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Archive for the ‘Digitization’ Category

Revision Military Showcases Capabilities

Thursday, January 29th, 2015

Revision Military is so much more than eyepro. Over the past several years they’ve purchased a company or three and expanded their capabilities to provide a holistic soldier protection solution. Although they have been involved in USSOCOM’s TALOS program, it was more a conduit to showcase what they’ve done than a driver of innovation. They were already well on their own path when former Commander, USSOCOM, ADM McRaven called on industry to develop an “ironman” suit.

Revision has been way out in front of everyone else bringing this all in house. Hopefully, their hard work will be rewarded.

www.revisionmilitary.com

SHOT Show – TNVC / Unity Tactical

Friday, January 23rd, 2015

the Programmable Switch is a new collaboration between Unity Tactical and TNVC. The dual pressure switch design can be configured independently for momentary or constant on. It will come with Steiner, Insight, SureFire, etc leads.

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The next item is a GoPro mount for binocular NVGs that uses the Wilcox prism lens from the Helmet Mission Recording System.

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Finally, Unity Tactical has introduced Atom slide for Gen 4 GLOCKS.

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www.tnvc.com

GIGN

Saturday, January 10th, 2015

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I ran across this on Facebook where it came from imgur. Fancy. Amazing how GIGN is equipped.

h/t spartan117gw

Kopis Mobile – Mapping & Multimedia Radio Infrastructure System (MMRIS)

Tuesday, December 30th, 2014

Click to view .pdf
MMRIS

Kopis Mobile and Tactical Electronics Corporation have collaborated to create MMRIS – the Mapping & Multimedia Radio Infrastructure System. MMRIS is a new system designed to allow end-users to remotely operate Icom radios using an Android cellular phone or tablet. Functionality includes sending text and photo messages and monitoring team radio locations using Icom narrowband radios as the communications link. For more information contact mmris@tacel.com. Click the image above to view a product .pdf.

Black Diamond Advanced Technology – Windows or Android, APEx Don’t Care

Friday, December 19th, 2014

If you’re a JTAC, check this out.

bdatech.com

Meet The Brains Of The RIANOV Eagle from Precision Targeting

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

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This tiny wafer of a chip is the actual ballistic computer used in Precision Targeting’s RIANOV Eagle which we originally showed you during SOFIC. It’s built as an OEM product that can be supplied to other manufacturers.

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The actual RIANOV Eagle, seen above, is a weapon mounted (1913 compatible) ballistic computer. It offers a fully compensated ballistic solution monitoring environmental conditions and weapon system orientation (slope and cant) to provide a firing solution. The military version is interoperable with the STORM, Rulr and RAPTOR.

www.rianov.com

Tac Apps – Range Rings: New Map-Based Ballistics Calculator from Kopis Mobile

Tuesday, November 18th, 2014

Range Rings by Kopis Mobile is meant to be used when a shooter needs to quickly determine ballistics solutions in a number of directions, for multiple landmarks, instantaneously. This gives the shooter a quick mental reference as he moves between shots quickly. Other ballistics apps only provide a single shot solution.

Range Rings

When you start the app, your location is found and ballistics solutions are calculated based on the most recent weapon and weather information. The solutions, in the form of distance and drop, are then displayed in rings overlaid on a map of the immediate area.

You can add and edit your weapons configurations via the Weapons tab.

Weather (wind speed and direction, temperature, humidity) is automatically downloaded and used in the calculations, or edited manually on the Weather tab.

The appearance of the rings, including their units, color, spacing, and distance covered is all managed on the Settings tab.

Range Rings is available for iOS at itunes.apple.com/us/app/range-rings.

Kopis Mobile welcomes your feedback about additional features or problems. More information about Kopis Mobile can be found at www.KopisMobile.com.

TACP-Modernization

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

This Air Force News Service story offers a good update on the Tactical Air Control Party – Modernization effort.

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(Photo: Tactical air control party specialists with the 169th Air Support Operations Squadron survey an enemy-controlled landing zone before calling in close-air support Aug. 14, 2014, at Operation Northern Strike in Grayling Air Gunnery Range, Grayling, Mich. Northern Strike was a 3-week exercise that demonstrated the combined power of joint and multinational air and ground forces. TACPs with the Air National Guard’s 169th ASOS from Peoria, Ill., and more than 5,000 other armed forces members from 12 states and two coalition nations participated in the combat training. SSgt Lealan Buehrer, Air National Guard)

HANSCOM AIR FORCE BASE, Mass. (AFNS) — Embedded deep within an Army maneuver unit lies an Airman. Charged with orchestrating critical close-air support, it’s often the effort of this combat maestro that means the difference between life and death on the battlefield – this specialist is known as a tactical air control party, or TACP for short.

However, the success of close air support doesn’t depend on these Airmen alone, but also the equipment and communication tools they use.

TACP-Modernization, an Air Force Life Cycle Management Center-owned program, is the driving force responsible for acquiring and equipping battlefield Airmen with such tools. This technology has the capability to interface with ground forces, CAS aircraft, UHF satellites, remotely piloted aircraft and command and control intelligence, surveillance and reconnaissance platforms.

To meet the needs of a modern day ground and cyber battlefield, the 46-member TACP-M team focuses on reducing reliance on voice transmission and replacing analog equipment with the latest data link and streaming video technology. They do this by addressing three main areas — mounted, dismounted equipment and communication software.

Mounted and mobile

“Mounted mobile communication is a top requirements priority for us,” said Rob Bubello, the Battlespace Communications Branch chief and TACP-M program manager.

TACPs, who advise ground commanders on employing airpower and control aircraft to put bombs on target, utilize two different types of mounted equipment: fixed and mobile.

