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AK Operator -The Modern Guide To A Legendary Rifle

Tuesday, April 14th, 2015

20150319084611-AK_Operator_-__iga_4K_-_DVD___BluRay

Slovenia-based Polenar Tactical has put up a funding campaign on Indiegogo to produce a series of AK training videos. Dubbed ‘AK Operator – The Modern Guide to a Legendary Rifle’, the video series will offer an in-depth overview of the AK platform, including its operation and shooting technique.

www.indiegogo.com/projects/ak-operator-the-modern-guide-to-a-legendary-rifle

Pat McNamara Burns It Down – Rope and Truck Drill

Monday, April 6th, 2015

Just in case you ate a little too much during Easter, Pat McNamara has got just the drill for you.

The Jungle Operations Training Center at Ft Sherman Panama

Wednesday, April 1st, 2015

A little trip down memory lane for those of you who attended JOTC while it was still located in Panama.

Drop The Crackpipe And Take Off The Tinfoil Hat – Jade Helm 15 Really Is, Just An Exercise

Monday, March 30th, 2015

Last week, the internet was aflame with conspiracy theories regarding Exercise Jade Helm 15, a multi-week Unconventional Warfare exercise involving about 1200 SOF personnel, set to take place across the southern half of the United States starting this July. Apparently, someone released a slide deck with an overview of the exercise, to the blogosphere. The next thing you know, the conspiracy industry had some new material to twist into a Martial Law narrative that got the moonbat crowd all worked up.

Declare martial law with 1200 troops (including support guys)? Really?

Off course, it’s another case of 1 + 1 = C. First off, we’ve got an official statememt. Here’s the gist:

When asked by the press about Exercise Jade Helm 15, USASOC spokesman LTC Mark Lastoria answered, “It’s a training exercise. Just a regular training exercise.”

Next, we can look at the slides themselves. The cover slide is straight forward and it was obviously presented to a local government to explain what is going on in an effort get permission to train in their area.


They aren’t exactly hiding the nature of the exercise or where it will take place.
 The slides are very up front about the nature of the training as it concerns local citizens.

Next, the slides detail the types of units involved. Not something you’d run around telling folks if you had a secret plan afoot.

As you can see, it’s a rather large training area but there’s a simple explanantion. It allows the units participating to actually deal with the tyranny of distance which effects transportation and communications as well as command and control. Even SOF portions of Combat Training Center rotations involve long distances between elements and target areas and those are conducted regularly.

As an aside, I really dig the logo which depicts crossed arrows and dagger (synonymous with Special Forces) set behind a French wooden shoe called a sabot. That wooden clog is where the term “sabotage” comes from. During the French revolution, workers were said to throw these shoes into the works of looms in order to break them. Unconventional Warfare and sabotage go together like peas and carrots.

The truth of the matter is that these exercises are nothing new and have been occuring for well over 50 years. Over the course of my 21 year long career, I participated in numerous large-scale, multi-week, joint SOF exercises with training areas that spanned multiple states. They were (and remain) excellent opportunities to practice the conduct of successful operations and such frequent exercises are what honed SOF capabilities, so ably demonstrated in the opening weeks of Operation Enduring Freedom, some 14 years ago.

If you still don’t believe me, I’ll once again share the period documentary, “Guerilla: USA” which depicts an early 1960s Unconventional Warfare exercise conducted by Special Forces in West Virginia. Equipment and TTPs may change but the underlying mission of working with the locals remains an inherent tenet of UW.

None of this is nefarious, and the activities in the documentary are more intricate than will take place in Jade Helm 15. Jade Helm isn’t a threat to liberty, but rather part of a larger mechanism deigned to protect it. So sleep peacefully in your beds at night knowing that rough men stand ready to do violence on your behalf. And, drop that crack pipe.

Al Clark Is Partnering With Colonial Shooting Academy In New Training Venture

Friday, March 27th, 2015

colonial tactical

Colonial Shooting Academy has announced a partnership with Al Clark, former Navy SEAL and co-founder of Blackwater Lodge and Training Center. The new training venture, dubbed Colonial Tactical, will offer shooters a wide range of practical and effective firearms training, fueled by Al Clark’s 28 years of Military and professional training experience.

For more information, visit www.colonialshooting.com/vab/event-type/dynamic-shooting-course

MARSOC Advanced Sniper Training

Friday, March 27th, 2015

I’ve been to this training site before. Jim Smith’s Spartan Tactical is an excellent facility made for precision marksmanship.

Emergency & Disaster Management Now Available from Panteao

Thursday, March 26th, 2015

Columbia, SC, March 25, 2015 – Panteao Productions is happy to announce the release of the next video title in the new Make Ready to Survive instructional video series.

