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USMC Marksmanship Technology Demonstration 2018

Tuesday, August 14th, 2018

Each Fall, the Marine Corps Weapons Training Battalion hosts an opportunity for industry to show them what they’ve got cooking. This year’s Marksmanship Technology Demonstration will be held at Calvin A. Lloyd Range Complex, Weapons Training Battalion, Marine Corps Base Quantico from 26-27 September 2018.  The MTD has been aligned with Modern Day Marine to take advantage of similar events.

MTD 2018 will focus on six technology areas:

1.      Small arms automated smart static targets
2.      Small arms automated smart mobile targets
3.      6.5mm, .260 Bolt/Gas Precision Rifles
4.      Simulation
5.      Integrated optics
6.      Small arms self-coaching and data tracking applications

Technology area number 3 is being requested for competition only with the Marine Corps Shooting Teams. (wink, wink, nudge, nudge)

The Marksmanship Technology Demonstration is not a tradeshow.  During the two day demonstration, a team of assessors will collect data on system performance and will provide feedback on their observations of the technologies presented.  Following the demonstration, promising technologies may be selected for extended user evaluations.

1. Automated Smart Static Target Systems

The Marine Corps is interested in a target system that can be installed on current standard Known/Unknown-Distance Ranges and equipment that provide immediate, accurate shot to shot feedback to shooters and coaches on the firing line. The Marine Corps is interested in target systems that meet the following specifications:
•· Able to accept variety of targets (i.e. CMP/NRA, IDPA, USPSA, Action)
•· Plot shots within a 2mm of accuracy, and capture the shot in a 6’x6′ window
•· Able to take in excess of 10,000 5.56mm impacts before requiring maintenance
•· Networked to record each shot and display on tablet/computer located on firing line
•· Able to support a 50 target frontage without interference from adjacent targets
•· Able to run off of shore or battery power for a minimum of 12 hours at full use. Optimal battery life in excess of 24 hours.
•· Function in all weather conditions (i.e. rain, snow, mist, fog)
•· System must be able to integrate with existing Marine Corps infrastructure, in order to ensure the original system may be used as a backup
•· Centralized data collection system

* Tablet/PDA

Automated target systems should come with tablets or communicate with personal electronic devices via website or App. The Marine Corps is interested in target systems that provide a tablet/PDA with the specifications of one or more of the following items:

Required Characteristics
•· Screen size shall be a minimum of 4 inches wide and 6 inches long
•· Man portable
•· Contain a rechargeable/removable battery
•· Will be visible in direct sunlight.
•· Capable of screen use with gloves.
•· Be contained in a replaceable shock and water resistant case.
•· Able to be connected with WiFi, Bluetooth, and with USB type cables.
•· Must meet MIL-STD 810G environmental/durability requirements

Desired Characteristics
•· Battery life in excess of 12 hours during continuous use with all functions enabled. Prefer 24 hours that function in weather temperatures from 0 degrees Fahrenheit to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
•· Display capable of being backlit for night use.
•· Able to be utilized in all weather conditions with wet hands and gloves.
•· Self-supported with provided viewing angles from 15 degrees to 90 degrees.
•· Drop resistant to 6 meters
•· Water proof (IP66K rating)

2. Autonomous / Smart Mobile Target Systems

The Marine Corps is interested in a target system that is a mobile, man sized 3-dimensional target that provides instant feedback to shooter and coach on a firing line. The Marine Corps is interested in a target system that meets the following specifications:
•· A 3-dimensional man-sized target
•· Able to move in any direction at variable /programmable speeds (2.5-10 mph)
•· Provides accurate, immediate shot location detection as well as a means to provide shot feedback to shooters and coaches at the shooter’s position.
•· A perimeter sensor system that could accurately depict misses around the target (6’x6′ example) that could be transmitted to a display located at the firing point for immediate coaching/shooter feedback.
•· The target should react (as programmed) to hits or misses.
•· The target could communicate with adjacent targets (Bluetooth example) and respond to each other to hits and misses (as programmed).
•· Ability to place two target types on one platform that could be “presented” to the shooter (hostile/non hostile example) as programmed.
•· The target could generate heat for thermal optics.
•· Able to take in excess of 10,000 300/7.62/5.56 mm round impacts before requiring maintenance
•· Maintenance cycle that needs to take in consideration hours/days of training required to support up to 22,000 shooters a year.
•· 10 hours sustained use before maintenance/recharging
•· Centralized data collection system
•· Ricochet resistant encapsulation

