SIG Sauer Academy

Archive for the ‘Maritime’ Category

SCUBAPRO Sunday – What to Wear Under Your Wetsuits?

Sunday, May 22nd, 2022

Most people wear something under their wetsuit to help with getting their wetsuit on and off easier. The other reason for wearing something under your wetsuits is that the extra layers can help keep your body warmer. Instead of wearing a thicker wetsuit that will restrict your movement, it allows you to wear a thinner suit that will give you more flexibility. You can wear a short sleeve top or bottom to help keep your core warmer. The other thing to think about is the air temperature/ wind on your way to the dive site. Suppose you are worried about the air temp/ wind when you are traveling to the dive site. In that case, you can wear heavyweight GoreTex or a linebacker jacket (the kind made for helo’s flights/ football players wear on the sidelines) is excellent to have as you can take it off before the dive and put it on when you are done.

SCUBAPRO 1.5mm Everflex SS top

For colder temperatures, adding layers underneath the suit is the way to go. You have several options to choose from. If you already have a thinner wetsuit that you usually use for warmer environments, a 1mm rash guard, or any other type of garment that’ll provide you with the added warmth around your chest will help. SCUBAPRO makes a great 1.5mm top and bottoms in short and long sleeves, shorts, and long pants. This 1.5mm is very warm, and to me, it feels like I am wearing a 2-3mm.

SCUBAPRO 1.5mm Everflex long pants

When you have to worry about the wind, most surf wetsuits or wetsuits glossy like surf suits are made to stop the wind. That all-suit surf suits are not great for diving as most are not made from a material (yes, surfing is different than diving) that is designed to be used underwater for long periods. Some people like to wear nothing between them and their wetsuits. This can be painful after wearing a wetsuit for a long time, especially on a long wet Zodiac ride. Due to the constant rubbing against their skin, it begins to chafe ( AKA Baboon a$$). Usually, the neck, armpits, behind the knees, and the crotch are the first to go. You can apply anti-chafing gel/ Vaseline to help with this on long dives and rides. There is also stuff like Butt Paste, Triple paste, or Anti monkey butt paste.

SCUBAPRO 1.5mm Everflex LS top

You can also wear dive skin or bike shorts; this will help with donning and doffing your suit on and off also. I have started to use compression shorts. (They make tops also) They are made with a material called Celliant; it is a mineral-infused fabric to take the energy you give off when you work and reflect it into your muscles, increasing blood flow and helping them work harder. As your body emits energy, the mineral-infused fabric absorbs & reflects it, improving endurance. (I know this sounds crazy, but I am a big believer in Celliant)

Whatever you decide to wear, keep in mind the water/ air temperature, duration of the dive, and what you will be doing. Also, one reason you should make sure to keep a logbook of all your dives. That way, you can look up what you have used in the past for this situation. That should put you at a good starting point. Now that you’re aware of your options, it’s time to get to specifics. What type of undergarment is right for your needs, or do you even need to wear anything under your wetsuit at all?

SCUBAPRO 1.5mm Everflex

Well, that depends on you. In warmer waters, you can get away with wearing undergarments with minimal coverage (swimsuits, trunks, and other similar items)—or even nothing at all. Many people prefer to go commando under their wetsuits, but it’s all a matter of preference. If you plan to rent the suit, however, you’re probably going to want to wear something underneath.

SCUBAPRO 1mm Topical wetsuit

For colder temperatures, adding layers underneath the suit is the way to go. You have several options to choose from. Suppose you already have a thinner wetsuit that you usually use for warmer environments. In that case, you can opt to add a jumpsuit, rash guard, or any other type of garment that’ll provide you with the added insulation you need. This way, you won’t have to purchase another suit.

SCUBAPRO Hybrid Hood Vest

Or, if you’d instead go naked warrior underneath, you can get a thicker wetsuit. Deciding what to wear ultimately depends on the environment (and temperature) you plan to dive in, how sensitive your body is too cold, and many other variables. Make sure to consider all factors before you buy anything, and always try it in training before you use it for the first time when it matters the most.

SOFIC 22 – SOAL Marine

Friday, May 20th, 2022

SOAL Marine Group exhibited with Wing Inflatables. The Kraka Jet Board is a rigid inflatable platform which can be manned or unmanned to perform infiltration and exfiltration of swimmers and material, ISR, and even armed overwatch.

It can navigated by its passengers, remote controlled, or programmed for a predetermined course. Kraka Jet Board can be airdropped and is inflatable within seconds thanks to an onboard air tank.

