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Archive for the ‘Packs’ Category

Atlas 46 – Legacy A3 Pack

Tuesday, October 17th, 2017

This makes me SO happy. John Carver’s company, Atlas 46, has introduced their Legacy A3 Pack, a classic design, that goes back decades.

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Features:
– Patriot made 1000D abrasion resistant Cordura® nylon
– Heavy Duty #10 YKK® zippers with dual sliders on main compartments
– Hydration compatible, hydration bladder NOT included
– Reinforced carry handle capable of heavy carrying
– Ergonomic shoulder design enables fuller range of motion and arm swing
– Removable/adjustable sternum strap
– Fully padded back panel for comfort
– Stitched with bonded nylon thread
– Fully adjustable/removable padded waist strap
– 28″ removable sleeping bag/tool roll tie down straps
– 16″ removable top cargo straps
– Side retention straps with side release buckles
– As long as America is the land of the free this product is guaranteed for life
– Made in the greatest country in the world

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Offered in Black, Coyote or MultiCam (slight upcharge).

www.atlas46.com

Sneak Peek – Velocity Systems Arc’teryx Assault Pack Medical Inserts

Tuesday, October 10th, 2017

Although the set of inserts for the Arc’teryx LEAF Assault Pack won’t be released until SHOT Show 2018, they made a soft debut last night at the Arc’teryx LEAF event in Washington DC.


Look for Assault 30 & 45 variants with grab and go features to take full advantage of the Assault Pack’s design.  

www.velsyst.com

Ask SSD – Help ID This Rifle Attachment

Sunday, September 17th, 2017

SSD Reader Luke sent us this message:

Hi SSD,

Need help identifying this rifle attachment. Have a 10k run and gun coming up and I’m looking for one of these for myself and my wife.

Here’s your chance to help put a follow SSD reader. What do you think it is?

DSEI 17 – Mystery Ranch ATM Pack

Friday, September 15th, 2017

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Mystery Ranch is located in the Edgar Brothers Booth and displayed the ATM (All Terrain Maneuver) Pack which was developed for a U.K. customer. It’s a two component system mounted to the Military Light Frame which is the same as the SOCOM Packs. In addition a to three small attached pouches there are three PALS accessory pouches along with an optional top flap.

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It offers about 70liters in the main pack with a E&E pack offering 25liters. The E&E pack is stored under the lid and will accommodate AN/PRC-117G along with appropriate kit.

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DSEI 17 – CTOMS Packs Systems

Thursday, September 14th, 2017

CTOMS has been working on pack systems.

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What started as a Medical Pack project for CTOMS has morphed into a more generic pack which can be configured for a wide variety of applications by the user. This is the third generation of the 2nd Line pack.

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One of the efficiencies CTOMS has realized while developing packs is that they’ve gone to a standard shoulder strap and belt systems. The suspension system seen here is for wear with armor. You’ll note the enhanced lumbar support to fill the gap at the lower back along with stabilizers along the side.

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Additionally, they’ve added the capacity for a waist belt which is modular. It features both PALS webbing as well as a gear loop. There are zippers down each side of the rear panel of the pack in order to attach mission panels. They are also working on a MALICE frame retrofit for this pack.

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The next pack is the Resolute. It’s a big, boxy pack which is intended for mounting on wall systems or on aircraft for quick access to medical gear.

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It will accept the new suspension system and mission panels.

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The Assault pack (seen below) has been updated to make it compatible with the rest of the line. For instance, they added Zippers at the rear panel to accommodate mission panels. The pack itself is a mission panel and can be connected to the other packs.

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They’ve also developed the Alert pack which is a smaller version of the Assault pack and can be seen to the right in the photo below. It too will function as a mission panel.

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The D2 Bag is a second generation fanny pack. They modified the shape to offer better usage of the space. It also has a full HDPE liner which can be removed and replaced with a modlable splint. You use the pack waist belt to turn this into a waist pack for down the hoist ops.

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CTOMS has introduced their version of the tried and true M-3 tri-fold combat lifesaver bag. They removed the flap, made it larger and added Velcro so you can add tags.

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Finally, CTOMS offers a wide variety of internal organizers which can be seen mounted throughout the article.

www.ctoms.ca

Stone Glacier Announces Ultralight Military/Tactical Pack

Monday, August 7th, 2017

Stone Glacier, an industry leader in ultralight backpacks, has developed and launched the R3 3300. A unique pack catered to the tactical and military markets based on Stone Glacier’s core principle of designing ultralight packs without using any ultralight materials.

The R3 (Response/Recon/Rescue) is a product of organic development says Stone Glacier owner and designer, Kurt Racicot. “We were approached by a few various individuals who had been using our hunting line of packs on different deployments and they loved them. The overall weight and design features were unique and not available from other pack manufactures. The consistent feedback was that if we just changed a couple of minor things and developed a few unique features for combat use our packs would be exactly what they were looking for. So, we did it. And the result is the R3 line of packs and accessories.”