* Tablet/PDA

Automated target systems should come with tablets or communicate with personal electronic devices via website or app. The Marine Corps is interested in systems that meet the specifications of one or more of the following items:

Required Characteristics
•· Screen size shall be a minimum of 4 inches wide and 6 inches long
•· Man portable
•· Contain a rechargeable/removable battery
•· Will be visible in direct sunlight.
•· Capable of screen use with gloves.
•· Be contained in a replaceable shock and water resistant case.
•· Able to be connected with WiFi, Bluetooth, and with USB type cables.
•· Must meet MIL-STD 810G environmental/durability requirements

Desired Characteristics
•· Battery life in excess of 12 hours during continuous use with all functions enabled. Prefer 24 hours that function in weather temperatures from 0 degrees Fahrenheit to 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
•· Display capable of being backlit for night use.
•· Able to be utilized in all weather conditions with wet hands and gloves.
•· Self-supported with provided viewing angles from 15 degrees to 90 degrees.
•· Drop resistant to 6 meters
•· Water proof (IP66K rating)

3. 6.5mm, .260 Bolt/Gas Precision Rifles

The Marine Corps Shooting Team is interested in rifles that incorporate technologies that are applicable to national and international competition. The Marine Corps Shooting Team is interested in a rifle that is guided by the following specific requirements:

Required Characteristics
•· Bolt Action Rifle
o Chambered in .260 or 6.5 Creedmoor
o Minimum of .7 MOA accuracy
o 22 to 26 inch barrel, 1:8 twist
o Chassis system or stock with ability to adjust length of pull, cheek height, etc.
o Picatinny or M-LOK mounts for bipod
o Short Action
o Adjustable trigger pull or fixed match-grade trigger 1.5 lbs pull weight, 1 or 2 stage
o Able to take 5 or 10 round magazines
o Action must have reinforced bolt stop

•· Gas Precision Rifle
o Chambered in .260 or 6.5 Creedmoor
o Minimum of 1 MOA accuracy
o 18-24 inch barrel, 1:8 twist
o Adjustable gas system
o M-LOK or Picatinny free floated rail system
o Adjustable trigger pull or fixed match-grade trigger 1.5 lbs pull weight, 1 or 2 stage

Desired Characteristics

•· Bolt Action Rifle
o Action has 2 lug with 90 degree throw, or 3 lug with 60-75 degree throw.
•· Gas Precision Rifle
o Adjustable Mass/Recoil Management system

4. Simulation

The Marine Corps is interested in simulated range and training environments which incorporate technologies that are applicable to current and future battlefields. The Marine Corps is interested in simulations that are guided by the following specific requirements:

Required Characteristics
•· Wireless Augmented Reality (AR) ready, 3D/4D environment
•· System must link users to allow Marines to interact within virtual world from any location
•· Intuitive controls that Marine operators can utilize with little training
•· Able to quickly design and implement maps/environments at operator level for training, i.e. towns, cities, weather conditions, terrain.
•· Able to accurately simulate friendly/enemy personnel, ground vehicles, ships, aircraft.
•· Intuitive AI to allow for both flexible and scripted scenarios. Must react realistically to user inputs, i.e. user firing at enemy.
•· System must be able to accurately simulate ballistics of current inventory of ammunition utilized in service weapons, i.e. M855, M855A1, AA11, A363, A483 etc.
•· Train shooters in basic and advanced marksmanship principals.
•· Train shooters in target engagements and transition drills.
•· Must provide threat and target discrimination training.
•· 360 degree threat / Non-threat training scenarios.
•· Facility must be able to be retrofit into current Marine Corps facilities or be custom designed.
•· Laser shot detection should be within the 780NM range.
•· Setup shall take no longer than 7 days
•· Tear down shall take no longer than 7 days