The system can also be cached up to 26 meters underwater and is powered by a 11 kW brushless electric motor offering up to 18 knots of speed. The rechargeable battery that can be swapped out as needed.

A remote weapon station or ISR mast can also be placed on the Kraka. This model will support two fully equipped swimmers but there are larger versions which will support a quad or Polaris UTV for river crossings.

FirstSpear Friday Focus: USMC GEN III Flotation Cummerbund

Friday, May 20th, 2022

Life-Saving Flotation System For American Warfighters.

Recently showcased at Modern Day Marine May 10-12, 2022 (Pictured above is the current USMC PC GEN III with existing issued cummerbund on the right side, as worn, and the FirstSpear USMC GEN III Flotation Cummerbund on the left.

The USMC GEN III Flotation Cummerbund is FirstSpear’s answer to the United States Marine Corps need for life-saving kit during maritime operations.

This cummerbund features a 6/12™ Laser Fused Platform for weight reduction and Tubes® Fasteners, which are already being used on the current USMC PC GEN III. Tubes® Fasteners allow for easy everyday donning and doffing as well as emergencies.

Featuring a top access panel, the cummerbund allows users easy access to the 38 gram CO2 cartridge for pre-mission checks and inspection. The CTAF (Cummerbund Tactical Aid to Flotation) is designed to be user friendly with repacking and maintenance at the unit level.

Authorized for Naval Use (ANU), this CTAF (Cummerbund Tactical Aid to Flotation) is on contract with DOD. Compatible with all sizes of the USMC GEN III plate carrier, the cummerbund fits 6” x 8” and 6” x 6” sides plates and requires no modifications to the current USMC PC GEN III.

Check out FirstSpear for more cutting-edge innovation.

SOFIC 22 – Alligator Engineering

Wednesday, May 18th, 2022

Alligator Engineering is exhibiting with Wing Inflatable Solutions and showing their KDUCK – (FMP) Mod 2 fixture which offers a single point of attachment, suspension, and release of an unmodified P4.7 inflatable boat configured with full mission equipment to an H-60 series helicopter for Kangaroo Duck operations.

It is installed in minutes and ensures negligible aerodynamic effects to the helo throughout the flight profile.

Contact Alligator Engineering at [email protected]

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Finning Techniques

Sunday, May 15th, 2022

Finning is the process of generating propulsion. In that sense, it is probably the most basic of all the diving skills, and one that most of us are already able to do when we first start diving.

In particular, a better finning technique, choosing the right technique for the right circumstances, can increase your dive’s efficiency.

This will decrease your air consumption, reduce physical fatigue, and extending your dives. Picking the right finning technique will also decrease the amount of silt you turn up. I am going to talk about four types of SCUBAPRO fins.  The Jet fin, the Seawing Nova Gorilla, The Seawing Nova, and the Go Sport fins. The Jet Fin is the most wildly used fin in the world by profession divers, the SeaWing Nova, the SeaWing Nova Gorillas (a stiffer version of the Seawing Nova that is great for people that who are strong kickers). The Go Sport fin is new to our line and is a tremendous all-around fin for diving, surface swimming like OTB and River and Stream crossing. Lastly are the Twin Jet fins, again a SCUBAPRO iconic fin; it is used by strong kickers that like to use a flutter kick type stroke.

There are three main fin kicks that any diver should know. These are flutter kicks, frog kicks, and bent-knee cave diver kicks.

Flutter kicks

The flutter kick is the basic finning technique that most divers use. This technique is similar to the leg part of freestyle swimming.

Watch 90 percent of all divers, and you’ll see them use flutter kicks. In the early days of diving, it was the only technique taught. The reason for its popularity is quite simply that it is the strongest of all the kicking techniques, and it generates a lot of propulsion. Back in the early days of diving, before the invention of the BCD, speed was the primary way of maintaining buoyancy. The advantage of this kick is the forcefulness of it. It is excellent for moving at high speed or when fighting a current. The legs’ vertical up-down movement also means it is beneficial for wall diving, mainly when diving by a wall covered in corals. There’s less risk of kicking something on the side of you like your dive buddy, coral or the finning’s backwash, stirring up sediment. The disadvantages of this kick are related to the advantages. The forcefulness of the kick means that it is relatively strenuous and increases air consumption because of it. The vertical movement can steer up a lot of silt; this is bad for many reasons. If you are on a combat swimmer operation, the trail of silt can give you away. Second, it will make it hard for anyone following you to see their gauges and find the target. (unless you are using the SCUBAPRO HUD dive computer) (shameless plug, but it is excellent for low visibility). In confined spaces like close to the target around the piers or in a cave, it can cause a blackout and make it very hard to see what you are doing.

