Eagle Industries

Archive for October, 2017

PEO Soldier Tests Modular Scalable Vest at Fort Carson

Monday, October 30th, 2017

FORT CARSON, Colo – Soldiers with the 71st Ordnance Group (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) and 10th Chemical Hazardous Response Company participated in the final round of field-testing for the Army’s new body armor, the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV), during a weeklong series of evaluated tasks conducted here Oct. 16-20.


SPC Hannah Carver-Frey, a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear specialist with 10th Chemical Hazardous Response Company, participates in the final round of field-testing for the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) during a weeklong series of evaluated tasks at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Once this evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army Photo by SSG Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

According to the U.S. Army Acquisition Support Center’s website, the MSV is part of the Soldier Protection System (SPS) and is the Army’s next generation Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) system. The SPS is a modular, scalable, tailorable system designed to defeat current threats at a reduced weight in comparison to the Army’s existing PPE.


Damon Brant, a new equipment trainer from Project Manager Soldier Protection Individual Equipment at Prince George, VA, ensures the proper wear and use of a new body armor system by SPC Creed Cooney, an explosive ordnance disposal technician with 62nd Ordnance Company, during a weeklong field-test of the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Following the field-test, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army photo by SSG Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

Stephen McNair, test manager for Project Manager Soldier Protection Individual Equipment (PM SPIE), a division of Program Executive Officer Soldier (PEO Soldier) at Fort Belvoir, was on-site to observe as Soldiers conducted an obstacle course, weapons training, don and doffing procedures, tactical vehicle access capabilities, and a ruck march.


Soldiers with in the 71st Ordnance Group (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) and 10th Chemical Hazardous Response Company participate in the final round of field-testing for the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) during a weeklong series of evaluated tasks at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Once this evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army photo by SSG Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

“We have been working on this vest for the past five years and have since have gone through four versions of the vest and an additional two versions of the Soldier plate carrier system,” said McNair.

McNair said once the evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year.


1LT Dawn Ward, a platoon leader with 663rd Ordnance Company and evaluation officer in charge, participates in the final round of field-testing for the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) during a weeklong series of evaluated tasks at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Once this evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army photo by SSG Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

Debuting in 2008, the Improved Outer Tactical Vest’s modular design was carried over and improved upon for the MSV. Most of the pouch attachment ladder system (PALS) have been replaced with a rubber-like material with laser-cut slots. The improvement still allows Soldiers to affix mission essential gear to the vest, while reducing overall weight.

The MSV weighs approximately 11-pounds, based on a medium size vest without ballistic plates. Fully configured, the MSV weighs approximately 25-pounds, which is five pounds lighter than the IOTV.


Michael Spencer, a new equipment trainer from Project Manager Soldier Protection Individual Equipment at Fort Bragg, NC, demonstrates how the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) can be separated into different configurations, during the final round of field-testing of the vest at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Once this evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army photo by SSG. Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

McNair said the big push to design a new body armor was based on “cutting down on the weight of a Soldier’s load.”

Many of the testers said the MSV was noticeably lighter than their current body armor.

“Compared to my IOTV, this vest is lighter and cooler, has a greater range of motion, and a better fit,” said 1st Lt. Dawn Ward, a platoon leader with 663rd Ordnance Company and officer in charge during the evaluation.

“It is a huge improvement over previous body armors,” Ward said.


Michael Spencer, a new equipment trainer from Project Manager Soldier Protection Individual Equipment at Fort Bragg, NC, demonstrates how to transfer ballistic plates from the Modular Scalable Vest (MSV) to a plate carrier configuration enclosed within the MSV, during the final round of field-testing of the vest at Fort Carson, CO, Oct. 18, 2017. Once this evaluation is complete, the vest will go into production and is expected to reach Soldiers in the field by summer of next year. (US Army photo by SSG Lance Pounds, 71st Ordnance Group (EOD), Public Affairs)

In addition to saving weight, the MSV is scalable, which was made possible by a four-tier configuration. The tier system will allow the wearer to tailor the vest to better fit mission requirements.

The first tier enables the wearer to pull out the inside soft armor to be used as concealable body armor. The second tier is the soft armor with plates. The third tier is the vest with ballistic plates and soft armor.

The final tier is the addition of a ballistic combat shirt that has built -in neck, shoulder and pelvic protection and a belt system designed to relocate much of what Soldiers affix to their vest to their hips.


(Graphic credit: PEO Soldier)

Spc. Isaac Bocanegra, an EOD technician with 764th OD CO, said he prefers the MSV’s ballistic combat shirt over the IOTV’s yoke and collar set up because it gives him more range of motion.

“I currently wear the IOTV about twice each day and it is quite a bit heavier than this body armor,” said Bocanegra. “Having this new body armor would make my job so much easier,” he added.

McNair said the premise of the tier system is to evenly distribute the system’s weight and reduces stress on a Soldier’s upper body.