Emergency & Disaster Management is now available streaming to Panteao subscribers. The DVD versions will begin shipping next week.

The instructors in the series include former US Army Delta Operator Paul Howe, Dave Canterbury from the Pathfinder Self Reliance School, US Army Special Forces Green Beret Kyle Harth, disaster preparedness consultant and author Jim Cobb, and NE MacDougald, who started his career in Vietnam with the 519th Military Intelligence Bn (MACV), and today is an author and consultant.

Make Ready to Survive: Emergency & Disaster Management
Emergency & Disaster management addresses the types of events that you hope to never face but very well may. Long term events like major damage by a natural or man-made disaster, terrorism, and economic collapse are the things you see portrayed on television reality shows. But the reality is things do happen and whether you like it or not, you have to be prepared for them in a realistic manner. Instructors Paul Howe, Dave Canterbury, Jim Cobb, Kyle Harth, and N.E. MacDougald walk you through the planning & traveling by alternative routes, rehearsing your plan, living off the grid, alternative location caches, bugging out or not, the one year survival plan and budget, long term water sourcing, post-collapse barter and trade, home defense and firearm selection, specific disaster scenario planning, and more. Be prepared for the worst case scenario and all other events can be managed easier.

A total of 13 videos have been filmed in the Make Ready to Survive series. More info on the series can be found on the Panteao website at: panteao.com/survive

Panteao

Product Page for Make Ready to Survive: Emergency & Disaster Management panteao.com/product/make-ready-to-survive-emergency-disaster

Army Curtails M855A1 & M80A1 Ammo Use In Live Fire Shoot Houses

Friday, March 20th, 2015

Early this year, the US Army released guidance curtailing the use of M855A1 and M80A1 enhanced performance ammunition in live fire shoot houses until further notice due to over penetration of ballistic backer materials in the structures.

R 061517Z JAN 15
FM ALARACT RELEASE AUTHORITY WASHINGTON DC
TO ALARACT
BT
UNCLAS
SUBJ/URGENT ALARACT 004/2014 – STOP USE OF M855A1 AND M80A1 EPR AMMUNITION FOR TRAINING IN LIVE FIRE SHOOT HOUSES (LFSH) UNTIL TESTING IS COMPLETED

THIS URGENT ALARACT MESSAGE HAS BEEN TRANSMITTED BY USAITA ON BEHALF OF HQDA ASO//DACS-FS//

1. (U) BACKGROUND. THE EPR 5.56MM M855A1 AND 7.62MM M80A1 ROUNDS BOTH HAVE INCREASED VELOCITY AND IMPROVED PENETRATION CAPABLIITIES OVER CURRENT STANDARD AMMUNITION (5.56 M855 AND 7.62MM M80). THERE ARE SAFETY RELATED CONCERNS THAT THESE NEW ROUNDS MAY POSSIBLY PENETRATE THE EXISTING MATERIALS THAT ARE USED IN CONSTRUCTION OF LFSH (SHOCK ABSORBENT CONCRETE, WALLS FILLED WITH PEA GRAVEL OR SAND, AND 3/8 INCH AND 1/2 INCH AR 500 STEEL).

2. (U) TESTING IS ONGOING TO IDENTIFY WHICH LFSH CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS WILL CONTAIN PROJECTILES. THE M855A1 AND M80A1 EPR AMMUNITION SHOULD NOT BE USED DURING TRAINING IN ANY LFSH UNTIL TESTING OF CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS IS COMPLETED AND ANALYZED.

3. (U) HQDA G-3/5/7 HAS AUTHORIZED THE FOLLOWING AMMUNITION FOR USE IN LFSH: LIVE BALL-M855, M80; SHORT RANGE TRAINING AMMUNITION (SRTA)-5.56MM M1037 BALL, M862 PLASTIC AND 7.62MM M973/M974 LINKED 4
BALL/1 TRACER; AND CLOSE COMBAT MISSION CAPABILITY KIT (CCMCK) FORCE-ON-FORCE LOW VELOCITY MARKING AMMUNITION.

4. (U) POC: Redacted by me.

5. (U) EXPIRATION DATE IS 22 APRIL 2015.

Frank Proctor On Guns, Gear, Training, And Competitive Shooting

Wednesday, March 18th, 2015

Folks, here are some of my thoughts in regards to guns, gear, manipulations, technique, etc. I’m a fan of gear that works better as long as it’s reliable. I don’t take anything to a match that I wouldn’t take to combat. I would and have set up my guns for combat the same as my competition guns. In the ratio of performance and reliability I find a good happy medium. Mine work better than stock and they always work, they have to. The same goes for any techniques or shooting methodology it must for combat or competition. There is a bunch of weak sauce out there in the statements that competition stuff will get you killed. I disagree, I was a Green Beret and deployed to Afghanistan and Iraq both before and after I got involved in competitive shooting and achieved the rank of Grand Master in USPSA (limited division).

