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Archive for the ‘Training’ Category

SureFire Field Notes Ep 34: Processor Speed, with John Chapman

Friday, October 5th, 2018

SureFire Field Notes is a multi-segment informational video series with tips and techniques from subject matter experts of all backgrounds. In this episode, John “Chappy” Chapman of Forge Tactical discusses processor speed.

Born and raised in the tony suburbs of Sacramento, California, John Chapman (Chappy) joined the Navy at 18.  After an enlistment served on the USS Memphis, Chappy returned home to Northern California and embarked on a law enforcement career while attending college. After 16 years of service spanning 4 agencies, with service in Patrol, SWAT, Investigations, Training and Administration, Chappy left full time Police service and began training police officers full time in 2008. A police firearms and tactics instructor since 1994, Chappy founded LMS Defense as a part time private venture in 2006; and with the help of an amazing team built LMS into a full time venture by 2008.  After serving in Iraq as security specialist, Chappy returned to LMS full time and spent the next 5 years servicing domestic and international police and government training requirements, and consulting SWAT teams in Procedural Issues and Equipment Acquisition.  In 2009, Chappy also became a part time adjunct instructor for EAG Tactical, working for his mentor and friend, Pat Rogers.  It was through Pat’s mentorship and guidance that Chappy developed his skills as a teacher to the level of becoming a BCM Gunfighter.

Best known as a SWAT and Night Vision Instructor, Chappy continues to teach, now exclusively for Forge Tactical.   He also maintains his police commission, and serves as an Auxiliary Police Officer with the Alliance, Ohio Police Department, where he serves as a SRT Team Leader.

Defoor Proformance Introduces Tactical Combat Casualty Care All Combatants and First Responders

Monday, October 1st, 2018

For the first time, Defoor Proformance has opened enrollment for their Tactical Combat Casualty Care All Combatants and First Responders course.

Course Description:

NAEMT (National Association of Emergency Medical Technicians) TCCC-AC is a one day course that was designed for first Responders in a tactical and non-tactical environment. The course focuses on the most common cause of preventable death and the three phases of care. Care Under Fire, Tactical Field Care and Evacuation. There will be a heavy emphasis on repetitive scenario training incorporating state of the art training simulators and an advanced hemorrhage lab. Every student that successfully passes the course will be awarded a certification from NAEMT. 

All instructors are 18D long course graduates with multiple combat deployments in the past 10 years serving as an operational medic with their assigned unit.

There are prerequisites for attendance and these course dates will fill quickly. Be sure to visit defoor-proformance-shooting.myshopify.com for full details.

Max Talk Monday – Buddy Pair Fire & Movement: Break Contact (Front)

Monday, October 1st, 2018

This is the seventh installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

The second instructional session in buddy pair fire and movement, this follows on from the previous ‘assault’ example and covers break contact (front), including a live fire demo. These buddy pair videos are a follow up to the ‘Why the Lone Wolf Operator will Die’  Max Talk Videos, designed to show the advantages of the correct application of fire and movement at the basic building-block of a two-man buddy pair.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. 

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical

Asymmetric Warfare Group – Operational Advisor Training Course Small Arms Block Of Instruction

Tuesday, September 25th, 2018

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Asymmetric Warfare Group members conduct multiple pistol and rifle drills form different firing positions to transitioning from rifle to pistol as part of the Operational Advisor Training Course (OATC) at Fort A.P. Hill, Va., Sept. 11-13, 2018. The drills they were conducting were designed to: Improve accuracy and efficiency under stressful situations while transitioning from a rifle to a pistol.

OATC is designed to train and prepare Operational Advisors (AOs) for the Group’s global mission to provide operational advisory support to U.S. Army Forces in order to rapidly transfer relevant observations and solutions to the tactical, and operational point of need, to prepare Army Commanders to defeat emerging asymmetric threats and enhance multi-domain effectiveness.

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Max Talk Monday – Buddy Pair Fire & Movement: Assault

Monday, September 24th, 2018

This is the sixth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

An instructional session buddy pair fire and movement (assault), including a live fire demo. This is a follow up to the ‘Why the Lone Wolf Operator will Die’  Max Talk Videos, designed to show the advantages of the correct application of fire and movement at the basic building-block of a two-man buddy pair. This video is followed in series by a buddy pair break contact demonstration.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. 

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical

SureFire Field Notes Ep. 33: Bad Guys Move with Aaron Barruga

Friday, September 14th, 2018


SureFire Field Notes is a multi-segment informational video series with tips and techniques from subject matter experts of all backgrounds. In this episode, Aaron Barruga of Guerrilla Approach discusses the importance of movement in vehicle tactics.

Aaron joined the military because of 9/11. Accepted into the 18 x-ray program, he was allowed to directly try out for Special Forces, where he eventually served for nine years. Deploying to Iraq, Afghanistan, and the Pacific Theater of Operations, Aaron trained and performed missions with foreign commandos, law enforcement, and militia fighters. He utilizes lessons learned from success, but also failure in designing his training courses for domestic law enforcement and civilians.