“It will be up to unit leadership to determine the level of protection required for wear,” said McNair.

The MSV retained the quick-release feature first used in the IOTV to allow for easy removal in emergency situations, but with a simpler and interchangeable design. Instead of a single pull-tab, the MSV has a buckle system that can be used in one of three ways; left shoulder, right shoulder, or both depending on the wearer’s preference.

Extended sizing options allow the MSV to be tailorable and more accommodating to most Soldier body types.

“The extended range allows Soldiers to be more comfortable while performing tasks with greater ease,” said McNair.

“I have an extra-small because it positions the plates where I need them to be and it has a tighter fit for me,” said Spc. Hannah Carver-Frey, a chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear specialist with 10th Chemical Hazardous Response Company.

In addition to developing the lighter weight body armor, McNair said that developers at PEO Soldier are also working on an improved protective helmet system. It too, will be lighter than current protective helmets and capable of stopping certain 7.62 rounds.

For more information about the MSV body armor, visit the U.S. Army Acquisition Support Center’s website at asc.army.mil/web/portfolio-item/soldier-protection-system-sps

For more information about the future of Soldier protective equipment, visit the PEO Soldier’s website at www.peosoldier.army.mil.

This article was written by SSG Lance Pounds and shared via the Army News Service.

TacJobs – Witmer Public Safety Group 

Monday, October 30th, 2017

Seriously Seeking an Outside Law Enforcement
Sales Associate in Delaware/Maryland

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Who: An individual who is passionate about their craft; who recognizes and understands the needs of our law enforcement (LE) communities, and wants to do everything in their power to make the lives of our LE professionals safer and simpler.

What: We want a motivated individual who has LE sales experience, and whose previous work in the public safety industry has given them an excellent knowledge of LE products. Some of your responsibilities will include (but are certainly not limited to): selling our products and services to customers within your specified territory; keeping up-to-date records on products, prospects, and customers; identifying and soliciting new customers; submitting bids, quotes, and processing reports; meeting/exceeding sales levels and goals; and attending local and regional tradeshows.

Our ideal candidate has: exceptional written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills, is well-organized and capable of working on multiple projects concurrently, and manages their time exceedingly well. You’ll also need to be 21+ years of age, possess a valid driver’s license, a clean driving record, and be able to pass a PICS check.

When: Your hours are flexible and should be focused on meeting your customer’s needs.

Where: 104 Independence Way, Coatesville, PA 19320

Why: When our Co-Founder and Chairman Jim Witmer launched this great business, he did it because of his passion; not only his passion for public safety, but also his passion for making the world a better place. See a problem? Create a solution. See an opportunity? Seize it. That’s Jim Witmer, and it’s Witmer Public Safety Group. We want to empower you to use your knowledge and skill set to join the cause and help First Responders help others.
Too many words? Watch our video: WPSGInc.com/Careers

Are you in?

How: You can apply for this job in several ways; send your cover letter and resume via email to [email protected], via fax to 888-335-9800 (ATTN: Human Resources), or via mail at 104 Independence Way, Coatesville, PA 19320.

Marine Corps Reaches Final Stages of Tropical Boot, Uniform Testing

Monday, October 30th, 2017

MARINE CORPS BASE QUANTICO, Va. —
The Marine Corps wrapped up its fourth and final field user evaluation for a prototype tropical utility uniform and boots in late September.

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Between June and September, 400 Marines from 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marine Regiment put the new uniform and three types of boots to the test in a tropical climate. The testing was done in various locations on the island of Oahu, Hawaii.

“About four years ago, then Commandant Gen. James Amos directed us to explore tropical uniforms and boots for Marines,” said Todd Towles, program analyst for the Clothing and Equipment Team at Marine Corps Systems Command. “When he became commandant, Gen. [Robert] Neller followed up on the initiative, which brings us to where we are today.”

To date, MCSC has tested five different fabric types and four boots, downselecting to the single uniform fabric and three boot options that 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines tested. The goal of the final FUE was to collect feedback about the durability, fit and function of the prototypes that will be included along with other data in a decision package during the second quarter of fiscal year 2018.

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“When our program office goes out [to conduct a FUE], we talk to the Marines about what we’re testing and why,” Towles said. “We ask them to wear the uniform every day, whether they’re in the field or a classroom. At the end of the FUE, we conduct surveys and focus groups where we inspect the uniforms and talk to the Marines about wear and tear, how the uniform feels on the body and whether or not they could conduct their mission. If it interferes with the mission or training, we want that feedback as well.”

The tropical uniform prototype is made from a lighter-weight material than the current Marine Corps Combat Utility Uniform. The fabric is also designed to dry faster and keep Marines cooler in warm climates than the current utilities.

“The tropical uniform is made with the same fiber blend—nylon and cotton—as the MCCUU, but the fabric construction and weight are different,” Towles said. “The tropical uniform is approximately 30 percent lighter than the MCCUU.”