In May 2007 I was the Primary Instructor for Combat Marksmanship for an entire Special Forces Group and trained with dudes from other SF groups and other DOD agencies. I shot my first pistol match in May 2007 and I found out there was a whole lot I didn’t know about shooting. It was very humbling to see what those competitive shooters could do with a pistol. I was not as good as they were and I wanted to be better than I was. I’m still not as good as I want to be. I worked on it and trained and competed as often as I could. I learned a lot from shooting with those guys and competing and being under that kind of stress. I did and still do take away may lessons that make me a better shooter and made me a better Green Beret. Outside of more efficient techniques, gear and manipulations( the stuff that most shooters incorrectly focus on) a HUGE take away is seeing faster and more aggressively. What you see and process and how fast and aggressive you can do it make the biggest difference. An easy translation of me was doing CQB after competing. I am much more aggressive with my vision as a result of competing and it pays huge dividends being able to receive visual information and process it faster. I encourage every person that carries a gun of a living or for self defense to go out an compete, find out if you are a stood at shooting under stress as you want to be. If you are as good as you want to be then quit competing. I wasn’t and am still not as good as I want to be. Also worth mentioning, I find it very easy to separate tactics and shooting.

The visual and mechanical efficiency that you will gain by becoming a successful competitive shooter will make the application of tactics easier when that time arrives. Here’s another factoid and probably will be painful. There are a lot of people that carry guns for a living or in self defense that don’t train to be better shooters or very rarely do so ( my hat is off the the dedicated exceptions, I respect your dedication to your trade and responsibility) On the other every competitive shooters trains to become better because they want to win or they wan to be better than they were yesterday. In my mind that should apply to also apply to the folks that carry guns with the possibility of having to use it in a life or death situation.

Now, let me talk about press checks and putting rifles on safe etc. When I attended the Special Forces Advanced Urban Combat Course (Shooting and CQB course for every Green Beret) It was taught as part of a deliberate load procedure to press check the gun to insure a round was in the chamber. I think that’s a pretty solid PCI (pre combat inspection) I do it and the dudes I went to war with do it. It doesn’t cost anything and I have real good warm fuzzy when I need the gun it’ll go boom. I’ve seen a bunch of dudes that don’t do it and I’ve also seen them step up to shoot with an unloaded gun. I’ve seen this a bunch with the non press checkers. Never seen it with a though that make the press check part of their gun handling habits. I press check my pistol usually after I shoot, this became a habit for me as an adaptation. I shot a Beretta a good bit and with big hands I would override the slide stop and not get slide lock. I started press checking the pistol and prevented that uncomfortable feeling of having an empty mag and empty chamber.

Now, let’s talk about something else that seems to get some “tactical” shooters fired up. Putting the rifle on safe during reloads and when transitioning from rifle to pistol. I live by a very simple rule in regards to safe manipulation of the rifle. If my eyes are not connected to the sights the rifle is on safe. To this date that method has not cost me anytime in an engagement or transition. Over the last 15 years I have had and AR-15 or M4 in my hands nearly everyday. It’s a habit and an easy one. Doesn’t cost any time and prevents any issues. Once again I do it and believe in it an so do my peers. If you aren’t into it that’s cool, but not if you are on a range with me. I think anyone with an open mind would agree. I also believe that if you carry an AR-15 or M4 for a living and putting he gun on safe is an issue for you, then you should train more to make it easy and I’ll be glad to help with that. If you think that putting the rifle on safe when you are not connected to the sights is silly, then I think you need to evaluate what happens on the pointy end of the rifle. It’s only a matter of time and exposure before people with unsafe gun handling skills have their life or someone else’s life changed in a negative way.

Well, that’s about all I have for now I’ll finish by saying I believe win everything I do and teach and I know it works because I have down it and seen it with my eyes and explored it. Not because someone said so or the book said or the forum said etc. Also for a recap on my opinions based on my experiences as a shooter both combat shooting and competition shooting. Shooting has been a part of my everyday life and a passion for the last 15 years. I’ve been a Green Beret since November 2003 and Grand Master Since January 2009. Thanks for reading and I hope to see y’all at a range someday and I wish you the best in your shooting!

-Frank Proctor

www.wayofthegun.us

2015 Best Ranger Competition Team Rosters

Tuesday, March 17th, 2015

The team rosters for the 2015 Best Ranger Comp have been posted.  

Good luck, gentlemen!