Desired Characteristics
•· Projectors and monitors have the ability to mount in multiple locations (floor, ceiling or walls)
•· Customizable scenarios to enable the Marine Corps to adjust training with new mission requirements, as well as meet current TTP’s, METL’s, and POI’s.
•· Aid in cognitive and ocular development, situational awareness, and target identification.
•· Retain the ability to train a shooter in decision fidelity, perceptual acuity and situational awareness.
•· Have the ability to control ambient lighting to increase target clarity.
•· Incorporate weight training to induce stress, physical fatigue and mental fatigue.
•· Marine must be able to utilize assigned service weapon (i.e. M4, M16, IAR, M9, etc.) through a ‘drop kit’ or similar means to effect the simulation by cycling his weapon system with 75% realistic recoil.
•· 4D Virtual Reality: Marine can move on a pad 360 degrees and will move virtual character. All movement of weapon and body are accurately depicted within simulation via motion capture, cameras or like systems. Complete immersion.

5. Integrated Optics

The Marine Corps is interested in optics that incorporates technologies that are applicable to current and future battlefields. The Marine Corps is interested in upgrades that meet the specifications of the following items:

Required Characteristics
•· Magnification from 0/1-8 power to PID threats (presence of weapon) out to 600M, and engage threats in close proximity
•· Must possess large and forgiving eye box and extended eye relief
•· Included ambidextrous capable feature to rapidly adjust magnification with non-firing hand
•· Electronic fire control system that diagnosis range, weather, elevation, and lead for a moving target within 0.5 seconds (objective), 1 second (threshold) and places an accurate “aim point dot” or appropriate “aim point reference” for the shooter to place on the target and engage.
•o Target data to include range, and direction (degrees/mils) is displayed within the objective lens for shooter to observe.
•o Bluetooth or WIFI capability to link and communicate with tablets, and communication suites found at the squad and platoon level.
•· Etched/mechanical reticle feature for engaging moving threats out to 150M and rapid ranging feature that accounts for average width of human head and of shoulders as back up for system failure or battery loss.
•· Compatible with clip-on current night vision or thermal imaging devices (e.g. PVS-24A, PAS-27, etc.)
•· Low profile elevation turret or cap – turrets locking or capped to prevent inadvertent loss of zero in combat conditions
•· Scope must return to zero after removal
•· Center of reticle must have daylight bright illuminated dot for close quarter use at 0/1 power.
•· Should meet MIL-STD 810G environmental/durability requirements

Desired Characteristics
•· Scalable and modular to accept future digital feature set and new reticles
•· Potential low end setting as red dot sight (RDS)
•· Optimized for mounting height over rail at 1.54-1.93″
•· Squad level networking and target designation capability
•· Visually displayed point of impact cue (drawing information from laser rangefinder and ballistic solvers, integral and/or external)

6. Small arms self-coaching and data tracking applications

The Marine Corps is interested in applications and devices able to coach Marines in marksmanship. These tools should allow Marines to track ability throughout their career, while enabling the USMC trained coaches a tool to aid in instruction. The Marine Corps is interested in products that meet the specifications of one or more of the following items:

Required Characteristics
•· Portable in design
•· Contain a removable battery
•· Able to analyze errors in application of fundamentals of marksmanship
•· Wireless operation via Bluetooth or WIFI
•· Battery life a minimum of 4 hours
•· Works during dry fire, simulator, and live fire training.
•· Able to diagnose marksmanship errors via attachment or drop in kit that wirelessly reports to user/coach.
•· Allow user/coach/target system to make entries on a ‘digital data-book’ that records each shot.
•· Product provided with storage case and charger.
•· Must meet MIL-STD 810G environmental/durability requirements
•· Provides predictive analytics to judge shooters performance against known standards.
•· Ability to be used in dry and live fire
•· Provide analysis of data from known standards

Desired Characteristics
•· Battery life in excess of 12 hours during continuous use with all functions enabled. Prefer 24 hours.
•· Application should be able to be used on multiple OS (android or Macintosh)
•· Capable of being connected to wireless enabled devices via blue tooth connection
•· Able to be utilized in all weather conditions
•· Drop resistant to 6 meters
•· Water proof (IP66K rating)

Responses are requested no later than 20 August 2018.