The R3 is a modular design that can go from 3,300 cubic inches to 6,300 cubic inches offering customization of up to 8 detachable interior pockets, Stone Glacier’s unique Load Shelf, internal top molle grid for additional PALS pockets or radio carry and a top storm flap in the main bag for cable and antenna routing. Additionally, the R3 line of accessories includes a Conceal Lid to allow the internal concealed carry of carbines up to 33.5” collapsed OAL and the unique 240 Panel which attaches to the frame for quick access to eight 30 round magazines, all weight supported by the frame.

The R3 3300 is offered in Coyote Brown and Tan 499 and boasts an empty weight of only 4.55lbs. It is constructed of all Berry Compliant components and is proudly designed and manufactured in the USA. “We’ve cut no corners with this pack” says Stone Glacier CEO Jeff Sposito, “We’ve used only the best materials including proven Cordura® 500 D, YKK zippers and Duraflex buckles just to name a few. The response and feedback so far has been great and we are very excited to expand the R3 offering and continue to build products that meet the needs of the most demanding users.”

The R3 3300 is available now, direct from www.stoneglacier.com and is priced at $594 (MSRP). Contact Stone Glacier directly for more information at (406) 404-0641 or visit their showroom at 608 W Griffin Dr., Unit A, Bozeman MT 59715.

Marine Corps to Deliver Reinforced Pack Frames as Early as 2018

Thursday, August 3rd, 2017

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Virginia —
Grunts know a good ruck frame has got to last. That’s why a project team at Marine Corps Systems Command has developed a more durable pack frame; one that will better support the U.S. Marine Corps Pack that has been fielded to the operating forces since 2011.

The operational force will soon begin receiving a stronger, more durable pack frame designed to endure extreme temperatures, as well as wear and tear. The reinforced U.S. Marine Corps Pack Frame provides the same form, fit and function as the current frame, with stronger materials for both horizontal and vertical load-bearing support. These improvements were made in response to feedback from Marines who reported pack frame failures in extreme cold weather environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Bryan Nygaard)

The operational force will soon begin receiving a stronger, more durable pack frame designed to endure extreme temperatures, as well as wear and tear. The reinforced U.S. Marine Corps Pack Frame provides the same form, fit and function as the current frame, with stronger materials for both horizontal and vertical load-bearing support. These improvements were made in response to feedback from Marines who reported pack frame failures in extreme cold weather environment. (U.S. Marine Corps photo by Sgt. Bryan Nygaard)

The reinforced U.S. Marine Corps Pack Frame provides the same form, fit and function as the legacy frame, but with stronger materials for both horizontal and vertical load-bearing support.

“At Marine Corps Systems Command we continually monitor progress and work to identify new ways to increase performance and durability of the pack system,” said Capt. Jolanta Krempin, a project officer for Infantry Combat Equipment. “The Marine is at the center of everything we do and their feedback is always considered with acute interest regarding acquisition programs and capabilities.”

The acquisition command first learned of pack frames issues back in 2013, when Marines from School of Infantry-West noted a small number of frames were breaking. The program office proactively began rigorous laboratory testing on a reinforced pack frame, and then tested it with Recon units to assess its durability during airborne operations. Results were positive, said a program official.

Additional legacy pack frame breakages were reported during the winter of 2015 and 2016, as Marines participated in cold weather training at the Mountain Warfare Training Center in California, and coalition exercises in Norway. According to feedback from Marines, there were issues with legacy pack frames becoming brittle and snapping.

To assess the reinforced frame’s durability in arctic environments, MCSC flew in a half a dozen program officials last winter, who handed out dozens of reinforced frame prototypes to members of a unit deployed to Norway.

“We took the feedback we got and used it to inform how we could best reinforce the pack frame, while avoiding substantial weight increase or changes in fit and form,” said Mackie Jordan, ICE engineer.

Currently, MCSC is conducting additional environmental and field testing for a more comprehensive evaluation of the reinforced frame’s performance in extreme-cold temperatures. Testing will also investigate other causes of the legacy frame’s failures to mitigate potential issues with the reinforced frame.

“The reinforced frame is being tested in both constant cold temperature environments, as well as changing temperature environments,” said Jordan. “Future testing may include hot-to-cold/cold-to-hot testing to simulate rapid temperature changes during jump operations.”

During testing, frames will be subjected to an extreme cold temperature of 0° +/- 2° Fahrenheit for a period of one week. For each test, the frame will, at a minimum, be assessed for cracking, fatigue, or stress marks and cracking noises during flexibility testing.

Fielding of the reinforced frames is planned to begin in fiscal year 2018. Over time, as legacy frames meet a to-be-determined “expiration date,” they will be replaced with the reinforced frames, eliminating issues related to aging.

By Emily Greene, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

Gunner’s Fact Or Fiction – Does The Marine Pack Frame Hold Up?

Monday, July 31st, 2017

There's been a lot of scuttlebutt about the integrity of the Marine Corps' pack frame. If you tell a Marine he can't break something, he's going to prove you wrong and then tell his buddies how to do it as well. But, this time MARCORSYSCOM is one step ahead, as Gunner Christian Wade demonstrates in this video.