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Archive for the ‘Navy’ Category

Mountain Horse and NP Aerospace Selected for US Navy Maritime Body Armor Contract

Thursday, August 6th, 2020

LASA LWB III+ IC06 MBP Maritime Buoyant Plate

Mountain Horse Solutions, a U.S. Defense and Mission Critical Equipment Supplier, based in Union City TN, and NP Aerospace, a ballistic hard armor company, have been awarded a four-year U.S. Navy Maritime Buoyant Plate body armor contract framework valued at over $20m.

Mountain Horse and NP Aerospace will supply up to 11,000 of the LASA LWB III+ IC06 MBP Maritime Buoyant Plates, which are lightweight and feature a highly durable waterproof Polyurea coating. The contract framework is for a four-year period and has a maximum value of $20,599,334. Mountain Horse and NP Aerospace were selected due to their ability to meet U.S. Navy strict performance requirements.

Mountain Horse, a key supplier to the U.S. Armed Forces and Government Agencies, selected NP Aerospace as hard armor manufacturer due to the company’s extensive experience working with global defense organizations including Canada’s Department of National Defence and the UK Ministry of Defence. NP Aerospace has supplied over 200,000 body armor plates to British and Canadian Armed Forces, more than 1 million ballistic helmets and armor systems for over 2,000 NATO vehicles used in overseas operations.

Chris Witts, Director, Mountain Horse Solutions, said: “We are thrilled and honored to be awarded this contract. Supplying the U.S. Navy with a top-quality critical safety product, like the Maritime Buoyant Hard Armor plate, is a significant achievement. Mountain Horse Solutions is an expert in supply chain management and prides itself in providing the US Armed Forces with the highest quality and most innovative equipment available. This award confirms the strength of Mountain Horse Solutions’ partnership with NP Aerospace and our commitment to supplying rapid response innovative solutions to the military.”

James Kempston, CEO, NP Aerospace, said: “Being awarded the U.S. Navy Maritime Buoyant Plate body armor contract is a testament to our experience in composite armor technology. Our personal armor has been used by frontline allied forces for over 25 years.  We are proud to be supporting Mountain Horse and the U.S. Navy in supplying our troops with the lightest weight, highest performing, top quality products in the market. The LWB III+ IC06 MBP Maritime Buoyant Plate is able to comfortably meet the ballistic threat required by the U.S. Navy and delivers the wearability and buoyancy required in maritime operations.”

NP Aerospace is a global armor manufacturer with extensive experience in complex, military programs. The company’s body armor portfolio includes a range of ballistic plates to meet demanding defense requirements from NIJ Level III plates for standard military operations to NIJ Level IV plus special threats plates.

Mountain Horse Solutions and NP Aerospace were awarded the Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA) contract N61331-20-D-0014, as an ID/IQ (Indefinite Delivery / Indefinite Quantity) to provide Maritime Buoyant Body Armor (MBP), both in torso and side configurations.

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Draper Kaufman the Godfather of UDTs/SEALS

Sunday, August 2nd, 2020

On August 4 we celebrate Rear Admiral (ret) Draper Laurence Kauffman birthday. Admiral Kauffman is credited with starting the Underwater Demolishing Teams and being the first U.S. frogman. He is called the father or Godfather of the SEALS teams.

He graduated from the US Naval Academy in 1933. But because he had bad eyesight, he was made a reserve officer. At the start of WWII, he volunteered for the America Volunteer Ambulance Corp in Paris. During the German blitz of London, he severed as a bomb disposal officer. One month before Pearl Harbor he returned to the U.S. and joined the Naval Reserve. He is credited with inventing Motivation week, better known as Hell Week in Basic Underwater Demolition / SEAL training (BUD/S). Just that last accomplishment is worthy of calling him the Godfather.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Draper_Kauffman

huckberry.com/journal/posts/the-godfather-of-the-navy-seals

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Americans Navy

Sunday, July 5th, 2020

In the early 1770s, a Connecticut inventor David Bushnell started designing what would be the first submersible. It was a small egg-shaped and less than eight feet tall. Her hull was constructed from two oak shells held together by steel bands and waterproof with a thick layer of tar. It had ventilation tubes, a compass, and a device for determining depth. Attached to the exterior was a primitive bomb. The pilot entered the vessel through a hatch at the top. There were a couple of small glass windows that provided very light and visibility. It was operated by a hand crank that propelled it and a tiller that steered it. The operator also controlled the hand pump that regulated the ballast that submerged and surfaced the craft. Once submerged and the ventilation tubes were closed, there was about 30 minutes worth. It was called “Turtle” because of the two “shells” put together to make it. It is also referred to as Americas Turtle.