The mounted, fixed element integrates computer and communications equipment into re-locatable vehicle, rack or transit case-mounted systems for use in tactical operation centers and air support operation centers. This includes the Humvee-mounted ASOC Gateway, Gateway Lite, as well as Dismounted Communication Packages known as DCPs.

Today, TACP-M’s sights are set on producing the next generation of on-the-move technology — Mobile Communication Systems or MCSs.

“The MCS offers a much more robust C2 capability since it provides four channels of voice or data as well as video streaming,” said Maj. Jason Huff, MCS program manager. “In addition, the system is tailored to the vehicle and allows for more room within, which provides easy access to the equipment and more importantly, it offers easier egress access allowing members to exit the vehicle in an emergency.”

The mounted, mobile element, which is very similar to its fixed counterpart, integrates hardware into mobile tactical vehicles employed by the Army and provides on-the-move voice and data capabilities. To date, the program office has fielded 45 communication pallets, which are integrated onto Stryker vehicles that operate within the U.S.’s area of responsibility.

“Another large requirement for us includes DCPs,” Bubello said. “It’s essentially a docking kit, which allows you to combine your existing equipment.”

DCPs, considered part of the mounted equipment component, are comprised of existing hardware such as computers, keypad displays, headsets and antennas. Those items are then coupled with equipment found in air support and tactical operation centers.

Since 2007, TACP-M has managed to acquire and equip 224 Humvees and 45 Strykers with TACP communication systems and plans on integrating 400 more systems into vehicles over the next five to 10 years. They have also fielded 17 operation center Gateways, four Gateway Lights and procured 144 DCPs to date.

Essentially, all these components help modernize digital voice and data communications, allowing for machine-to-machine interface and ultimately reducing what is commonly known to warfighters as “the kill chain.”

Dismounted operations

However, it isn’t solely mounted equipment that TACPs use in the field; therefore, the program team also focuses on acquiring state-of-the-art dismounted technology as well.

For example, multiband man-pack radios began fielding in late 2010, followed by small wearable computers in 2011. Within the same year, pocket laser range finders, handheld laser markers and mini thermal monoculars also entered field testing. Later in 2013, equipment such as full motion video receivers and TOC light/heavy computers found their way onto the battlefield.

Master Sgt. Jeff Kennedy, a battlefield Airman who’s currently assigned to the Hanscom AFB program office, is one of approximately 2,000 TACPs in the Air Force; he and others like him know all too well the importance of having the latest technology.

“It is crucial to have the most up-to-date tools,” said Kennedy, looking back on a recent tour in Afghanistan. “Being able to quickly and efficiently communicate out there is a life or death situation.”

According to the TACP, it’s not only the efficiency of the equipment that has an impact, but also the size and weight. “We have a saying … things should be smaller, lighter, faster,” Kennedy said. “Ounces equal pounds, pounds equal pain. It’s something the program team takes into consideration when procuring new equipment.”

With this in mind, TACP-M moves toward acquiring more efficient pieces of dismounted equipment.

To instance, the team recently introduced 202 additional Soldier ISR Receivers, or SIRs, that will help bring full motion video capability to dismounted TACPs like Kennedy.

In addition, small wearable computers are being replaced by TACP computer kits, which are comprised of an integrated computer, vest and cable systems.

“We’re building cheaper, more specialized kits,” Bubello said. “In this case, a larger, ruggedized, tactical body-worn computer system with simpler message-focused software is the direction we’re headed. It will ultimately provide the operator the means to accomplish their task at a much faster and efficient pace.”

Staying connected

The final piece of the puzzle, and the team’s third area of focus, is close air support system software, commonly referred to as CASS.

The purpose of CASS is simple – to develop and sustain a common software application, one that establishes a baseline across all TACP systems.

“What’s the point of having high-tech gear if we have outdated software?” Kennedy said.

The Air Force currently uses CASS version 1.4.4, but Rockwell Collins, acting on a recently awarded contract will produce version 1.4.5 by October. It was a selection that led to a 60 percent savings for the service from the previous contract.

With CASS playing a substantial role in TACP-Modernization, the Air Force is optimistic that the new version will be fielded in fiscal year 2015.

So what’s to be expected? A software version that improves TACP mission effectiveness via Human Machine Interface, data that can be exchanged between dissimilar air and ground platforms and a dismounted simplified interface environment for battlefield Airmen. The 1.4.5 version will also focus on software applications for the dismounted operator as well as a more complex scale software capability found in air operation centers.

On the ground, TACPs are a safety net for Soldiers, their frontline mission is essential. Through the use of CASS, mounted and dismounted equipment, TACP-M ties it all together by balancing the operators’ present day needs with tomorrow’s modernization.

MDM – Ameripack – Rack Mount Solutions

Thursday, September 25th, 2014

In addition to their other injection molded transit cases, Ameripack also offers the Excalibur series of transit shock rack mounted solutions which are shock tested to 200 lbs.

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Most of this work is OEM production to spec, such as this installation for Themis. These rotational molded cases open at both ends and are built to Mil-Spec. For example, they offer pressure relief valves, humidity indicators, rack mid rails, and optional lid chillers.

Available in Black, tan and OD Green.

www.ameripack.com

MDM – Owl Computing Technologies

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

Owl Computing Technologies was created in 1998 to offer One-Way Transfer Links (OWL). Their latest implementation is their dual diode technology.

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They use a hardened security infrastructure (card) to share data one-way, across domains, for example, low-side to high-side. It takes the old, copy to external disc, air gap, out of the equation, lowering risk to unauthorized disclosure of data via errant USB thumb drives. It also makes for faster access to data from different networks for analysis and fusion.

At the Soldier level, it ensures only certain information to be shared via a network such as heart rate monitor telemetry, GPS data or video. Other data streams could be shared via other networks.

www.owlcti.com