A fast, powerful technique is useful when fighting a current, for short bursts of speed. The best fins for this are the SCUBAPRO SeaWing Nova Gorillas, The Go Sports, and the Jet fans.

Frog kick

The frog kick looks very similar to the leg portion of the breaststroke from swimming. A large and wide kick that utilizes the leg’s full strength is a good, general technique for open-water diving, either in the water column or close to the bottom. Because the movement and propulsion aren’t continuous, good buoyancy technique is required, though.

The movement here is horizontal, or close to it, meaning that there is minimal disturbance of the bottom when swimming close to the bottom, which will maintain the visibility for any divers that come after you. However, the kick’s width means that the kick isn’t recommended for caves or when diving close to a wall.

This kick, combined with good buoyancy, will quickly become your go-to technique once you get used to it, and will likely decrease your air consumption significantly. The more adequately trimmed your position in the water, and the more you take advantage of the gliding phase before initiating the next kick, the more you’ll reduce your energy (and air) consumption.

The powerful kick that can be extremely efficient, especially if you master the kick-and-glide aspect. Suitable for open-water diving in mild currents, in the water column, or close to the bottom. Not advisable in stronger currents or close to walls.

The best fins for this are the Jet fins.

Bent-Knee Cave Diver Kick

With the complicated name, this technique is the go-to technique for technical divers and is the one that causes the least disturbance of the environment. The bent knees mean that the movement is minimal, with the entire kick coming only from a small movement in the hips, combined with a kick of the ankles. This means that propulsion is limited, compared to the two kicks above, but it also decreases strain and air consumption.

The small movement means that it works well in cramped areas, such as inside wrecks and caves, and, when executed correctly, can minimize the amount of silt kicked up to almost nothing. For this reason, it is also the recommended technique for diving close a very silty bottom, like in a confined space, close to piers or around ships.

The slow movement also means that this technique helps you slow down, making it useful for muck dives or other nature dives where you’ll be looking for small animal life. Because it is a very low-propulsion kick, this technique has its limitation when swimming against a current, though. This is a minimal-impact kick that is ideal for cramped environments and close to very silty bottoms, as well as helping you slow down during your dives and maximize your available air. The Jet Fin is the best fin for this, and with some practice, the Go Sport is good also.

Lastly, the SeaWing Nova Gorillas come in OD Green or Orange, but they can be special ordered in all black. You can also order the SeaWing Nova in all black. Special orders require a minimum of 24 per size, but we can work to get you want you need.

Contact [email protected] for more information.

Tulmar Safety Systems to be Unveil Next Generation Tactical Life Preserver at SOFIC 2022

Wednesday, May 11th, 2022

Tulmar Safety Systems will be unveiling their next generation tactical life preserver during SOFIC 2022

Developed from over 30+ years experience in the design and development of tactical flotation systems for maritime special operations forces and tactical law enforcement agencies.  

• Streamlined low profile shooter’s cut allows unimpeded weapons handling, climbing, rappelling, fast roping, and confined space movement. 

• Lightweight and highly compact, yet durable; built to withstand the rigors of tactical training and operational environment use. 

• Provides 40+ lbs of self-righting buoyancy. 

• Easily attaches and integrates with most MOLLE/PALS tactical armor systems.

• Re-arm and re-pack in less than 5 minutes under operational conditions with no tools required.

To schedule a product capability brief, please contact [email protected].

MDM 22 – IG-Interceptor RIB

Tuesday, May 10th, 2022

The IG-Interceptor RIB Extreme Purpose Intereiction Craft is an interesting mobility solution that combines a rigid inflatable boat with tracked “landing gear” to self-deploy the boat into the water.

Featuring a carbon fiber hull it can reach surface speeds of 50 knots once in the water.

www.iguanaproUSA.com

SCUBAPRO Sunday – Finning Techniques

Sunday, May 8th, 2022

Finning is the process of generating propulsion. In that sense, it is probably the most basic of all the diving skills, and one that most of us are already able to do when we first start diving.

In particular, a better finning technique, choosing the right technique for the right circumstances, can increase your dive’s efficiency.