A list of selected companies will be posted to www.trngcmd.marines.mil/MarksmanshipTechDemo in August.

Interested parties shouod visit www.fbo.gov for full details.

Harvested HMMWV Parts Will Save Corps Millions, Increase Survivability of JLTV

Thursday, July 26th, 2018

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —

A harvesting effort by Program Executive Officer Land Systems and Marine Corps Systems Command could save the Corps millions and make one of its newest vehicles more survivable.

The Gunner’s Protection Kit, managed by Infantry Weapons within MCSC’s Portfolio Manager Ground Combat Equipment Systems, is currently installed on High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles. As a cost-savings measure, the kits will be removed from HMMWVs and installed on Joint Light Tactical Vehicles as they are fielded to the fleet next year. Using harvested parts instead of buying new potentially saves the Corps more than $100 million.

Logisticians and equipment specialists from Marine Corps Systems Command and Program Executive Officer Land Systems install a Marine Corps Transparent Armor Gun Shield on a Joint Light Tactical Vehicle May 1. The installation is part of a cost-savings plan to harvest Gunner’s Protection Kits and other equipment from older High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles and increase the JLTV’s survivability. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Kristen Murphy)

“The harvesting strategy was developed by the JLTV Joint Program Office in 2012 as part of our efforts to meet affordability metrics for the program,” said Andy Rodgers, program manager for Light Tactical Vehicles in Program Executive Officer Land Systems. “Our collaboration with [Marine Corps Systems Command’s] Program Manager Infantry Weapons is key to that strategy.”

In the spring, logisticians and other program personnel from Infantry Weapons conducted a Proof of Principle, or PoP, going step by step through the process of removing a Marine Corps Transparent Armor Gun Shield—part of the GPK family of systems—from a HMMWV and placing it on a JLTV. The MCTAGS will be installed on the Heavy Guns Carrier JLTV variant.

Marines from 1st Battalion, 7th Marines prepare to load Joint Light Tactical Vehicles onto Landing Craft Utility boats in preparation for a JLTV Multiservice Operational Test and Evaluation amphibious landing March 2, at Camp Pendleton, California. As part of a cost-savings plan, the Marine Corps will harvest Gunner’s Protection Kits and other equipment from older High Mobility Multipurpose Wheeled Vehicles and install them on JLTVs to increase the new vehicles’ survivability. (U.S. Marine Corps courtesy photo)

The PoP will help the program office develop, verify and publish a modification instruction to guide the Corps through the installation process, said Kevin Marion, a logistics management specialist in Infantry Weapons.

“The PoP was successful,” Marion said. “We started with existing [instruction] manuals for the MCTAGS, and then added steps for putting it on the new vehicle. In addition to documenting the steps, it also gave us a chance to identify any parts that can’t be reused because the degree of serviceability is questionable.”

The JLTV program office has completed similar PoP efforts with the Improved TOW GPK, or I-TGPK, which will be installed on the Close Combat Weapons Carrier variant of the JLTV. The CCWC can be armed with TOW—tube-launched, optically tracked, wire-guided—missiles.

The JLTV is an Army-led light tactical vehicle program. It will partially replace the Army and Marine Corps HMMWV fleet, providing a more survivable vehicle, and closing an existing gap in payload, performance and protection. The JLTV comes in four variants with payloads ranging from 3,500 to 5,100 pounds of cargo, and can go more than 70 miles per hour as well as traverse over arduous terrain.

Although only two variants will be equipped with the MCTAGS or I-TGPK, all JLTVs will contain harvested radios, antennas and other communications equipment from HMMWVs.