Air Force Shooters Get Schooled

Thursday, September 13th, 2018

SMOKY HILL AIR NATIONAL GUARD RANGE, Kan. — Teams of Airmen move in and out of cover while under fire. Less than 15 feet from the enemy, one of the Airman’s primary weapons jams. Without hesitation, in one fluid motion, he slings his rifle, draws his pistol and quickly eliminates the threat.

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Airmen from various career fields within the 93d Air Ground Operations (AGOW) traveled to Smoky Hill Air National Guard Range, Kan., to participate in a course that made techniques like this second nature.

The gun course was held Aug. 26-31, which incorporated their specific duties as tactical air control party (TACP) members and security forces personnel and built on their gunfighting skills.

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“The full spectrum operator course bridges the gap between the traditional combat arms instructor training (CATM) and what they’re going to face downrange facing off with enemy combatants,” said Master Sgt. Joe Aton, 93d AGOW joint terminal attack controller (JTAC) program superintendent. “Traditional CATM shooting is shooting at paper (from various positions) while this course will prepare guys for what they’re going to see in real combat.”

Fast transitions to their side arm, organizing their gear so it didn’t hinder their ability to aim or reload their weapons and practicing proper form when firing were all lessons hit hard during the first few days of the course.

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A mix of veterans, guard and reserve members whom have varying levels of combat experience run the course, hoping to impart their knowledge to today’s warfighters.

“The mission is to save lives,” said Brian Hartman, chief instructor. “It’s all about the troops that are downrange … there’s rarely a week that goes by that we don’t receive communication from folks who are using material that we’ve given them and it’s helped them gain or maintain the edge in an encounter.

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“That’s the greatest feeling in the world; there’s no better job satisfaction than that, but we want to share the wealth,” Hartman added. “It’s about getting that information pushed out there and getting everybody back home safe to see their kids grow up.”

Various air support operations squadrons chose one experienced and new JTAC to participate, while the 820th Base Defense Group chose a new defender and a fire team leader.

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While the course primarily focused on gunfight techniques, it also incorporated exercises that challenged specific job skills. Airmen were challenged on their mindset of the feel and look of a “real-world” gunfight.

“One of the most challenging things we impart to people will be mindset,” said Hartman. “In a real environment a small mistake can magnify massively into a huge mistake which can have severe consequences to you, your teammate and can have a ripple effect on down the line.

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“That shift in mindset to make everybody treat every single bullet as though it’s a gift,” Hartman added. “Every single minute; every second they step out onto the range should be treated as though they’re in the real environment and could have to use these skills tomorrow. If we knew we’d have to do it tomorrow it might change the way we approach training today.”

Throughout the course, Airmen moved tactically through dangerous crossings where they had to return fire and call in close air support, all while being held accountable for every mistake.

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“I think the biggest challenge is breaking bad habits,” said 1st Lt. Andrew Janosick, 20th Air Support Operations Squadron joint terminal attack controller (JTAC). “We haven’t had a lot of dynamic weapons training so breaking out of our comfort zone, learning these dynamic movements and being comfortable behind the weapon (is great).

In addition to revamping the way they shoot during the course, Airmen were encouraged to take the techniques and knowledge back to their squadron and incorporate it.

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“I’m hoping to take back as much information from this course (as I can),” said Tech. Sgt. James Estep, 822d Base Defense Squadron fire team leader. “(Especially) ways to think outside of the box when it comes to shooting and honing your skills. It’s really nice having a wide variety of career fields out here. You’re either learning new things from them or they’re learning from you so it shines a new light on things.”

Like any skill, if you don’t use it, you lose it; which is why Aton also hopes to incorporate this course into the current training AGOW Airmen receive.

“I think this is something that should become one of the foundations for our guys as far as gunfighting which is a basic skill everybody should have,” said Aton. “It’s also a perishable skill so it should be something we do annually.”

Story and photos by Senior Airman Janiqua P. Robinson, 23d Wing Public Affairs

Max Talk Monday – Why the ‘Lone Wolf Operator’ Will Die: Individual Assault

Monday, September 10th, 2018

Max Talk 034: Why the ‘Lone Wolf Operator’ will Die (2): Individual Assault

This is the fourth installment of ‘Max Talk Monday’ which shares select episodes from a series of instructional videos. Max Velocity Tactical (MVT) has established a reputation on the leading edge of tactical live fire and force on force training. MVT is dedicated to developing and training tactical excellence at the individual and team level.

Somewhat provocatively titled, Max Talk 034 is a discussion and live fire demonstration of the disadvantages of working as a ‘lone wolf operator.’ This is a follow-on from Max Talk 033, where Max ran a break contact scenario as an individual. Here, Max conducts an assault as an individual and gives it a good shot with some Individual Movement Techniques (IMT), but clearly the inability to conduct proper fire and movement is an issue.

Max is a tactical trainer and author, a lifelong professional soldier with extensive military experience. He served with British Special Operations Forces, both enlisted and as a commissioned officer; a graduate of the Royal Military Academy Sandhurst. Max served on numerous operational deployments, and also served as a recruit instructor. Max spent five years serving as a paramilitary contractor in both Iraq and Afghanistan; the latter two years working for the British Government in Helmand Province, Afghanistan. 

Website: Max Velocity Tactical

YouTube: Max Velocity Tactical