operations and is a master shoothouse instructor. He is a defense industry consultant and trainer for multiple manufacturers including many of the Forge Tactical sponsors. After leaving active duty and completing his education he returned to the defense and training industry and became a student of Pat Rogers. He subsequently became Pat’s assistant instructor and began teaching all advanced tactical courses with EAG in 2009. Chappy joined them soon after. Doc and Chappy formed Forge Tactical in 2017 after Pat’s death to continue the mission of training America’s armed protectors.

forgetactical.com

alliancepolicetraining.com

www.surefire.com

83rd ERQS Pararescuemen Conduct Weapons Training in Afghanistan

Tuesday, February 27th, 2018
U.S. Air Force Pararescuemen assigned to the 83rd Expeditionary Rescue Squadron, 455th Expeditionary Wing, Bagram Air Field, Afghanistan, conduct weapons training Feb. 21, 2018. Pararescuemen conduct training on all aspects of combat, medical procedures and search and rescue tactics to hone their skills, providing the highest level of tactical capabilities to combatant commanders. (U.S. Air Force Video by SrA Nathaniel Stout)

Greyhive Snapshot – Drew Estell

Saturday, February 24th, 2018

How Do You Scan and Identify Targets?

How do we properly scan? We’ve all the seen people on the range that keep their eyes in their sights and move their weapon from left to right as a habit. While it looks good and they are checking the block on performing this critical task, sometimes those people aren’t actually identifying anything and are setting themselves up for failure.

If you keep your eyes in your sight while scanning, you are limiting yourself to what is within that toilet paper tube sized housing. With some sights, this is even smaller. As much as we train to go into broad target focus with the sight in line with our eyes, having it there will inevitably pull you back into what’s only visible from that housing. On top of this, red dot is already on your target.

We put our sights on target thousands of times and pull the trigger. Do you think anything will be different when you have to discriminate between a threat and a non-threat? Your brain has been wired to see a red dot or sights on target and pull the trigger. How about when other good guys have a weapon like a police officer responding to a call? Give yourself the time and space necessary to properly identify those around you in an actual situation. By lowering the weapon slightly so that the sights are not immediately visible and on your target, you are creating the amount of time and space necessary for your brain to identify the target, and potentially tell your firing hand not to pull the trigger if needed. I would want that split second extra to determine if what was in the suspect’s hand was a cell phone, an unidentified person holding a badge, or the shape in the middle of the night was actually my wife who accidently tripped over my gym bag while she was checking on the kiddo. There’s a lot of situations that this could be important, I’m sure you can think of several and add it to the comments below.

A good rule of thumb with a rifle is to be able to turn your chin over your buttstock. With a pistol, lower the gun down to your upper chest or break it back enough to be able to see the torso area of those around you. Hands aren’t always above the shoulder line to determine if they have a gun, and badges aren’t always high on the chest to easily see. When you have your weapon pressed out in your line of sight, you are effectively cutting off the majority or the torso that gives us the ability to identify what we need, get a snapshot of the person, and proceed into our “snapshot… hands, aim, shoot” process of target identification.

Scan with your eyes and actually identify the targets to your left and right of your area. ID target, engage until target begins to go down, gun down, eyes lead gun, and snap onto next target if required. Use your eyes to gather information and determine whether or not you will give commands or engage depending on your situation. You can only shoot as fast as you can see, and you can only make decision as fast as you can process information. Don’t limit yourself on either, or set yourself up for failure.

thumbnail Drew Estell is the owner of BAER Solutions, and served for a decade in Special Operations. He has been fortunate enough to serve with soldiers and instructors who were invested in his success, and as such have benefited from the years of experience that each of them had. During the course of his multiple combat deployments and experiences, he has learned that no shooter is the same.

In addition to weapons training classes, BAER Solutions offers leadership and team building consultations. BAER Solutions also works with police departments to take lessons learned from SOF deployments and apply them to the specific needs of the local governance and populace. By combining SOF tenets of Village Stability Operations and the concept of Community Policing, they deliver a consulting and training package called Unconventional Policing.

For more information this topic, create your free account at Greyhive and subscribe to our YouTube channel to watch the pistol ready position videos demonstrating this.

Snapshot is a bi-weekly series from Greyhive featuring content written by our Experts. It is our goal to deliver information that prompts you to examine your preparedness from all angles, not just how quickly and accurately you shoot.