“It’s our responsibility as MCSC to be good stewards of taxpayer money, so if we have equipment that is in good condition, we should go ahead and use it,” Marion said.

An advantage to Marines is the tactics, techniques and procedures will remain largely unchanged for the harvested equipment, so they already know how to operate it, Rodgers said.

The HMMWVs will be demilitarized and traded through the Equipment Exchange Program. This program enables the organization to work with commercial vendors who can sell or use the vehicles as they see fit.

“The exchange program is no cost to the government, and no money changes hands,” Rodgers said. “In exchange, the vendor buys equipment we may need like MCTAG covers or ring mounts for the JLTV, and they ship it wherever we need it.”

Once vehicle fielding begins next year, Marine Corps field service representatives will execute the harvesting plan for the units that receive them, Rodgers said. This is part of the program’s “total package fielding” plan.

“As we field the JLTV, we’ll collect the HMMWV, harvest the parts, install them and then return the new vehicles [to the units],” Rodgers said.

Fielding for the JLTV will begin in spring 2019 to the Marine Corps School of Infantry-West at Camp Pendleton, California; School of Infantry-East at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina; The Basic School at Marine Corps Base Quantico, Virginia; and Motor Transport Maintenance Instructional Company at Camp Johnson, North Carolina. Fielding to the operating forces will begin in the summer of 2019. In all, the Army plans to purchase 49,000 JLTVs and the Marine Corps will purchase 9,091.

By Monique Randolph, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

USMC Small Arms Modernization Update

Thursday, May 10th, 2018

During NDIA’s Annual Armaments Meeting, Lt Col Christopher Woodburn (USMC, Ret), the Deputy, Maneuver Branch, Capabilities Development Directorate, discussed Marine Corps modernization efforts. He began by reiterating that Commandant of the Marine Corps, Gen Robert Neller’s priority remains the Infantry regarding small arms.

U.S. Marines with 3rd Battalion 8th Marine Regiment fire the M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle during a live-fire weapons exercise at range F-18 on Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in 2017. (Lance Cpl. Michaela R. Gregory/ Marine Corps)

Next, he mentioned the recent M27 contract and clarified that the M27 Infantry Automatics Rifle would be fielded to the entire Rifle Platoon from the Platoon Commander on down. Fielding will begin in FY18 and continue through FY20.

The M4s displaced by the M27 fielding will be used to replace remaining M16A4s in the Ground Combat Element.

Additionally, he explained that the M38 Designated Marksman Rifle variant of the M27 was a Squad element weapon and that the Squad leader would assign it to his best marksman. Marines have also begun receiving the Squad Range Finder to improve target acquisition and engagement.

Woodburn stated that the Marines continue to evaluate suppressors for use with the M27 and M4 as well as Medium Machine Guns.

Next year, the Marine Corps will begin fielding the M320A1 40mm Grenade Launcher as a replacement for the M203. It will be used in standalone mode only, and not mounted to the IAR.

The Marine Corps has also adopted the Mk 13 Mod 7, sniper rifle which has been used for many years by USSOCOM. The Marines consider it an interim capability until they can field the Advanced Sniper Rifle in 7.62mm, 300 and 348 Norma Mag in the early 20s. They will also begin to see the 84mm M3E1 Carl Gustaf. The Marines will leverage the seven different rounds SOCOM has developed for the recoilless rifle.

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In other joint projects with SOCOM, the Marines continue their support of the 338 NM Lightweight Medium Machine Gun. They are also participating in the Army-led development of the Next Generation Squad Automatic Rifle.

Woodburn finished up by relating that the Marine Corps will begin fielding of the Modular Handgun System in FY19 to replace their legacy pistols.

M27 Accessories Evaluated

Saturday, April 21st, 2018

I’ve been sitting on this photo for awhile, but now that it has made it out into the wild, I figure it’s ok to share.

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I’m told it was taken at Quantico Marine Corps Base at Weapons Training Bn, and I’ve had a copy of the photo for several months.