This will decrease your air consumption, reduce physical fatigue, and extending your dives. Picking the right finning technique will also decrease the amount of silt you turn up. I am going to talk about four types of SCUBAPRO fins.  The Jet fin, the Seawing Nova Gorilla, The Seawing Nova, and the Go Sport fins. The Jet Fin is the most wildly used fin in the world by profession divers, the SeaWing Nova, the SeaWing Nova Gorillas (a stiffer version of the Seawing Nova that is great for people that who are strong kickers). The Go Sport fin is new to our line and is a tremendous all-around fin for diving, surface swimming like OTB and River and Stream crossing. Lastly are the Twin Jet fins, again a SCUBAPRO iconic fin; it is used by strong kickers that like to use a flutter kick type stroke.

There are three main fin kicks that any diver should know. These are flutter kicks, frog kicks, and bent-knee cave diver kicks.

Flutter kicks

The flutter kick is the basic finning technique that most divers use. This technique is similar to the leg part of freestyle swimming.

Watch 90 percent of all divers, and you’ll see them use flutter kicks. In the early days of diving, it was the only technique taught. The reason for its popularity is quite simply that it is the strongest of all the kicking techniques, and it generates a lot of propulsion. Back in the early days of diving, before the invention of the BCD, speed was the primary way of maintaining buoyancy. The advantage of this kick is the forcefulness of it. It is excellent for moving at high speed or when fighting a current. The legs’ vertical up-down movement also means it is beneficial for wall diving, mainly when diving by a wall covered in corals. There’s less risk of kicking something on the side of you like your dive buddy, coral or the finning’s backwash, stirring up sediment. The disadvantages of this kick are related to the advantages. The forcefulness of the kick means that it is relatively strenuous and increases air consumption because of it. The vertical movement can steer up a lot of silt; this is bad for many reasons. If you are on a combat swimmer operation, the trail of silt can give you away. Second, it will make it hard for anyone following you to see their gauges and find the target. (unless you are using the SCUBAPRO HUD dive computer) (shameless plug, but it is excellent for low visibility).  In confined spaces like close to the target around the piers or in a cave, it can cause a blackout and make it very hard to see what you are doing.

A fast, powerful technique is useful when fighting a current, for short bursts of speed. The best fins for this are the SCUBAPRO SeaWing Nova Gorillas, The Go Sports, and the Jet fans.

Frog kick

The frog kick looks very similar to the leg portion of the breaststroke from swimming. A large and wide kick that utilizes the leg’s full strength is a good, general technique for open-water diving, either in the water column or close to the bottom. Because the movement and propulsion aren’t continuous, good buoyancy technique is required, though. 

The movement here is horizontal, or close to it, meaning that there is minimal disturbance of the bottom when swimming close to the bottom, which will maintain the visibility for any divers that come after you. However, the kick’s width means that the kick isn’t recommended for caves or when diving close to a wall.

This kick, combined with good buoyancy, will quickly become your go-to technique once you get used to it, and will likely decrease your air consumption significantly. The more adequately trimmed your position in the water, and the more you take advantage of the gliding phase before initiating the next kick, the more you’ll reduce your energy (and air) consumption.

The powerful kick that can be extremely efficient, especially if you master the kick-and-glide aspect. Suitable for open-water diving in mild currents, in the water column, or close to the bottom. Not advisable in stronger currents or close to walls.

The best fins for this are the Jet fins.

Bent-Knee Cave Diver Kick

With the complicated name, this technique is the go-to technique for technical divers and is the one that causes the least disturbance of the environment. The bent knees mean that the movement is minimal, with the entire kick coming only from a small movement in the hips, combined with a kick of the ankles. This means that propulsion is limited, compared to the two kicks above, but it also decreases strain and air consumption.

The small movement means that it works well in cramped areas, such as inside wrecks and caves, and, when executed correctly, can minimize the amount of silt kicked up to almost nothing. For this reason, it is also the recommended technique for diving close a very silty bottom, like in a confined space, close to piers or around ships.

The slow movement also means that this technique helps you slow down, making it useful for muck dives or other nature dives where you’ll be looking for small animal life. Because it is a very low-propulsion kick, this technique has its limitation when swimming against a current, though. This is a minimal-impact kick that is ideal for cramped environments and close to very silty bottoms, as well as helping you slow down during your dives and maximize your available air. The Jet Fin is the best fin this, and with some practice, the Go Sport is good also.

Lastly, the SeaWing Nova Gorillas come in OD Green or Orange, but they can be special ordered in all black. You can also order the SeaWing Nova in all black. Special orders require a minimum of 24 per size, but we can work to get you want you need.

Contact [email protected] for more information.