In the spring of 1776, about a year into the Revolutionary War, Bushnell wrote to General George Washington asking if the Turtle could be used in defense of New York City’s harbor. Washington accepted the offer. Around midnight on 6 September, the Turtle, piloted by Army sergeant Ezra Lee. That’s right, the first submarine action by the U.S. Navy was led by an Army guy.

It took Lee two hours to get to his target; a British ship named the HMS Eagle. Once he positioned himself beneath the vessel, he was supposed to drill into her hull using a bit attached to Turtle’s top hatch. Once the hole was deep enough, he would anchor his explosive device to the ship’s hull. He had about 30 minutes to get away from the Eagle before the charge would detonate. That was the plan, but Lee’s bit got stuck in a metal part of the hull. On his second attempt, the Turtle bobbed to the surface and he was spotted. As he headed for shore, Lee released his “torpedo,” which exploded harmlessly in the middle of the East River.

Even though Lee wasn’t successful in sinking or doing damage to the HMS Eagle (other than a small drill hole) it was the U.S. first attempt at underwater warfare, and it was one of the first in a very young countries Navy. Secondarily the failed attack ultimately forced the British to move their fleet of 200 ships to where they thought was a safer location. The threat of underwater attack kept the British fleet on their toes throughout the war and made them use more resources and manpower to protect their ships then they normally would have. Much like using Special Forces behind the enemy lines in modern warfare. So, it turns out it wasn’t as big of a failure as first thought. The basic principles used by America’s Turtle still remain valid in submarine warfare today. In recognition of Bushnell’s achievement, the U.S. Navy named two submarine tenders in his honor, one during World War I and one during World War II. Inevitably, the ships were nicknamed “Turtle.”

Coronavirus Defense: Navy Develops 3D-Printed Tactical Masks for US Forces Korea

Thursday, June 25th, 2020

ARLINGTON, Va. (NNS) — The coronavirus pandemic has caused a global shortage of surgical face masks and other personal protective equipment (PPE), including for warfighters stationed at U.S. Forces Korea.

To address this, the Office of Naval Research (ONR) Global TechSolutions is working with multiple partners to develop prototypes of 3D-printable (also called additive manufactured) masks for use at Camp Humphreys in South Korea.

The prototypes are designed for warfighters needing masks for use with tactical gear like combat helmets and protective visors—security personnel, for example. Printed from medical-grade plastic, with a replaceable filter, the masks form a tighter seal around the nose and mouth. This forces breathed air through the filter only, instead of through gaps between the fabric and skin, reducing infection risk.

“This shows the power of effective collaboration in meeting an urgent need,” said TechSolutions Director Jason Payne. “It enables us to do whatever we can to slow the spread of coronavirus and keep it contained to the best of our ability—so it doesn’t prevent our warfighters from performing their missions.”

TechSolutions is ONR Global’s rapid-response science and technology program that develops prototype technologies to address problems voiced by Sailors and Marines, within approximately 12 months. The PPE collaboration involves the U.S. Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command, U.S. Forces Korea and the Naval Undersea Warfare Center (NUWC) Division Keyport.

The project stems from efforts by Mark Buffum, the ONR Global science advisor assigned to U.S. Forces Korea. When the coronavirus pandemic began, South Korea emerged as a hotspot, resulting in PPE shortages throughout that country. Other regions of Asia saw similar shortages, including multiple suppliers to U.S. Forces Korea.

Buffum researched creative ways in which command personnel responded to PPE shortages. He coordinated with the Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command to leverage a donation of bulk filter material from a Pennsylvania-based manufacturing supplier—as well as a mask design from an Army officer stationed at U.S. Forces Korea—to 3D-print masks. Unfortunately, the “hobby-grade” machine available at Camp Humphreys could only produce seven masks daily. 

Seeking to expand this capability, Buffum contacted TechSolutions and partnered with Payne’s team and NUWC Keyport—which has industrial-grade 3D printers able to manufacture hundreds of masks a day.

TechSolutions agreed to sponsor a project consisting of multiple products:

—Several 3D-printed prototypes for evaluation

—500 3D-printed masks comprising all prototype styles

—Resin molds of the prototypes. Creating masks from resin, instead of medical-grade plastic, enables hobby-grade 3D printers to produce 10 times as many masks each day.