The three weapons were under evaluation, pursuant to the impending M27 fielding. You’ll also note a few BE Meyers’ MAWLs and Geissele accessories such as the Upper Receiver Group – Improved and High Speed Selector Switch as well as B5 Systems stocks. That’s not to mention the optics. The URG-I was looked at as an alternative to fielding additional M27s, but quickly dropped as the Marine Corps has laid a solid path forward.

However, let me be very clear about this. A lot of things have been looked at, but the M27 fielding is under such close scrutiny that no changes will be made to the additional weapons, expected to be fielded later this year. Any changes will come down the road.

No, The Marines Haven’t Issued A Contract For Additional M27s

Thursday, February 22nd, 2018

I keep getting asked if the USMC has let a contract for additional M27 Infantry Automatic Rifles. Apparently, a few weeks ago a gun blog called Guns America reported that the Marine Corps had awarded Heckler & Koch a contract for additional M27s. The problem is, it’s untrue.

The author’s reasoning was that the “protest period” was over and consequently, a contract had been let. Once again, this isn’t true. For some reason, H&K representative Bill Dermody agreed with the interviewer during a video taken during SHOT Show by Guns America, giving further credence to the story.

Last Summer, Marine Corps Systems Command issued a pre-solicitation intent to solicit and negotiate with Heckler & Koch (H&K), for up to 50,814 M27 Infantry Automatice Rifles (IAR)Since then, they’ve publicly said and done nothing. There hasn’t been a “protest period” because there hasn’t been a contract award issued by the Marines.

Unfortunately, other websites who didn’t know what they were talking about, picked up the story and shared it.

Sure, the Marine Corps is interested in purchasing additional M27s to outfit their Infantry Forces and H&K would love the business, but the reality is that it hasn’t happened. At least, yet. The Commandant of the Marine Corps has publicly stated his desire to do so and I know the Marines are working toward that end, but they’ve still got some things to work out.

I promise you; as soon as I can tell you it has happened, I will.

USMC Fields M38 Squad Designated Marksman Rifle

Tuesday, December 26th, 2017

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Back in May we told you that the US Marine Corps planned to field M27 Infantry Automatic Rifles Equipped with 3-9x scopes as Squad Designated Marksman Rifles. Apparently, work began not long after and units are now equipped with the rifle, designated as the M38. The Marines adopted the 5.56mm M27 in 2011 to replace the M249 Squad Automatic Weapon in the infantry squad. The M27 is manufactured by Heckler & Koch and is based on the HK416.

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The optic actually used has been identified as the Leupold TS-30A2 Mark 4 MR/T 2.5-8x36mm with a tuned Mk262 77gr turret. Interestingly, the Marines are supposed to transition to the M855A1 round this year.

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In these photos, Marines with 3rd Battalion 8th Marine Regiment fire the M38 Squad Designated Marksmanship Rifle during a live-fire weapons exercise at range F-18 on Camp Lejeune, NC, Dec. 8, 2017. Photos by LCpl Michaela R. Gregory.

Marine Corps Fields “Game Changer” Biometric Data Collection System

Thursday, December 14th, 2017

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. — In September, Marine Corps Systems Command completed fielding a new biometrics system to help deployed Marines identify and track the movement of individuals encountered on the battlefield, conduct entry control point operations, and determine who is a friend or foe.

Identity Dominance System-Marine Corps, or IDS-MC, is a simple and effective biometric data collection, matching, and transaction management system that is composed of a handheld device, known as the Secure Electronic Enrollment Kit, and a laptop computer with specialized biometric collection sensors and a badge printer.

IDS-MC replaces the Biometric Enrollment and Screening Device to assist with detainee management and questioning, base access, counterintelligence screening, border control and law enforcement operations. Unlike the BESD, IDS-MC’s transactional data management capability conveniently collects, shares, matches and stores identity information immediately, allowing the user to connect to the Tactical Data Network, manage and submit collected data and receive responses and feedback on submissions. This improves on the legacy system, which could take days to download data via a CD or DVD, and then Marines had to transmit that vital identity information from a separately connected computing system. This process was not only logistically cumbersome, but the latency in data submission and response receipt created force protection mission challenges for the Marine.