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The uniform also has a slightly heavier, reinforced fabric in the elbow, knee and groin areas to provide higher abrasion resistance against the mountainous terrain and dense vegetation of tropical environments.

“I prefer to wear these over the [current uniform] because they have thinner, lighter material,” said Lance Cpl. Kyle Herzog, an infantryman with 3rd Battalion, 3rd Marines. “It’s hot and humid here, and the current ones are thick and not as breathable. Once it’s wet, it’s damp or wet for days at a time. The [new uniform] dries within an hour. For Marines stationed in this environment, new cammies are a must.”

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The boots—designed by three different manufacturers—are intended to have a self-cleaning outsole and dry faster than the current boot. They are also a half pound to one pound lighter than the current boot out of the box, and thus much lighter when wet, Towles said.

“We had several different types [of boots], and all of them dry much faster than the regular boot, and they’re really light, so that’s been a huge combat multiplier for us,” said Battalion Operations Officer Maj. Evan Ota.

Marines could know as early as 2018 whether a new tropical uniform and boots will make their way to the fleet. If so, Marines slated to deploy or already stationed in tropical climates will be the first to have access to the items. The tropical uniforms and boots will be owned by the Marine Expeditionary Force supply and issued for contingency operations. Uniforms and boots could be available for optional purchase by Marines, pending certification.

“What we see throughout the Pacific is it’s a very hot, humid and wet environment with a lot of jungle and mountainous terrain,” Ota said. “So, anything you can do to lighten the load, dry yourself out quicker, take care of your feet and take care of your body definitely adds to your combat effectiveness.”

Article and Photos By Monique Randolph, MCSC Office of Public Affairs and Communication | Marine Corps Systems Command

Caveat Emptor – Counterfeit Tactical Augmented Pressure Switch Identified

Monday, October 30th, 2017

TNVC notified us that a counterfeit version of their joint venture with Unity Tactical, the Tactical Augmented Pressure Switch has been identified, along with this note.

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PSA: We have been made aware of an unlicensed copy of TAPS, made by a Hong Kong Airsoft company. The maker of these copies has since ceased, but we do not know how many were sold. These copies look almost identical except the logos are different and the contact leads are not standard. The laser lead on the fake will not fit standard US lasers. Just want to let you guys know about these so you don’t accidentally buy one on ebay and find out the hard way that it doesn’t work. here’s some pics of the fakes:

Always ensure you purchase your equipment from authorized dealers.

Mega Lumens Monday with the NEW XC1-B!

Monday, October 30th, 2017

Fountain Valley, CA—SureFire, LLC, manufacturer of the world’s finest—and most innovative—illumination tools and tactical products, is proud to announce the launch of the all new XC1-B compact handgun weaponlight. The XC1 was developed to be as compact and capable as possible and intended primarily for concealed-carry use. SureFire’s smallest and lightest weight weaponlight has been upgraded to deliver more output and feature improved switching based on feedback from subject matter experts. The new XC1-B has an output of 300 lumens and is now capable of one-handed constant-on activation.

Ambidextrous switching provides both momentary and constant-on activation options. Momentary activation is achieved by placing your support hand thumb on top of either of the two rear downward-activated switches and pushing down. The XC1-B will stay in momentary mode for as long as either toggle switch is depressed and held in the on position beyond a fraction of a second. Constant-on activation is achieved by quickly tapping either one of the momentary switches. To turn off the constant on mode, quickly touch and release either toggle switch. Constant-on can also be achieved by using your support hand to push the center crossbar switch from left to right.

www.surefire.com

You Never Know Where They’ll Show Up

Monday, October 30th, 2017

KCRF-Greetings from the Saalburg Castle, Hessia, Germany!

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Salve Eric! In ancient times, the Cohors II Raetorum civium Romanorum was based here – a Cavalry unit formed from auxiliar troops. Best regards, JP

Battle Systems Offering New Color Options For MPIL Mk I

Sunday, October 29th, 2017

We haven’t mentioned the Marker Panel, Individual, LW (MPIL) for quite awhile but we found out they are offering RealTree Xtra, Night Desert Grid and OD (seconds).

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The biggest advantages of the MPIL are its light weight and compact size. When unfolded, it measures 18” x 18”.

The MPIL is offered in a variety of reversible color combinations, from the original Orange/Pink to solids or prints along with Orange.

www.battlesystemsllc.com

TD – Lightweight Down Range Jacket

Sunday, October 29th, 2017

The new and improved TD Down Range Jacket featuring the new fabric down technology, Heat Sealed Baffling. This technology eliminates shedding of down feathers.


Features:
Hidden Side Pockets
Heat Sealed Baffling Technology
Lightweight (11oz in pouch)
Inside Stash Pockets
Zippered breast pocket w/ Sound Port
Packable pouch for easy storage
600 Fill Down

www.tacticaldistributors.com/products/td-down-range-jacket-2-1