—Technical data packages with instructions for 3D-printing or resin pouring, as well as maintaining mask designs 

U.S. Forces Korea and the Army’s Combat Capabilities Development Command are evaluating the prototype masks. Once they decide on a design, they’ll work with NUWC Keyport to 3D-print large quantities of masks.

“This is a good test of how we can respond to the needs of the fleet in an emergency,” said Ross Wilhelm, principal technologist for NUWC Keyport’s Maintenance, Engineering and Industrial Operations Department. “How many masks can we produce and how fast? We hope this serves as a model for Department of Defense commands worldwide.”

In addition to tactical applications, Buffum hopes to see versions of the masks made for medical personnel and first responders to use during the coronavirus pandemic as well as future health crises.

“These masks can play a key role in strengthening our medical infrastructure of preparedness,” he said. “That way, people won’t be scrambling for supplies at the beginning of another pandemic.”

For more news from Office of Naval Research, visit www.navy.mil/local/onr.

Story by Warren Duffie Jr., a contractor for ONR Corporate Strategic Communications.

US Army photo by KCpl. Hanmin Yun. 2ID/RUCD Public Affairs

First US Navy Warrant Officer 1 Grads in Decades Hailed at LDO/CWO Academy

Tuesday, November 5th, 2019

NEWPORT, R.I. (Nov. 1, 2019) (NNS) — The first eight Navy warrant officer 1 (WO1) Sailors in decades graduated from the Limited Duty Officer/Chief Warrant Officer (LDO/CWO) Academy at Officer Training Command, Newport (OTCN), Nov. 1.

The new warrant officers are Benjamin Nichols, Jonathon Wynn, Brent Gray, Ryan Snyder, Devan Sorenson, Nicholas Drenning, Kevin Koller, and Brian Ruzin.

“I’m enthusiastic for this new program because we can pave the way for the future of the Navy’s cyberwarfare efforts,” said Warrant Officer Devan T. Sorenson, from Bozeman, Montana. “The unique world of this career field is modeled like a meritocracy where it is a collaborative environment to be effective. The evolution of technology outpaces the training so it is important to stay current.”

“Our expertise comes from the enlisted ranks and we can better assist officers to make those necessary decisions through our experience,” said Warrant Officer Ryan C. Snyder, from Hollis, New Hampshire. “It is essential to be innovative and always strive to be the subject matter experts in this fast-paced field of cyberwarfare.”

The LDO/CWO Academy is a four-week course designed to prepare these prior enlisted Sailors for their new roles in the wardroom per the Navy’s Officer Professional Core Competencies. The class officers at the schoolhouse develop these newly commissioned officers morally, mentally, and physically, and imbue them with the highest ideals of honor, courage, and commitment in order to prepare them for the Fleet. Additionally, the academy will prepare these officers to become effective leaders by developing fundamental skills in leadership, written and oral communication, career management and administration.

“The new WO1 program opens up more advancement and designator opportunities,” said Cmdr. Zeverick L. Butts, the Director of the LDO/CWO Academy. “These new students bring unique skillsets and perspectives, increasing the dynamic interaction in the classroom for problem solving.”

The eight WO1s along with the 45 LDOs and CWOs of class 20010 graduated during a ceremony on Nov. 1, 2019. Graduates of this academy, nicknamed “Mustang University,” will join the LDO/CWO community to support the war-fighting capability and readiness of Naval Forces through leadership, technical proficiency and experience.

NAVADMIN 140/18 announced the implementation of the WO1 pay grade (W-1) for cyber warrant officers, and solicited applications for the FY-19 and FY-20 WO1 Cyber Warrant Selection Boards, the first since 1975. The rank was reinstated through the Cyber Warrant Officer In-Service Procurement Selection Board as the result of increasing threat of cyberwarfare on the modern battlefield. To be eligible, E5 and above applicants must be in the Cryptologic Technician Networks (CTN) rating, possess at least one of the following Interactive On-Net (ION) Operator naval enlisted classifications (NEC): H13A, H14A, H15A, or H16A, and meet time-in-service requirements.

Officers appointed as cyber WO1 incur a six-year service obligation from the date of appointment, shall serve a minimum time in grade of 3 years and must complete a minimum of 12 years of time in service prior to promotion and commissioning to Chief Warrant Officer 2.

The distinctive insignia worn on the WO1 cover of two cross-fouled anchors makes them easily recognizable in place of the traditional officer badge worn by other Naval Officers.