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Marines conduct a field user evaluation for the Identity Dominance System-Marine Corps, or IDS-MC, in Dahlgren, Virginia. In September, Marine Corps Systems Command completed fielding of the IDS-MC, which is a new biometrics system to help deployed Marines identify and track the movement of individuals encountered on the battlefield, conduct entry control point operations, and determine who is a friend or foe.

“The IDS-MC is more convenient because it connects directly to the Marine Corps’ Tactical Data Network, allowing Marines to share data and submit biometrics and receive the responses effortlessly,” said Sarah Swift, Identity Operations Team lead for Biometrics and Forensics Systems at MCSC.

To develop the IDS-MC, the Identity Operations Team identified a need for a portable, easy-to-use system via feedback from Marines in the fleet. The system was created to directly address the specific needs of Marine Expeditionary Forces in a contested environment.

Using IDS-MC, Marines collect biometric data by capturing a person of interest’s fingerprints, iris and face images. That data can then be matched with pre-existing information onboard the system, either on a BEWL or other lists, such as an access control list used for base force protection. The IDS-MC also has the capability to capture location, biographical and any other reference data that may be useful to an intelligence analyst now or in the future.

The IDS-MC user submits biometric information to the Department of Defense’s Automated Biometric Identification System authoritative database via a web portal, allowing data to be shared across the Biometrics enterprise, and also aiding in the creation of the DoD extensive Biometric-Enabled Watch List, or BEWL. The BEWL contains an ongoing collection of biometric intelligence that helps users determine what actions to take immediately when they encounter a person of interest. Additionally, the Marine Corps Intelligence Agency Identity Intelligence Analytical Cell, or MCIA I2AC, reviews the IDS-MC user’s biometrics submissions and other collected biographical and reference data, and provides direct support to the submitting Marines, providing them analysis reports and intelligence products for potential Persons of Interest.

“The BEWL helps Marines match nefarious people they might encounter anywhere in the world to the ones listed in the database,” said Swift. “We support Marines by providing them the most up to date BEWL, and then they can collect a person’s biometrics. If it shows up in the system as a match, they’ll be notified with a pop-up on the device.”

“All of this provides the Marine Air-Ground Task Force with the ability to rapidly and efficiently identify people encountered in the battle space in support of targeting, military intelligence, law enforcement operations and force protection,” said Maj. Keystella Mitchell, project officer for IDS-MC.

In addition to identifying known threats, the system also collects information on potential future threats and stores it for future reference. If an individual is a match in the system, Marines are able to immediately receive that information and use it to inform on-the-spot decisions.

“It can be difficult to determine who the enemy is because they truly blend in with their surroundings,” said Mitchell. “The IDS-MC is a game changer and force multiplier as a connected system for the commander on the ground because they can identify the threat and take action much quicker than before.”

In addition to the planned fielding of the IDS-MC system, an urgent system quantity shortfall was identified by the Special Purpose Marine Air-Ground Task Force and Marine Corps Forces Central Command customers. This required an unplanned increase in the number of production assets which required a fielding re-prioritization strategy, additional rapid procurement and integration. The Identity Operations Team adapted its strategy, and within two months of validating the requirement, it fielded the additional systems.

The fielding of the IDS-MC system has led to a 154 percent increase in the biometric collections submitted to MCIA I2AC and resulted in 11 watch list hits in just the first month of fielding.

The IDS-MC is managed by the Identity Operations Team which falls under Command Element Systems at MCSC.

By Kaitlin Kelly, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication

Happy Birthday Marines!

Friday, November 10th, 2017

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The story goes that by 1918, the US Marines were fully employed putting foot to Central Power ass, but when the Germans saw how hard the Devil Dogs partied on their birthday, they promptly surrendered the next morning. That’s right, the service that was founded in a Tavern is why we celebrate Armistice Day on 11 November.

Thanks for keeping the world safe Marines!