Headquartered in Newport, Rhode Island, OTCN oversees Officer Candidate School, Officer Development School and Limited Duty Officer/Chief Warrant Officer Academy.

Get more information about the Navy from US Navy facebook or twitter.

For more news from Naval Service Training Command, visit www.navy.mil/local/greatlakes

Story by Lt Cdr Frederick Martin, Naval Service Training Command Public Affairs

Photo by Darwin Lam

Hawaii-based Sailors Test Changes During Physical Fitness Assessment Study

Thursday, October 31st, 2019

PEARL HARBOR, Hawaii (NNS) — Ladies and gentlemen, it’s that time of the year again: physical fitness assessment season. As we’re surrounded by the unwavering dedication of command fitness leaders and the Sailors within each command, one can’t help but get in to the fitness spirit. On May 29, the former Chief of Naval Operations Adm. John Richardson visited Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam and announced the addition of the 2-kilometer row cardio option and forearm plank that will replace the curl-up. On Oct. 7, Sailors gathered in the fitness center on base to commence the testing of the new workout metrics.

The study consisted of three different days of exercise. Day one focused on introducing Sailors to the 2-kilometer row, practicing the correct rowing technique. On day two, the Sailors performed pushups, the forearm plank and the 12-minute bike assessment. Day three focused on pushups, the forearm plank and the second trial of the 2-kilometer row. A big focus during this study was how Sailors perform the new plank as opposed to the curl-ups.

“The plank allows you to build that core strength,” said Lt. Cmdr. Melissa Laird, the work sponsor of the study from the 21st Century Sailor office. “It’s really a better test and better modality to assess that core strength than the curl-up is. It works on giving you good posture and it also has less chance of aggravating low back injuries which you can see with the curl-up.”

Laird also said that adopting a new form of cardio within the PFA allows Sailors an alternative to the standard 1.5-mile run. The rower uses approximately 70 percent of the body’s musculature so it provides a good cardiovascular workout that is low impact.

Sailors representing multiple commands volunteered to be the test subjects for this study. A seamless transition into adopting these two modalities for the PFA in the year 2020 is the end goal according to Laird.

Mr. Jay Heaney, a research physiologist from the Naval Health Research Center and the principle investigator for the study, explained the process of gathering the information from the Sailors’ performance and how it will be applied to the new PFA.

“We try to get as many people as we can within the age groups by gender,” said Heaney. “Then we look for what the norms are; what the high, medium and low scores are. From that, we will develop what the scoring metrics are for the different categories of the PFA.”

Heaney said that the Navy is trying to put a bigger emphasis on physical fitness as ship-based Sailors are required to climb ladder ways and do a lot of heavy lifting throughout their workday.

“I volunteered because I wanted to see what the new PFA would look like,” said Cryptologic Technician (Interpretive) 3rd Class Amanda Zwiebel. “Not only to prepare myself but to prepare my peers and my command.”

According to Heaney, at the end of the day, it is important that our service members have complete physical readiness. The addition of two new workouts to the PFA helps the U.S. Navy move in the right direction.

 

By Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Aja Bleu Jackson, NPASE West det. Hawaii Public Affairs

TacJobs – Navy Information Warfare

Sunday, October 27th, 2019

SCUBAPRO Sunday – US Navy Birthday

Sunday, October 13th, 2019

On 13, OCTOBER 1775 the Second Continental Congress passed a resolution creating official establishment the Continental Navy. They voted to outfit two sailing vessels, armed with ten carriage guns, as well as swivel guns, and manned by crews of eighty, and to send them out on a cruise for three months to intercept transports carrying munitions and stores meant for the British army in America. Throughout the War of Independence, the Continental Navy sent to sea more than fifty armed vessels. The Navy’s squadrons and cruisers seized enemy supplies and carried correspondence and diplomats to Europe, returning with needed munitions. They took nearly 200 British vessels as prizes, and some of the British Isles themselves, contributing to the demoralization of the enemy and forcing the British to divert warships to protect convoys and thier  trade routes. But with the end of the American Revolutionary War, the Continental Navy was disbanded. Then with threats to American merchant shipping by Barbary pirates from four North African States, in the Mediterranean, President George Washington signed the Naval Act of 1794 the act authorizing the construction of the Navy’sNavy’s first six frigates ? Congress passed a resolution to establish a national navy that could protect U.S. commercial vessels from attacks by Barbary pirates in the Mediterranean and nearby Atlantic waters.